Nikos Mamassis

Assistant Professor, Surveying Engineer, Dr. Engineer
N.Mamassis@itia.ntua.gr
+30-2107722843
http://www.itia.ntua.gr/nikos/

Participation in research projects

Participation as Project Director

  1. Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system
  2. Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"
  3. Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas

Participation as Principal Investigator

  1. Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO)
  2. DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools
  3. Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

Participation as Researcher

  1. Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens
  2. EU COST Action C22: Urban Flood Management
  3. Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)
  4. Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens
  5. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece - Phases 1 and 2
  6. Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake
  7. Assessment of sediment generation in Thriasio
  8. Appraisal of river sediment deposits in reservoirs of hydropower dams
  9. National databank for hydrological and meteorological information - Hydroscope 2000
  10. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3
  11. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phases 1, 2, 3
  12. Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia
  13. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems
  14. Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information
  15. Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river
  16. AFORISM: A comprehensive forecasting system for flood risk mitigation and control
  17. Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information
  18. A pilot study for the water resources management of the Epirus water district
  19. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1
  20. A pilot study for the management of the Louros and Arachthos watersheds
  21. Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2
  22. Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1
  23. Hydrological investigation of the Thessalia water basin

Participation in engineering studies

  1. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Ανατολικής Πελοποννήσου (GR03)
  2. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Βόρειας Πελοποννήσου (GR02)
  3. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Κρήτης (GR13)
  4. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Δυτικής Πελοποννήσου (GR01)
  5. Παροχή Συμβουλευτικών Υπηρεσιών για την Κατάρτιση του 2ου Σχεδίου Διαχείρισης Λεκάνης Απορροής Ποταμού της Κύπρου για την Εφαρμογή της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ και για την Κατάρτιση του Σχεδίου Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας για την Εφαρμογή της Οδηγίας 2007/60
  6. Investigation of the hydrographic network development in Mavro Vouno, Grammatiko, Attica, Greece
  7. Water supply works from Gadouras dam - Phase B
  8. Study of the management of Kephisos
  9. Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta
  10. Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos
  11. Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας
  12. Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia
  13. Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos
  14. Diversion of the Soulou Stream for the Development of Lignite Exploitations of the Public Power Corporation in the Mine of Southern Field of Region Kozani-Ptolemais
  15. Hydrological and hydraulic study for the flood protection of the new railway in the region of Sperhios river
  16. Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam"
  17. Consultative service for the spring "Kephalovriso" in Kaloskope
  18. Complementary study of environmental impacts from the diversion of Acheloos to Thessaly
  19. Estimation of losses from DXX canal in the irrigation network of Lower Acheloos
  20. Concerted actions for the sector of environment in Santorine and Therasia islands
  21. Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa
  22. Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system
  23. Integrated study of the environmental impacts from Acheloos diversion
  24. Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

Published work

Publications in scientific journals

  1. H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, A. Delichatsiou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A perpetually interrupted interbasin water transfer as a modern Greek drama: Assessing the Acheloos to Pinios interbasin water transfer in the context of integrated water resources management, Open Water Journal, 4 (1), 113–128, 12, 2017.
  2. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial analysis of the electrical energy demand in Greece, Energy Policy, 102 (340-352), doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2016.12.033, March 2017.
  3. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial Analysis of Electrical Energy Demand Patterns in Greece: Application of a GIS-based Methodological Framework, Energy Procedia, 97 (262-269), 8 pages, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2016.10.071, November 2016.
  4. K. Kollyropoulos, F. Georma, F. Saranti, N. Mamassis, and I. Kalavrouziotis, Urban planning and water management in Ancient Aetolian Makyneia, Western Greece, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 16 (5), doi:DOI: 10.2166/ws.2016.145 , September 2016.
  5. P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, A. Oikonomou, V. Pagana, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping, Journal of Hydrology, 534, 478–492, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.01.020, 2016.
  6. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Malamos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Evaluation of a parametric approach for estimating potential evapotranspiration across different climates, Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia, 4, 2–9, doi:10.1016/j.aaspro.2015.03.002, 2015.
  7. N. Mamassis, S. Moustakas, and N. Zarkadoulas, Representing the operation of ancient reclamation works at Lake Copais in Greece, Water History, doi:10.1007/s12685-015-0126-x, 2015.
  8. A. N. Angelakis, N. Mamassis, E. Dialynas, and P. Defteraios, Urban Water Supply, Wastewater, and Stormwater Considerations in Ancient Hellas: Lessons Learned, Environment and Natural Resources Research, 4 (3), doi:10.5539/enrr.v4n3p95, October 2014.
  9. N. Mamassis, D. Panagoulia, and A. Novcovic, Sensitivity analysis of Penman evaporation method, Global Network for Environmental Science and Technology, 16, May 2014, (in press).
  10. K. Zotalis, E. Dialynas, N. Mamassis, and A. N. Angelakis, Desalination Technologies: Hellenic Experience, Water, 6 (5), 1134–1150, doi:10.3390/w6051134, 30 April 2014.
  11. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Flood design recipes vs. reality: can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted?, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 14, 1417–1428, doi:10.5194/nhess-14-1417-2014, 2014.
  12. N. Efthimiou, S. Alexandris, C Karavitis, and N. Mamassis, Comparative analysis of reference evapotranspiration estimation between various methods and the FAO56 Penman - Monteith procedure , European Water, 42 (19-34), 2013.
  13. C. Papathanasiou, D. Serbis, and N. Mamassis, Flood mitigation at the downstream areas of a transboundary river, Water Utility Journal, 3, 33–42, 2013.
  14. E. Kountouri, N. Petrochilos, N. Liaros, V. Oikonomou, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, N. Zarkadoulas, A. Vött, H. Hadler, P. Henning, and T. Willershäuser, The Mycenaean drainage works of north Kopais, Greece: a new project incorporating surface surveys, geophysical research and excavation, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 13 (3), 710–718, doi:10.2166/ws.2013.110, 2013.
  15. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Apostolidou, Topography-adjusted solar radiation indices and their importance in hydrology, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 57 (4), 756–775, doi:10.1080/02626667.2012.670703, 2012.
  16. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, G. G. Anagnostopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Scientific dialogue on climate: is it giving black eyes or opening closed eyes? Reply to “A black eye for the Hydrological Sciences Journal” by D. Huard, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56 (7), 1334–1339, 2011.
  17. G. G. Anagnostopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (7), 1094–1110, doi:10.1080/02626667.2010.513518, 2010.
  18. G. Papathopoulou, E. Georgiou, N. Mamassis, and M. Mimikou, Estimation of areal distribution of climatic and bioclimatic indices in Attica region using the METEONET Network data, Technica Chronica, I, Athens, January 2009.
  19. D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Makropoulos, A. Langousis, S. Baki, A. Efstratiadis, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, and N. Mamassis, Climate, hydrology, energy, water: recognizing uncertainty and seeking sustainability, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 13, 247–257, doi:10.5194/hess-13-247-2009, 2009.
  20. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and A. Christofides, On the credibility of climate predictions, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 53 (4), 671–684, 2008.
  21. A. Tsouni, C. Contoes, D. Koutsoyiannis, P. Elias, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of actual evapotranspiration by remote sensing: Application in Thessaly Plain, Greece, Sensors, 8 (6), 3586–3600, 2008.
  22. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Logical and illogical exegeses of hydrometeorological phenomena in ancient Greece, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 7 (1), 13–22, 2007.
  23. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water basin balance model using a geographical information system, Technica Chronica, 24 (1-3), 43–52, 2004.
  24. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, A decision support system for the management of the water resource system of Athens, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 28 (14-15), 599–609, doi:10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2, 2003.
  25. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, On the representation of hyetograph characteristics by stochastic rainfall models, Journal of Hydrology, 251, 65–87, 2001.
  26. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Influence of atmospheric circulation types in space-time distribution of intense rainfall, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 101 (D21), 26267–26276, 1996.

Book chapters and fully evaluated conference publications

  1. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Irrigation challenges in NW Greece-Perspectives and solutions for flood prone areas, 14th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (CEST2015), Global Network on Environmental Science and Technology, University of the Aegean, 2015.
  2. S. Mihas, A. Efstratiadis, K. Nikolaou, and N. Mamassis, Drought and water scarcity management plan for the Peloponnese river basin districts, 12th International Conference “Protection & Restoration of the Environment”, Skiathos, Dept. of Civil Engineering and Dept. of Planning & Regional Development, Univ. Thessaly, Stevens Instute of Technology, 2014.
  3. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Views on ancient Hellenic science and technology, IWA Regional Symposium on Water, Wastewater & Environment: Traditions & Culture, Patras, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2702.6163, International Water Association, 2014.
  4. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Information technologies in hydrometeorological data management in Greece, Honorary Edition for for Professor Emeritus D. Tolikas, edited by K. L. Katsifarakis and M. Vafiadis, 27–37, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1165.5928, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2013.
  5. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, N. Kappos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological network for flood monitoring and modeling, Proceedings of First International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of Environment, Paphos, Cyprus, 8795, 10-1–10-10, doi:10.1117/12.2028621, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2013.
  6. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, openmeteo.org: a web service for the dissemination of free meteorological data, Advances in Meteorology, Climatology and Atmospheric Physics, edited by C.G. Helmis and P. Nastos, Athens, 203–208, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-29172-2_29, Springer, Athens, 2012.
  7. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Zarkadoulas, N. Mamassis, A. N. Angelakis, and L. W. Mays, The evolution of water supply throughout the millennia: A short overview, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, 21, 553–560, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2541.8485, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.
  8. N. Zarkadoulas, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. N. Angelakis, A brief history of urban water management in ancient Greece, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, 10, 259–270, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4114.7127, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.
  9. A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Prolegomena: The evolution of water supply through the millennia, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, xxi–xxii, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1542.4245, IWA Publishing, 2012.
  10. E. Kountouri, N. Petrochilos, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, N. Zarkadoulas, A. Vött, H. Hadler, P. Henning, and T. Willershäuser, A new project of surface survey, geophysical and excavation research of the mycenaean drainage works of the North Kopais: the first study season, 3rd IWA Specialized Conference on Water & Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, Istanbul, Turkey, 467–476, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2328.8563, International Water Association, 2012.
  11. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Zarkadoulas, and Y. Markonis, Floods in Greece, Changes of Flood Risk in Europe, edited by Z. W. Kundzewicz, Chapter 12, 238–256, IAHS Press, Wallingford – International Association of Hydrological Sciences, 2012.
  12. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A web based information system for the inspection of the hydraulic works in Ancient Greece, Ancient Water Technologies, edited by L. W. Mays, 103–114, doi:10.1007/978-90-481-8632-7_6, Springer, Dordrecht, 2010.
  13. N. Evelpidou, N. Mamassis, A. Vassilopoulos, C. Makropoulos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Flooding in Athens: The Kephisos River flood event of 21-22/10/1994, International Conference on Urban Flood Management, Paris, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4065.5601, UNESCO, 2009.
  14. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, New approaches to estimation of extreme rainfall, 1st Hellenic Conference on Large Dams, Larisa, 2, 433–440, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1116.4400, Hellenic Commission on Large Dams, Technical Chamber of Greece, 2008.
  15. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Physical, social and technological aspects of drought - The Athens example, Natural and Technological Disasters in Europe and Greece, edited by K. Sapountzaki, 61–88, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1640.7289, Gutenberg, Athens, 2007.
  16. N. Mamassis, V. Kanellopoulos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A web based information system for the inspection of the hydraulic works in Ancient Greece, 5th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics, Tempe, Arizona, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3475.7362, International Association of Hydraulic Research, 2007.
  17. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Logical and illogical exegeses of hydrometeorological phenomena in ancient Greece, Proceedings of the 1st IWA International Symposium on Water and Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, edited by A. N. Angelakis and D. Koutsoyiannis, Iraklio, 135–143, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4188.4408, International Water Association, 2006.
  18. A. Grammatikoyiannis, N. Mamassis, E. Baltas, and M. Mimikou, A meteorological telemetric network for monitoring of the Athens wider area (Meteonet). A real time approach from point to areal measurements, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (9CEST), Rhodes, Department of Environmental Studies, University of the Aegean, 2005.
  19. N. Mamassis, A. Christofides, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological data acquisition, management and analysis for the Athens water supply system, BALWOIS Conference on Water Observation and Information System for Decision Support, Ochrid, FYROM, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1845.5284, Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning FYROM, Skopie, 2004.
  20. A. Tsouni, D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Contoes, N. Mamassis, and P. Elias, Estimation of actual evapotranspiration by remote sensing: Application in Thessalia plain, Greece, Proceedings of the International Conference "Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing: Environmental Applications", Volos, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3025.1763, 2003.
  21. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A hydrometeorological telemetric network for the water resources monitoring of the Athens water resource system, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of European Water Resources Association: "Water Resources Management in the Era of Transition", edited by G. Tsakiris, Athens, 157–163, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3954.9683, European Water Resources Association, 2002.
  22. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Christofides, Experience from the operation of the automatic telemetric meteorological station in the National Technical University, Proceedings of the 8th National Congress of the Greek Hydrotechnical Association, edited by G. Christodoulou, A. Stamou, and A. Nanou, Athens, 301–308, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4577.5603, Greek Hydrotechnical Association, 2000.
  23. N. Mamassis, et D. Koutsoyiannis, Structure stochastique de pluies intenses par type de temps, Publications de l'Association Internationale de Climatologie, 6eme Colloque International de Climatologie, edité par P. Maheras, Thessaloniki, 6, 301–313, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3643.6726, Association Internationale de Climatologie, Aix-en-Provence Cedex, France, 1993.
  24. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, et D. Koutsoyiannis, Le phénomène recent de sécheresse persistante et l' alimentation en eau de la cité d' Athènes, Publications de l'Association Internationale de Climatologie, 6eme Colloque International de Climatologie, edité par P. Maheras, Thessaloniki, 6, 123–132, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4430.1041, Association Internationale de Climatologie, Aix-en-Provence Cedex, France, 1993.
  25. D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Tsolakidis, and N. Mamassis, HYDRA-PC, A data base system for regional hydrological data management, Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Advances in Water Resources Technology, Athens, 551–557, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4954.3921, Balkema, Rotterdam, 1991.
  26. P. Avgerinou , Ε. Chiotis , S. Chrisoulaki, P. Defteraios, T. Evangelou , M. Gigourtakis, G. Kakes, Y. Kourtzellis , P. Koutis, N. Mamassis, M. Pappa, G. Peppas, and A. Strataridaki, Updated Appraisal of Ancient Underground Aqueducts in Greece, Underground Aqueducts Handbook, edited by A. N. Angelakis, Ε. Chiotis , S. Eslamian , and H. Weingartner, doi:10.1201/9781315368566-5, 2016.
  27. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Mitigating flooding in a typical urban area in North Western Attica in Greece, Conference on Changing Cities: Spatial Design, Landscape and Socio-economic Dimensions, Porto Heli, Peloponnese, Greece, June 2015.
  28. S. Mihas, K. Nikolaou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of sediment yield with MUSLE and monitoring. A case study for Tsiknias dam at Lesvos Island in Greece, IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals, Thessaloniki, 8 pages, 12 May 2015.

Conference publications and presentations with evaluation of abstract

  1. V. Daniil, G. Pouliasis, E. Zacharopoulou, E. Demetriou, G. Manou, M. Chalakatevaki, I. Parara, C. Georganta, P. Stamou, S. Karali, E. Hadjimitsis, G. Koudouris, E. Moschos, D. Roussis, K. Papoulakos, A. Koskinas, G. Pollakis, N. Gournari, K. Sakellari, Y. Moustakis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, H. Tyralis, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, E. Deligiannis, V. Tsoukala, P. Papanicolaou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The uncertainty of atmospheric processes in planning a hybrid renewable energy system for a non-connected island, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-16781-4, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.29610.62406, European Geosciences Union, 2017.
  2. P. Stamou, S. Karali, M. Chalakatevaki, V. Daniil, K. Tzouka, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, P. Papanicolaou, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Creating the electric energy mix of a non-connected Aegean island, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-10130-10, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.36537.77927, European Geosciences Union, 2017.
  3. G. Koudouris, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of the stochastic nature of solar radiation for renewable resources management, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-10189-4, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16215.06564, European Geosciences Union, 2017.
  4. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial analysis of electricity demand patterns in Greece: Application of a GIS-based methodological framework, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, European Geosciences Union, 2016.
  5. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, The water supply of Athens through the centuries, 16th conference Cura Aquarum, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24516.22400/1, German Water History Association, German Archaeological Institute in Athens, 2015.
  6. H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, and N. Mamassis, Analysis of the electricity demand of Greece for optimal planning of a large-scale hybrid renewable energy system, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-5643, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  7. A. Koukouvinos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, E. Rozos, S.M. Papalexiou, P. Dimitriadis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Integrated water and renewable energy management: the Acheloos-Peneios region case study, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-4912, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  8. A. Efstratiadis, I. Tsoukalas, P. Kossieris, G. Karavokiros, A. Christofides, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Computational issues in complex water-energy optimization problems: Time scales, parameterizations, objectives and algorithms, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-5121, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.11015.80802, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  9. A. Drosou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Lykou, P. Kossieris, I. Tsoukalas, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Assessing and optimising flood control options along the Arachthos river floodplain (Epirus, Greece), European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-9148, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  10. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Malamos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Evaluation of a parametric approach for estimating potential evapotranspiration across different climates, IRLA2014 – The Effects of Irrigation and Drainage on Rural and Urban Landscapes, Patras, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14004.24966, 2014.
  11. G. Karakatsanis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Entropy, pricing and macroeconomics of pumped-storage systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2014, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 16, Vienna, EGU2014-15858-6, European Geosciences Union, 2014.
  12. T. Tsitseli, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Construction of ombrian curves using the Hydrognomon software system, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  13. E. C. Moschou, S. C. Batelis, Y. Dimakos, I. Fountoulakis, Y. Markonis, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Spatial and temporal rainfall variability over Greece, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19102.95045, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  14. N. Bountas, N. Boboti, E. Feloni, L. Zeikos, Y. Markonis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Temperature variability over Greece: Links between space and time, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17739.80164, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  15. Y. Markonis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of drought characteristics in different temporal and spatial scales: A case study in the Mediterranean region , Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  16. G. Karakatsanis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24450.68809, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  17. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A stochastic simulation framework for flood engineering, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  18. D. Panagoulia, N. Mamassis, and A. Gkiokas, Deciphering the floodplain inundation maps in Greece, 8th International Conference "Water Resources Management in an Interdisciplinary and Changing Context", Porto, Portugal, 8 pages, European Water Resources Association, 2013.
  19. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Flood mitigation at the downstream areas of a transboundary river, 8th International Conference "Water Resources Management in an Interdisciplinary and Changing Context", Porto, Portugal, 10 pages, European Water Resources Association, 2013.
  20. V. Pagana, A. Tegos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Panagopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Alternative methods in floodplain hydraulic simulation - Experiences and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10283-2, European Geosciences Union, 2013.
  21. A. Oikonomou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Tegos, V. Pagana, P. Panagopoulos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10366, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040, European Geosciences Union, 2013.
  22. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and S. Lykoudis, Flood design recipes vs. reality: Can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted? – A perspective from Greece, Advanced methods for flood estimation in a variable and changing environment, Volos, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19660.00644, University of Thessaly, 2012.
  23. M. Mathioudaki, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Investigation of hydrological design practices based on historical flood events in an experimental basin of Greece (Lykorema, Penteli), Advanced methods for flood estimation in a variable and changing environment, Volos, University of Thessaly, 2012.
  24. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and D. Nikolopoulos, Using open source software for the supervision and management of the water resources system of Athens, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14, Vienna, 7158, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482, European Geosciences Union, 2012.
  25. E. Galiouna, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and K. Aristeidou, Investigation of extreme flows in Cyprus: empirical formulas and regionalization approaches for peak flow estimation, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 13, Vienna, 2077, European Geosciences Union, 2011.
  26. Y. Markonis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Orbital climate theory and Hurst-Kolmogorov dynamics, 11th International Meeting on Statistical Climatology, Edinburgh, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.31312.30724, International Meetings on Statistical Climatology, University of Edinburgh, 2010.
  27. A. Varveris, P. Panagopoulos, K. Triantafillou, A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assessment of environmental flows of Acheloos Delta, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 12, Vienna, 12046, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14849.66404, European Geosciences Union, 2010.
  28. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrognomon – open source software for the analysis of hydrological data, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 12, Vienna, 12419, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.21350.83527, European Geosciences Union, 2010.
  29. A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Estimation of potential evapotranspiration with minimal data dependence, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2009, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, Vienna, 1937, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27222.86089, European Geosciences Union, 2009.
  30. G. G. Anagnostopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Credibility of climate predictions revisited, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2009, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, Vienna, 611, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.15898.24009, European Geosciences Union, 2009.
  31. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, and S.M. Papalexiou, Assessment of the reliability of climate predictions based on comparisons with historical time series, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2008, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, Vienna, 09074, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16658.45768, European Geosciences Union, 2008.
  32. N. Zarkadoulas, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and S.M. Papalexiou, Climate, water and health in ancient Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2008, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, Vienna, 12006, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.31757.95207, European Geosciences Union, 2008.
  33. K. Hadjibiros, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and E. Kyritsis, Data base for the Greek nature (FILOTIS), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007.
  34. N. Mamassis, C. Papathanasiou, and M. Mimikou, Hydrometeorological measurements network in Athens area (METEONET), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007, (in press).
  35. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, K. Noutsopoulos, E. Romas, L. Kaliakatsos, A. Andreadakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The ODYSSEUS project: Developing an advanced software system for the analysis and management of water resource systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 03910, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805, European Geosciences Union, 2006.
  36. N. Mamassis, Calculation of potential solar radiation from geomorphologic information for snow melting estimation, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, European Geosciences Union, 2005.
  37. A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S.M. Papalexiou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrogeios, an integrated model for simulating complex hydrographic networks - A case study to West Thessaly region, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881, European Geosciences Union, 2005.
  38. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrognomon - A hydrological data management and processing software tool, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2005, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, Vienna, 04644, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34222.10561, European Geosciences Union, 2005.
  39. A. Tsouni, D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Contoes, N. Mamassis, and P. Elias, Application of satellite-based methods for estimating evapotranspiration in Thessalia plain, Greece, EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 5, Nice, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3221.7840, European Geophysical Society, 2003.
  40. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A simple water balance model using a geographical information system, 26th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 3, Nice, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.26357.78567, European Geophysical Society, 2001.
  41. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, The scaling model of storm hyetograph versus typical stochastic rainfall event models, 24th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 1, The Hague, 769, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1192.2165, European Geophysical Society, 1999.
  42. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Metsovo: The hydrological heart of Greece, Proceedings of the 1st Inter-university Conference for Metsovo, edited by D. Rokos, Metsovo, 209–229, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2928.9205, National Technical University of Athens Press – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1998.
  43. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Weather types and geographical distribution of intense rainfall, Abstracts of the 5th International Conference on Precipitation, Elounda, Greece, 1.13, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1290.5208, 1995.
  44. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and I. Nalbantis, Intense rainfall and flood event classification by weather type, 19th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Annales Geophysicae, Vol. 12, Supplement II, Part II, Grenoble, 440, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4124.9520, European Geophysical Society, 1994.
  45. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, Stochastic rainfall forecasting by conditional simulation using a scaling storm model, 19th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Annales Geophysicae, Vol. 12, Supplement II, Part II, Grenoble, 324, 408, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1241.3682, European Geophysical Society, 1994.
  46. N. Mamassis, S. Roti, D. Koutsoyiannis, and Th. Xanthopoulos, Hydrological characteristics of the Mornos, Evinos and Yliki basins, Workshop for the perspectives of resolving the water supply problem of Athens, edited by D. Koutsoyiannis, 55–64, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2177.3043, G. Fountas, 1990.

Presentations and publications in workshops

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The quantitative dimension of WFD 2000/60, Water Framework Directive 2000/60 and Inland Water Protection: Research and Perspectives, Athens, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Specific Secreteriat of Water – Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, 2015.
  2. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Varveris, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assesment and implementation of ecological flow constraints in large hydroelectric works: The case of Acheloos, Ecological flow of rivers and the importance of their true assesment, 2014.
  3. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Perspectives of combined management of water and energy in Thessaly region, , Larissa, 21 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.15760.61442, Technical Chamber of Greece / Department of CW Thessaly, 2014.
  4. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Exploration of ancient Greek hydraulic tecnhology using web-based data, Hydrotechnologies in Ancient Greece, edited by E. G. Kolokytha, Thessaloniki, 21 pages, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2013.
  5. A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Peppas, and A. Maheras, Estimating flood flows in ungauged Greek basins under hydroclimatic variability (Deukalion project) - Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Climate and Environmental Change in the Mediterranean Region, Pylos, Navarino Environmental Observatory, 2012.
  6. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Climatic uncertainty and water resources management - from science to divination, 23th general assembly EDEYA, Larisa, Larisa, 2011.
  7. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Strategy for flood prevention: Modern technological framework, Integrated planning of flood protection: A challenge for the future, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27671.78242, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, Athens, 2010.
  8. N. Mamassis, E. Tiligadas, D. Koutsoyiannis, M. Salahoris, G. Karavokiros, S. Mihas, K. Noutsopoulos, A. Christofides, S. Kozanis, A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, and L. Bensasson, HYDROSCOPE: National Databank for Hydrological, Meteorological and Geographical Information, Towards a rational handling of current water resource problems: Utilizing Data and Informatics for Information, Hilton Hotel, Athens, 2010.
  9. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Hydrometeorological issues in ancient Greek science and philosophy, The Eco-nomy of Water, edited by E Efthymiopoulos and M. Modinos, Hydra island, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25574.63040, Hellenica Grammata, 2009.
  10. A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Optimization of the water supply network of Athens, Second International Congress: "Environment - Sustainable Water Resource Management", Athens, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, European Council of Civil Engineers, 2007.
  11. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, The Master Plan for the water resource management of Greece (invited talk), International Conference: Integrated Management of Coastal Areas, Faliro, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005, CoPraNet, Mediterranean SOS, 2006.
  12. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, and N. Mamassis, ODYSSEUS: Information system for the simulation and management of hydrosystems, 15th meeting of the Greek users of Geographical Information Systems (G.I.S.) ArcInfo - ArcView - ArcIMS, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14145.15203, Marathon Data Systems, 2005.
  13. N. Mamassis, and S Politaki, Evolution of water demand in the city of Athens, Water for the city: Strategic planning, demand management and network losses control, National Technical University of Athens, University of the Aegean, Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens, 2000.
  14. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water balance model of a catchment using geographical information system, 10th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo - ArcView, Marathon Data Systems, 2000.
  15. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and E. Arapaki, Water shortage in Ethiopia: A first approach, Solidarity for Ethiopia, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.23556.12165, Hellas-Ethiopia, General Consulate of Ethiopia in Greece, 2000.
  16. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Study of the geographical distribution of hydrometeorological variables using geographical information system, 5th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1995.
  17. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, A. Christofides, A. Manetas, A. Sakellariou, R. Mavrodimou, N. Papakostas, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and Th. Xanthopoulos, HYDROSCOPE: Creation of a national data bank of hydrological and meteorological information, Research and Technology Days '95, National Technical University of Athens, 1995.
  18. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, Rainfall modelling, Workshop for the presentation of the research project A comprehensive forecasting system for flood risk mitigation and control, Bologna, Italy, University of Bologna, 1994.
  19. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, E. Baltas, M. Aftias, M. Mimikou, and Th. Xanthopoulos, Hydrologic characteristics of the water shortage, The water supply problem of Athens, 13–28, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 1994.
  20. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Some results on rainfall modelling - Univariate versus multivariate stochastic modelling of rainfall, 5th Meeting of AFORISM, Cork, Ireland, University College Cork, 1993.
  21. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, An attempt for stochastic forecasting of rainfall, 4th Meeting of AFORISM, Grenoble, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 1993.
  22. N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of hydrological characteristics of Mornos, Boeoticos Kephisos and Yliki basins, Water Supply of Athens, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, Greek Union of Chemical Engineers, Association of the Greek Consulting Companies, 1992.
  23. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Assessment of the risk for inadequacy of the water supply system of Athens in case of persistent drought, Likelihood of persistent drought and water supply of Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.13244.03207, Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens, 1992.
  24. I. Spyrakos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Development of a geographical information system for hydrological data, 1st meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1991.
  25. N. Mamassis, Hydrological approach of Acheloos-Thessaly hydrosystem, The developmental role of the Acheloos diversion works, Karditsa, 14 March 2010.
  26. N. Mamassis, The hydrological cycle, Conference dedicated to the Universal day of water, Agios Nikolaos, DEYA of Agios Nikolaos, 23 March 2009.

Various publications

  1. S. Chrisoulaki, and N. Mamassis, Research on water supply of ancient Piraeus. Synthesis of approaches-Further research, 14 pages, 15 May 2015.
  2. N. Mamassis, P. Defteraios, N. Zarkadoulas, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Research on water supply of ancient Piraeus-Representation of ancient cisterns operation, 16 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.11392.64000, 15 May 2015.

Books

  1. A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, 560 pages, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

Educational notes

  1. N. Mamassis, Water control through history, August 2014.
  2. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Water Resources Management - Part 2, 97 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2011.
  3. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Hydrometeorology - Part 2, Edition 2, 176 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 2000.
  4. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Advanced Hydrology - Part 2, 65 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1999.

Academic works

  1. N. Mamassis, Rainfall analysis by weather type, PhD thesis, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1997.

Research reports

  1. D. Dermatas, N. Mamassis, I. Panagiotakis, and A. Efstratiadis, Evaluation of environmental impracts due to water flows through Mavrorachi landfill, Investigation of the qualitative adequacy of the bottom of cell A3 and of the transitional bonding with cell A1 as well as the environmental impacts from the operation of the landfill , Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, March 2017.
  2. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, D. Nikolopoulos, H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Case study in the Acheloos-Thessaly system, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 98 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2015.
  3. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, and H. Tyralis, Methodological framework for optimal planning and management of water and renewable energy resources, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 154 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, April 2015.
  4. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Michaelidi, E. Galiouna, K. Tzouka, A. D. Koussis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Description of regional approaches for the estimation of characteristic hydrological quantities, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 146 pages, September 2014.
  5. A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, P. Dimitriadis, and A. Maheras, Litterature review of flood hydrology and related tools, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 115 pages, October 2012.
  6. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Final report, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 2, 84 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2011.
  7. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, and N. Mamassis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2009, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 1, 116 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, April 2009.
  8. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and S. Baki, Final report, Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas, Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, November 2008.
  9. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Summary report, Athens, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, August 2008.
  10. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 4, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 2008.
  11. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Alternative scenarios for the management and optimal operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 3, 104 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2008.
  12. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, D. Mamais, and K. Noutsopoulos, National Programme for the Management and Protection of Water Resources, Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation, 748 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 2008.
  13. N. Mamassis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Efstratiadis, M. Heidarlis, A. Tegos, A. Koukouvinos, P. Lazaridou, M. Magaliou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of alternative organisations and operations of a Water Management Body for the Smokovo projects, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 2, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2007.
  14. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and N. Mamassis, Data report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 1, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2006.
  15. G. Lourmas, and N. Mamassis, Network installation specifications for the measurement of hydrological parameters, Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS), Contractor: NAMA, Report 10, 57 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, June 2005.
  16. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 25, 135 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2004.
  17. A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 17, 72 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.
  18. N. Mamassis, Monitoring system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 16, 88 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.
  19. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, E. Rozos, A. Economou, and G. M. T. Tentes, Methodology and theoretical background, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 15, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.
  20. N. Mamassis, and et al., Appendix 1: Calculations of basic quantities, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Appendix 1, 58 pages, Athens, January 2003.
  21. Ministry of Development, NTUA, Institute of Geological and Mining Research, and Centre for Research and Planning, Master plan for water resource management of the country, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 549 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, January 2003.
  22. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, Ch. Karopoulos, A. Nassikas, E. Nestoridou, and D. Nikolopoulos, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2002–2003, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 14, 215 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2002.
  23. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological Study, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 2, 70 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.
  24. K. Hadjibiros, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, A. Katsiri, A. Stamou, A. Valassopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, I. Katsiris, M. Kapetanaki, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, K. Noutsopoulos, G.-F. Sargentis, and A. Christofides, Overview report, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 1, 23 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.
  25. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation of intense rainfall and sediment yield in Thriasio, Assessment of sediment generation in Thriasio, 21 pages, School of Civil Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 2001.
  26. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, Ch. Karopoulos, S. Nalpantidou, A. Nassikas, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Xanthakis, and K. Ripis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2001–2002, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 13, Athens, December 2001.
  27. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Final Report of Phase A, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 12, 63 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.
  28. A. Efstratiadis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 8, 129 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.
  29. N. Mamassis, D. Constantinidis, and J. Gavriilidis, Technical features of the hydrometeorological stations and the telecommunications system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 4, 34 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.
  30. N. Mamassis, and J. Gavriilidis, Siting of hydrometeorological stations, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 3, 30 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.
  31. G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, N. Damianoglou, K. Constantinidou, S. Nalpantidou, A. Xanthakis, and S Politaki, Analysis of the system requirements, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 1, 74 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2000.
  32. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, A. Xanthakis, S Politaki, and V. Tsoukala, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2000-2001, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 5, 165 pages, Athens, December 2000.
  33. A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Processing of geographical information, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 3, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.
  34. E. Xanthopoulou, N. Mamassis, P. Anastassopoulou, and K. Alexopoulou, Updating hydrometeorological data, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 1, 240 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.
  35. Team of the YBET96 project, Master plan for the country's water resource management, Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 339 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, November 1996.
  36. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Hydrometric data of secondary stations, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report Δ, 228 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.
  37. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Hydrometric data of primary stations, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report B, 118 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.
  38. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Daily rainfall data, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report A, 473 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.
  39. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydroscope II - A preliminary application to the Thessaly water district - Final Report, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, 41 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.
  40. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, N. Mamassis, and A. Koukouvinos, Surface water resources, Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 16 pages, 1995.
  41. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Maps - Part A: Information of the surface hydrology, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.
  42. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Development of a geographical information system- Section A: Surface hydrology information, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 22, 48 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.
  43. N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Study of hydrological balances, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 20, 118 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.
  44. A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 18, 268 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.
  45. NTUA Hydroscope Team, HYDROSCOPE, User manual for the database and applications for hydrology and meteorology, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 180 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1994.
  46. G. Kavvadias, S. Tzovaridis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Fitting the Stage-Discharge Curves, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 8/4, 25 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1993.
  47. N. Mamassis, and P. Papanicolaou, Selection and calculation of secondary parameters in surface hydrology (More specifically STAGE-DISCHARGE and DISCHARGE-SEDIMENT LOAD relationships), Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 1/4, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 1993.
  48. J. Papageorgiou, G. Sakellaridis, Th. Charantonis, Ch. Pougialis, N. Mamassis, and M. Gini, Design of Codification of Stations, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 5/8, 61 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1993.
  49. K. Alexopoulou, P. Anastassopoulou, and N. Mamassis, Case study of the data processing software on the Evinos river basin, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 6, 161 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.
  50. N. Mamassis, K. Nikolaou, G. Tsakalias, and Ch. Anyfanti, Data base and data processing software for monthly hydrologic data, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 5, 96 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.
  51. N. Stavridis, D Bokou, K. Alexopoulou, P. Anastassopoulou, and N. Mamassis, Rain gauge and hydrometric stations and data, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 2, 219 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.
  52. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Stage data of the Yliki and Paralimni Lakes, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report I, 123 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.
  53. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of the B. Kifisos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report Θ, 167 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.
  54. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Stochastic simulation of hydrological variables, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 13, 313 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.
  55. M. Aftias, C. Tsolakidis, and N. Mamassis, Water consumption of the greater Athens area, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 12, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, June 1990.
  56. S. Roti, N. Mamassis, and C. Tsolakidis, Hydrometeorological data processing of the Yliki basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 11, 167 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.
  57. S. Roti, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological stations of the Yliki greater area, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 10, 22 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.
  58. S. Roti, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Study of monthly hydrometeorological data, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report 6, 288 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 1989.
  59. J. Tzeranis, N. Mamassis, and S. Roti, Hydrometeorological Stations, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report 4, 55 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 1989.
  60. N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of Evinos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report ΣΤ, 231 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.
  61. N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of Mornos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report E, 80 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.
  62. N. Mamassis, and J. Tzeranis, Discharge measurements & stage-discharge curves of Mornos & Evinos basins, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report Δ, 113 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1988.
  63. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Raingage data of Evinos Basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report B, 237 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.
  64. K. Kouridakis, and N. Mamassis, Raingage data of Mornos Basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report A, 262 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.

Miscellaneous works

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water and energy in 21th century. Views on hydroelectric production, Conference of EYDAP employees union for the world water day, Athens, 21 March 2016.
  2. A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Comments on the proposal for a law on the renewable energy sources, 4 pages, 15 January 2010.
  3. A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Evaluating models or evaluating modelling practices? - Interactive comment on HESS Opinions “Crash tests for a standardized evaluation of hydrological models”, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, 6, C1404–C1409, 2009.

Engineering reports

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of flood hydrographs at selected streams crossing Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) – Section 1, Detailed design of TAP - Section 1, Commissioner: Asprofos Engineering, Contractors: , September 2016.
  2. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S. Baki, Y. Markonis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 205 pages, February 2013.
  3. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, S. Baki, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 144 pages, February 2013.
  4. N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Drought and water shortage study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki, 145 pages, June 2012.
  5. A. Stamou, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Technical Report, Investigation of the hydrographic network development in Mavro Vouno, Grammatiko, Attica, Greece, Commissioner: Perifereiako Tameio Anaptyxis Attikis, Contractors: A. Stamou, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 40 pages, Athens, 2012.
  6. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and P. Dimitriadis, Hydrological study of severe rainfall in the Kephisos basin, Greece, Study of the management of Kephisos , Commissioner: General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, Denco, G. Karavokiris, et al., 154 pages, Athens, 2010.
  7. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological study of Arachthos floods, Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta, Commissioner: Municipality of Arta, Contractors: ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers, YDROTEK, V. Mouzos, 272 pages, 2010.
  8. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Essential works to ensure the established ecological flow, Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractor: ECOS Consultants S.A., 22 pages, Athens, May 2009.
  9. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Investigation of ecological flow, Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractor: ECOS Consultants S.A., 88 pages, Athens, May 2009.
  10. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of the 12/2005-2/2006 in the region of Lower Acheloos in Aetoloacarnania, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 29 pages, June 2008.
  11. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food, Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co., Athens, 2006.
  12. D. Argyropoulos, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Rozos, Water resource management of Xerias and Yannouzagas basins, Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia, Commissioner: TEMES - Tourist Enterprises of Messinia, Contractor: D. Argyropoulos, 73 pages, Athens, 2005.
  13. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of December 1996 in the region of Lower Acheloos in Aetoloacarnania, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 18 pages, Athens, June 2005.
  14. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of December 2002 in the region of Limne Nesiou, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 13 pages, Athens, February 2005.
  15. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of March 1999 in the region of Limne Nesiou, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 12 pages, Athens, May 2005.
  16. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation, Diversion of the Soulou Stream for the Development of Lignite Exploitations of the Public Power Corporation in the Mine of Southern Field of Region Kozani-Ptolemais, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 18 pages, Public Power Corporation, Athens, 2004.
  17. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, M. Lasithiotakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, First monitoring programme for the estimation of water resources in the Pylos-Romanos area for the water supply of the ITDA , Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia, Commissioner: TEMES - Tourist Enterprises of Messinia, Contractor: D. Argyropoulos, 17 pages, Athens, 2003.
  18. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study of the Sperhios basin, Hydrological and hydraulic study for the flood protection of the new railway in the region of Sperhios river, Commissioner: ERGA OSE, Contractor: D. Soteropoulos, Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis, 197 pages, Athens, January 2003.
  19. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and A. Daniil, Flood study, Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam", Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Aposelemis Joint Venture, Athens, October 2001.
  20. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and L. Lazaridis, Hydrological study of reservoir operation, Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam", Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Aposelemis Joint Venture, Athens, October 2001.
  21. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Appraisal of the surface water potential and its exploitation in the Acheloos river basin and in Thessaly, Ch. 5 of Study of Hydrosystems, Complementary study of environmental impacts from the diversion of Acheloos to Thessaly, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki, Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis, 2001.
  22. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, D. Zarris, J. Gavriilidis, T. Papathanasiadis, and I. Nalbantis, Flow measurements and estimation of losses from DXX irrigation canal of Lower Acheloos, Estimation of losses from DXX canal in the irrigation network of Lower Acheloos, Commissioner: Division of Land Reclamation Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: NAMA, 20 pages, Division of Land Reclamation Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, 1999.
  23. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigations of the Santorine watersheds, Concerted actions for the sector of environment in Santorine and Therasia islands, Commissioner: Cohesion Fund EU, Contractors: NAMA, SPEED, VLAR, 1998.
  24. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation - Part B: Investigation of flow duration characteristics, Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Th. Gofas and Partners, Petra Synergatiki, D. Koutsoudakis, Helliniki Meletitiki, G. Kafetzopoulos - D. Benakis - I. Printatko, 100 pages, 1997.
  25. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation - Part A, Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Th. Gofas and Partners, Petra Synergatiki, D. Koutsoudakis, Helliniki Meletitiki, G. Kafetzopoulos - D. Benakis - I. Printatko, 148 pages, 1997.
  26. P. Panagopoulos, A. Dakanalis, K. Triantafillou, D. Mertziotis, I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, G. Tsakalias, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Final Report, Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: P. Panagopoulos, General Studies, Istria, Ecosystems Analysis, 1996.
  27. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological study, Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: P. Panagopoulos, General Studies, Istria, Ecosystems Analysis, Report number II, Athens, 1996.
  28. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Appraisal of the surface water potential and its exploitation in the Acheloos river basin and in Thessaly, Ch. 5 of Study of Hydrosystems, Integrated study of the environmental impacts from Acheloos diversion, Contractor: Directorate for Acheloos Diversion Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Collaborators: Ydroexigiantiki, 150 pages, 1995.
  29. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Annex, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 82 pages, 1991.
  30. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Appendices E-F, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 204 pages, 1991.
  31. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Appendices A-D, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 233 pages, 1991.
  32. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Report, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 192 pages, 1991.

Details on research projects

Participation as Project Director

  1. Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system

    Duration: October 2008–November 2011

    Budget: €72 000

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    This research project includes the maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System that developed by NTUA for EYDAP in the framework of the research project “Updating of the supervision and management of the water resources’ system for the water supply of the Athens’ metropolitan area”. The project is consisted of the following parts: (a) Upgrading of the Data Base, (b)Upgrading and extension of hydrometeorological network, (c) upgrading of the hydrometeorological data process software, (d) upgrading and extension of the Hydronomeas software, (e) hydrological data analysis and (f) support to the preparation of the annual master plans

  1. Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"

    Duration: December 2009–May 2011

    Budget: €140 000

    Commissioned by: Hydroscope Systems Consortium

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    The Ministry of Environment, Physical Planning & Public Works assigned to a consortium of consultancy companies the Project "Development of a new software platform for the management and operation of the National Databank for Hydrologic and Meteorological Information - 3rd Phase within a GIS environment and relevant dissemination actions". In the framework of the specific project a research team of NTUA undertakes a part as subcontractor. NTUA delivers methodologies for further development of the databases and applications of the Databank and their migration into a web platform (including the experimental node openmeteo.org for free data storage for the public). Specifically, using the knowhow that has been developed in the past by Research Teams from the Department of Water Resources of the School of Civil Engineering a database system and software applications (included hydrological models) are created fully adapted for operation over the Internet. NTUA's contribution is primarily on the design of the new system and the hydrological and geographical database the development of distibuted hydological models, the adaptation of the system to the WFD 2000/60/EC and on supporting dissemination activities. Finally NTUA will participate in the technical support and pilot operation of the project after its delivery from the consortium to the Ministry.

    More information is available at http://www.hydroscope.gr/.

  1. Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas

    Duration: April 2008–March 2009

    Budget: €30 000

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    The main purpose of the system is the supervision of the protected areas in Kephisos river basin. Using the applications that will be developed, the staff of Kephisos Institution will achieve the real time recording of various activities that are built up inside the limits of protection belts. Specifically, three main applications will be developed: (a) A Geographical Information System (GIS) (b) An General Positioning System Application (GPS) (c) An Internet application

Participation as Principal Investigator

  1. Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO)

    Duration: February 2014–July 2015

    Budget: €315 000

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Research and Technology

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    Programme: Αριστεία ΙΙ

    The project's objective is to develop a holistic framework for optimal planning and management of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems, in which hydropower plays the dominant role. The scale refers to both the size of energy units and their spatial extent, and is of major importance, as efficiency increases with scale, while uncertainty decreases. Outcomes of the research include a coherent stochastic-entropic theory for uncertainty assessment of the processes that are related to energy production (wind velocity, solar radiation, streamflow), and a parameterization-simulation-optimization scheme inspired from established system-based approaches for supporting optimal decision-making in complex water management problems. The whole framework is integrated within a decision support system (DSS), in which several software tools are integrated . The methodology and the DSS are tested at a large region that covers 12% of Greece, characterized by substantial hydropower potential. The study area is viewed as a closed and energy-autonomous system, in order to investigate the perspectives of sustainable development at a regional scale, using exclusively renewable energy sources. Following the principle of openness, we provide free accessibility to data, methods and tools, through a broad range of dissemination activities.

  1. DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Duration: March 2011–March 2014

    Budget: €145 000

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Research and Technology

    Contractors:

    1. ETME: Peppas & Collaborators
    2. Grafeio Mahera
    3. Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering
    4. National Observatory of Athens

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    Programme: ΕΣΠΑ "Συνεργασία"

    The project aims to develop a set of physically-based methodologies associated with modelling and forecasting of extreme rainfall events and the subsequent flood events, and adapted to the peculiarities of the hydroclimatic and geomorphological conditions of Greece. It includes the implementation of a set of research river basins that comprises a number of gauged basins in Greece and Cyprus with reliable measurements of adequate length, as well as three new experimental basins (with their sub-basins), which will be equipped with the necessary infrastructure. From the field data analysis (hydrological, meteorological, geographical) physically-established regional models will be devoloped for the estimation of characteristic hydrological design quantities, along with hydrological-hydraulic models, which will be integrated within an operational system for hydrometeorological forecasting. A framework of design criteria and methodologies (in a draft form for discussion) will be prepared for the elaboration of hydrological studies for flood-prevention works.

    Project web-page: http://deucalionproject.gr/

  1. Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Duration: November 2005–December 2006

    Budget: €60 000

    Commissioned by: Special Directorate for the Management of Corporate Programs of Thessaly

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    Programme: Επιχειρησιακά Σχέδια Διαχείρισης Δικτύων Σμοκόβου

Participation as Researcher

  1. Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens

    Duration: June 2010–December 2010

    Budget: €110 000

    Commissioned by: Fixed Assets Company EYDAP

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: C. Makropoulos

  1. EU COST Action C22: Urban Flood Management

    Duration: June 2005–December 2007

    Project director: C. Zevenbergen

    The primary objective is to increase knowledge required for prevention and mitigation of potential flood impacts to urban areas by exchanging experiences, developing integrated approaches, and by promoting the diffusion of best practices in Urban Flood Management. Secondary objectives are to develop holistic approaches in Urban Flood Management, to initiate R&D projects for the EU 7th Framework programme, to stimulate national R&D activities and to increase awareness of the importance of flood management. The action includes three phases: (1) inventory (state-of-the-art relevant aspects of UFM), (2) analysis and integration (best practices and knowledge gaps), and (3) dissimination and consolidation. The action involves four working groups: (1) models and tools to assess flood probability and measures to reduce probability, (2) models and tools to assess impact of flooding to decrease vulnerability, (3) flood recovery methods and methods of damage compensation, and (4) non-technical measures and techniques to decrease vulnerability.

  1. Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)

    Duration: July 2003–June 2006

    Budget: €779 656

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Research and Technology

    Contractor: NAMA

    Collaborators:

    1. Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering
    2. Municipal Company of Water Supply and Sewerage of Karditsa
    3. Aeiforiki Dodekanisou
    4. Marathon Data Systems

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: A. Andreadakis

    Programme: ΕΠΑΝ, Φυσικό Περιβάλλον και Βιώσιμη Ανάπτυξη

    The project aims at providing support to decision-making processes within the direction of integrated management of water resource systems at a variety of scales. Several methodologies and computing tools are developed, which are incorporated into an integrated information system. The main deliverable is an operational software package of general use, which is evaluated and tested on two pilot case studies, concerning hydrosystems in Greece with varying characteristics (Karditsa, Dodecanesus). The end-product of the project is a software system for simulation and optimisation of hydrosystem operation, as well as a series of separate software applications for solving specific problems, aiming at producing input data to the central system or post-processing of the results. The project includes eleven work packages, eight for basic research, two for industrial research and one for the pilot applications.

  1. Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Duration: March 1999–December 2003

    Commissioned by: Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Due to the dry climate of the surrounding region, Athens has suffered from frequent water shortages during its long history but now has acquired a reliable system for water supply. This extensive and complex water resource system extends over an area of around 4000 km2 and includes surface water and groundwater resources. It incorporates four reservoirs, 350 km of main aqueducts, 15 pumping stations and more than 100 boreholes. The water resource system also supplies secondary uses such as irrigation and water supply of nearby towns. The Athens Water Supply and Sewerage Company (EYDAP) that runs the system commissioned this project, which comprises: (a) development of a geographical information system for the representation and supervision of the external water supply system; (b) development of a measurement system for the water resources of Athens; (c) development of a system for the estimation and prediction of the water resource system of Athens utilising stochastic models; (d) development of a decision support system for the integrated management of water resource system of Athens using simulation-optimisation methodologies; and (e) cooperation and transfer of knowledge between NTUA and EYDAP.

    Products: 17 reports; 14 publications

  1. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece - Phases 1 and 2

    Duration: February 1996–April 2003

    Budget: €216 000

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigators: A. Andreadakis, D. Mamais

    The scope of the project is the classification of the existing information related to water quantity and quality in the water districts of Greece, using geographical information systems. The project part related to water quantity aims at the development of a methodology for establishing a water balance between supply and demand and extracting the most important summary characteristics that are then entered into a geographical information system. The methodology is applied at a water district scale, using information based on existing studies. The project part related to water quality aims at the characterisation of the rivers, lakes and aquifers based on the water quality characteristics, and the water uses and requirements. The characterisation is based on the classification of critical quantity parameters that have been measured and includes the use of a geographical information system. The project was elaborated in two phases. The first phase was implemented in 1996, and its objective was the development of methodologies, the analysis of the 10 water districts and their relationships and the creation of maps. In collaboration with other authorities (Ministry of Development, Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploitation, Centre for Research and Planning), the institutional and administrative status, the international environment and the water policies, were investigated. Finally a first approach towards the integrated management of the water resources of the country was attempted. The second phase was implemented in 2002-2003, and aims at the completion of the study, by incorporating the 4 remaining water districts, a more analytical approach regarding the water management at a country scale and the update of results of the first phase.

  1. Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Duration: May 2001–January 2002

    Commissioned by:

    1. Prefectural Government of Karditsa
    2. Municipality of Karditsa

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: K. Hadjibiros

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    To protect the Plastiras Lake, a high quality of the natural landscape and a satisfactory water quality must be ensured, the conflicting water uses and demands must be arranged and effective water management practices must be established. To this aim, the hydrology of the catchment is investigated, the geographical, meteorological and water power data are collected and processed, the water balance is studied and a stochastic model is constructed to support the study of alternative management scenarios. In addition, an analysis of the natural landscape is performed and the negative influences (e.g. dead tries) are determined and quantified using GIS. Furthermore, the water quality parameters are evaluated, the water quality state is assessed, the quantitative targets are determined, the pollution sources are identified and measures for the reduction of pollution are studied using a hydrodynamic model with emphasis on the nutrient status. Based on the results of these analyses, scenarios of safe water release are suggested.

  1. Assessment of sediment generation in Thriasio

    Duration: January 2001–December 2001

    Contractor: School of Civil Engineering

    Project director: P. Marinos

  1. Appraisal of river sediment deposits in reservoirs of hydropower dams

    Duration: February 1998–October 2001

    Commissioned by:

    1. General Secretariat of Research and Technology
    2. Public Power Corporation

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The objective of this research project is the estimation of the sediment deposits in reservoirs of hydropower dams. Specifically, an estimation of the volume of deposits in one of the reservoirs of the Public Power Corporation (the Kremasta Reservoir) is done using hydrographic methods. The estimation is used as a basis to calibrate a mathematical model of sediment discharge, which accounts for the processes involved such as soil erosion, sediment transport and deposition.

  1. National databank for hydrological and meteorological information - Hydroscope 2000

    Duration: January 1997–December 2000

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: M. Mimikou

    Principal investigators: D. Koutsoyiannis, M. Mimikou

  1. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3

    Duration: November 1996–December 2000

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The main objectives of the research project are the evaluation and management of the water resources, both surface and subsurface, of the Sterea Hellas region, and the systematic study of all parameters related to the rational development and management of the water resources of this region. Another objective of the project, considered as an infrastructure work, is the development of software for the hydrological, hydrogeological and operational simulation of the combined catchments of the study area. The development of the software and, at the same time, the development of methodologies suitable for the Greek conditions will assist in decision-making concerning the water resources management of Sterea Hellas and of other Greek regions. The project also aims at the improving of the cooperation between the National Technical University of Athens and the Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works. This is considered as a necessary condition for the continuous updating of the project results as well as for the rational analysis of the water resource problems of the Sterea Hellas region. The specific themes of Phase 3 are: (a) the completion of the information systems of the previous phases, which concerned hydrological and hydrogeological information, by including two additional levels of information related to the water uses and the water resources development works; (b) the development of methodologies for optimising the hydrosystems operation and the construction of integrated simulation and optimisation models for the two major hydrosystems of the study area (Western and Eastern Sterea Hellas); and (c) the integration of all computer systems (databases, geographical information systems, application models) into a unified system with collaborating components.

  1. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phases 1, 2, 3

    Duration: December 1990–December 2000

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project directors: D. Koutsoyiannis, Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigators: P. Marinos, I. Nalbantis

    The main objectives of the research project are the evaluation and management of the water resources, both surface and subsurface, of the Sterea Hellas region, and the systematic study of all parameters related to the rational development and management of the water resources of this region. Another objective of the project, considered as an infrastructure work, is the development of software for the hydrological, hydrogeological and operational simulation of the combined catchments of the study area. The development of the software and, at the same time, the development of methodologies suitable for the Greek conditions will assist in decision-making concerning the water resources management of Sterea Hellas and of other Greek regions. The project also aims at the improving of the cooperation between the National Technical University of Athens and the Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works. This is considered as a necessary condition for the continuous updating of the project results as well as for the rational analysis of the water resource problems of the Sterea Hellas region. The whole project is implemented in three phases. The objective of Phase 1 (December 1990 - November 1992) is the collection and the organising of the surface water data and the development of hydrological simulation programs. The themes of Phase 2 (November 1993 - October 1995) are: (a) the conversion of the databases of the previous phase into the new computer environment based on Unix and Windows workstations; (b) the conversion of the computer programs for statistical processing of hydrologic data into the new computer environment; (c) the development of software for hydrologic data processing and the processing of the Sterea Hellas data; (d) the development of a geographical information system for hydrological and hydrogeological information; (e) the review of existing studies regarding water uses; (f) the collection, evaluation and organising of hydrogeological data; and (g) the hydrogeological study of selected watersheds. Finally, the themes of Phase 3 (November 1996 - December 2000) are: (a) the completion of the information systems of the previous phases, which concerned hydrological and hydrogeological information, by including two additional levels of information related to the water uses and the water resources development works; (b) the development of methodologies for optimising the hydrosystems operation and the construction of integrated simulation and optimisation models for the two major hydrosystems of the study area (Western and Eastern Sterea Hellas); and (c) the integration of all computer systems (databases, geographical information systems, application models) into a unified system with collaborating components.

  1. Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia

    Duration: February 1997–January 1999

    Commissioned by: Department of Hydrogeology, Boreholes and Mathematical Models

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: I. Nalbantis

    The project aims at the modernisation of the archive of surface and subsurface water related data of the Ministry of Agriculture in the Thessalia region (mainly data on quantities of the drafts from both surface waters and groundwater pumped from public or private boreholes). It also includes the data organisation into a geographical information system and the data evaluation and processing, from which the evapotranspiration of the area is estimated using semi-empirical methods.

  1. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems

    Duration: February 1996–September 1996

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Collaborators:

    1. Directorate of Water and Natural Resources
    2. Institute of Geological and Mining Research
    3. Centre for Research and Planning

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: A. Andreadakis

    The project part related to water quantity aims at the development of a methodology for establishing a water balance between supply and demand and extracting the most important summary characteristics that are then entered into a geographical information system. The methodology is applied to characteristic areas (water districts) of Greece with adequacy of information (based on existing studies). The project part related to water quality aims at the characterisation of the rivers, lakes and aquifers based on the water quality characteristics, and the water uses and requirements. The characterisation is based on the classification of critical quantity parameters that have been measured and includes the use of a geographical information system.

  1. Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Duration: April 1993–September 1995

    Commissioned by:

    1. Ministry of Agriculture
    2. Ministry of the Industry
    3. Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works
    4. Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens
    5. Public Power Corporation

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    This project is complementary to the major Hydroscope project. Its objectives are the purchase of computational infrastructure and the pilot data entry into the databank that is developed in the framework of the major project. The data entered provides a means for testing of the operation of the distributed database and the wide area network, and the operational use of the related infrastructure.

  1. Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river

    Duration: January 1995–May 1995

    Commissioned by: European Union

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: M. Bonazountas

    Programme: LIFE

  1. AFORISM: A comprehensive forecasting system for flood risk mitigation and control

    Duration: June 1991–May 1994

    Budget: 17 300 000 DRS (about €83 900)

    Commissioned by: DGXII / FP6-SUSTDEV-2005-3.II.1.2

    Contractor: University of Bologna

    Collaborators:

    1. National Technical University of Athens
    2. Ente Regionale di Sciluppo Agricolo
    3. University College Cork
    4. University of Newcastle
    5. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
    6. Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Lisbon
    7. Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Programme: EPOCH

    The aim of this project is the development of a comprehensive flood forecasting system and the study of alternative management policies intending to flood risk mitigation. The Greek research team contributes to AFORISM in the following tasks: (a) the analysis of intense rainfall events and their classification by weather type as well as the modelling of intense rainfall and the production of alternative hyetographs of temporal evolution of rainfall; (b) the comparison of the alternative rainfall-runoff models, using multiple time steps in modelling rainfall-runoff and applying it to Greek hydrological basins. The contribution of the other research teams deal with: (a) the forecasting of spatial-temporal evolution of rainfall using limited area models; (b) the development of optimisation models in order to mitigate flood risks; (c) the development of an expert system for flood management; (d) the development of a geographical information system for visualisation of the evaluation of flood and its consequences; and (e) the integration of the forecast and control system in the Reno basin (Italy).

  1. Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Duration: January 1992–December 1993

    Budget: 394 238 400 DRS (about €1 600 000)

    Commissioned by:

    1. General Secretariat of Research and Technology
    2. Ministry of the Industry
    3. Hellenic National Meteorological Service
    4. Ministry of Agriculture
    5. Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works
    6. National Observatory of Athens
    7. Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens
    8. National Centre for Scientific Research "Democritos"
    9. Ministry of National Education

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Collaborators:

    1. Division of Hydraulics and Environmental Engineering
    2. Division of Applications Physics
    3. Energy Division
    4. Hellenic National Meteorological Service
    5. Department for the Development of Hydroelectric Works
    6. Directorate of Water and Natural Resources
    7. General Secretariat of Land Reclamation Works and Agricultural Structures
    8. General Secretariat of Public Works
    9. Institute of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment
    10. Centre for Renewable Energy Sources
    11. Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens
    12. National Centre for Scientific Research "Democritos"
    13. Greek Corporation of Regional Governent and Development

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigators: M. Aftias, D. Koutsoyiannis

    Programme: STRIDE

    The main objective of HYDROSCOPE is the creation of a modern information infrastructure for the hydrological cycle in Greece. Specifically, it aims at organising and systematising the hydrological, hydrogeological and meteorological information using the capacities that are provided by the modern methods and techniques of computer science and telecommunications. The database, which will be built, will contribute to the reliable programming, planning and management of the water resources of the country, the mitigation of phenomena like flood and drought, the evaluation of hydroclimatic parameters and their effects to the natural and biological environment, the diagnosis of climatic changes as well as the prediction and the control of the air pollution and the groundwater and surface water pollution. The development of a unified synergistic network, the information exchange and the co-ordination of the activities of the participating organisations, which are involved with the components of the hydrological cycle (Universities, Research Centres, Ministries and Services) as well as the reorganisation and standardisation of the hydrometeorological networks' function are considered as indirect but essential benefits. The programme includes: (a) hardware equipment, to install a network with 13 major nodes (RISC Workstations with Unix operation system) in Athens and Thessaloniki, local networks of PCs in each node, private high speed wide area network using routers and leased telephone lines, (b) infrastructure software, and specifically, distributed relational data base and graphic environment for applications' development, and (c) application software, and specifically, a distributed database system and applications concerning the input, the supervision and the processing of data in a graphic environment. This distributed database system provides firstly, the autonomy of each participant in managing data and secondly, a transparent, relatively to the data position, access. In addition, the project includes the locating of the available hydrological, hydrogeological and meteorological data that is maintained by the participants and the determination of the volume, the form and the reliability of measurements. Finally, a significant part of HYDROSCOPE deals with the development and the standardisation of methodologies regarding the processing as well as the pilot data entry of a part of the hydrological, hydrogeological and meteorological information aiming at the testing of the methodologies and systems.

  1. A pilot study for the water resources management of the Epirus water district

    Duration: September 1991–September 1993

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Collaborators:

    1. Directorate of Water and Natural Resources
    2. Delft Hydraulics
    3. Ecosystems Analysis

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: I. Nalbantis

    The main objective is to obtain an insight of the interrelation of the water balance components of the Epirus water district. The methodology is based on an earlier project regarding the water resources of the Louros and Arachthos watersheds. The role of the research team of the National Technical University of Athens is to supervise the project and evaluate its results at each stage of the project.

  1. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1

    Duration: December 1990–November 1992

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The main objectives of the research project are the evaluation and management of the water resources, both surface and subsurface, of the Sterea Hellas region, and the systematic study of all parameters related to the rational development and management of the water resources of this region. Another objective of the project, considered as an infrastructure work, is the development of software for the hydrological, hydrogeological and operational simulation of the combined catchments of the study area. The development of the software and, at the same time, the development of methodologies suitable for the Greek conditions will assist in decision-making concerning the water resources management of Sterea Hellas and of other Greek regions. The project also aims at the improving of the cooperation between the National Technical University of Athens and the Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works. This is considered as a necessary condition for the continuous updating of the project results as well as for the rational analysis of the water resource problems of the Sterea Hellas region. The specific objective of Phase 1 is the collection and the organising of the surface water data and the development of hydrological simulation programs.

  1. A pilot study for the management of the Louros and Arachthos watersheds

    Duration: June 1989–April 1991

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Collaborators:

    1. Directorate of Water and Natural Resources
    2. Delft Hydraulics

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The objective of the pilot study is the combined management of the surface and subsurface water resources of the Louros and Arachthos watersheds. The main target is to obtain an insight of the interrelation of the relevant quantities, to draw conclusions regarding the management of water resources of the two catchments, and to locate the issues that will require further research. An additional objective is the development of a methodology for water resources planning and management, which can be applied to other watersheds or water districts in Greece.

  1. Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Duration: May 1989–June 1990

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The project includes the following main components: (1) Processing and analysis of the available hydrometeorological data and estimation of the water potential of the Mornos, Evinos and Yliki watersheds. (2) Hydrologic design study of alternative reservoirs in the Evinos River basin combined with the operation of the Mornos reservoir. (3) Study for improving of the hydrometeorological measuring system at Mornos and Evinos watersheds. (4) Evaluation of the exploitable water potential of the Yliki Lake and the alternative rational ways of its management, both under the current conditions and future conditions, without or with the Evinos reservoir. (5) Development of methodologies and computer programs for the support of the rational scheduling of the water release from Yliki.

  1. Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Duration: November 1987–February 1989

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    This project aims at organising the hydrological information in the Mornos and Evinos watersheds, and more specifically, the collection, the evaluation, the archiving and the processing of hydrometeorological data of these basins. The project also deals with the estimation of the actual release capacity of the Mornos reservoir and the appraisal of the alternatives for improving it by diverting water from the Evinos River.

  1. Hydrological investigation of the Thessalia water basin

    Duration: July 1986–October 1988

    Commissioned by: Division of Acheloos Diversion Works

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: Th. Xanthopoulos

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The project aims at organising the hydrological information in the Thessalia water district, and more specifically, the collection, the evaluation, the archiving and the processing of hydrometeorological data of the district. The project also deals with the development of an appropriate hydrological infrastructure (criteria and hydrologic design parameters) to support the studies of the works for the development of the Thessalia Plain (irrigation projects, flood protection works and dams) also considering the planned diversion of the Acheloos River.

Details on engineering studies

  1. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Ανατολικής Πελοποννήσου (GR03)

    Commissioned by: Specific Secreteriat of Water

    Contractor: ADT-OMEGA

  1. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Βόρειας Πελοποννήσου (GR02)

    Commissioned by: Specific Secreteriat of Water

    Contractor: ADT-OMEGA

  1. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Κρήτης (GR13)

    Commissioned by: Specific Secreteriat of Water

    Contractor: ADT-OMEGA

  1. Σχέδιο Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών του Υδατικού Διαμερίσματος Δυτικής Πελοποννήσου (GR01)

    Commissioned by: Specific Secreteriat of Water

    Contractor: ADT-OMEGA

  1. Παροχή Συμβουλευτικών Υπηρεσιών για την Κατάρτιση του 2ου Σχεδίου Διαχείρισης Λεκάνης Απορροής Ποταμού της Κύπρου για την Εφαρμογή της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ και για την Κατάρτιση του Σχεδίου Διαχείρισης Κινδύνων Πλημμύρας για την Εφαρμογή της Οδηγίας 2007/60

    Commissioned by: Depatment of Water Development of Cyprus

    Contractor: LDK & ECOS

  1. Investigation of the hydrographic network development in Mavro Vouno, Grammatiko, Attica, Greece

    Duration: May 2012–June 2012

    Budget: €15 000

    Commissioned by: Perifereiako Tameio Anaptyxis Attikis

    Contractors:

    1. A. Stamou
    2. D. Koutsoyiannis
    3. N. Mamassis

  1. Water supply works from Gadouras dam - Phase B

    Duration: July 2009–July 2010

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki

  1. Study of the management of Kephisos

    Duration: June 2009–April 2010

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Public Works

    Contractors:

    1. Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson
    2. Denco
    3. G. Karavokiris
    4. et al.

  1. Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta

    Duration: January 2009–February 2010

    Commissioned by: Municipality of Arta

    Contractors:

    1. ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers
    2. YDROTEK
    3. V. Mouzos

  1. Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos

    Duration: January 2009–June 2009

    Commissioned by: Public Power Corporation

    Contractor: ECOS Consultants S.A.

  1. Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας

    Duration: January 2006–December 2006

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food

    Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co.

  1. Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia

    Duration: January 2003–December 2005

    Commissioned by: TEMES - Tourist Enterprises of Messinia

    Contractor: D. Argyropoulos

  1. Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos

    Duration: September 2004–June 2005

    Budget: €21 000

    Commissioned by: Public Power Corporation

    Contractors:

    1. D. Koutsoyiannis
    2. N. Mamassis

  1. Diversion of the Soulou Stream for the Development of Lignite Exploitations of the Public Power Corporation in the Mine of Southern Field of Region Kozani-Ptolemais

    Duration: September 2004–October 2004

    Budget: €3 000

    Commissioned by: Public Power Corporation

    Contractors:

    1. D. Koutsoyiannis
    2. N. Mamassis

  1. Hydrological and hydraulic study for the flood protection of the new railway in the region of Sperhios river

    Duration: October 2002–January 2003

    Budget: €90 000

    Commissioned by: ERGA OSE

    Contractor: D. Soteropoulos

    Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis

  1. Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam"

    Duration: October 2000–December 2002

    Budget: €1 782 000

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractor: Aposelemis Joint Venture

  1. Consultative service for the spring "Kephalovriso" in Kaloskope

    Duration: May 2000–December 2001

    Commissioned by: Association of Kaloskopi Parnassidas

  1. Complementary study of environmental impacts from the diversion of Acheloos to Thessaly

    Duration: December 2000–February 2001

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki

    Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis

  1. Estimation of losses from DXX canal in the irrigation network of Lower Acheloos

    Duration: January 1999–December 1999

    Commissioned by: Division of Land Reclamation Works

    Contractor: NAMA

  1. Concerted actions for the sector of environment in Santorine and Therasia islands

    Duration: November 1998–December 1998

    Commissioned by: Cohesion Fund EU

    Contractors:

    1. NAMA
    2. SPEED
    3. VLAR

  1. Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa

    Duration: January 1997–December 1997

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractors:

    1. Th. Gofas and Partners
    2. Petra Synergatiki
    3. D. Koutsoudakis
    4. Helliniki Meletitiki
    5. G. Kafetzopoulos - D. Benakis - I. Printatko

  1. Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system

    Duration: January 1996–December 1996

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractors:

    1. P. Panagopoulos
    2. General Studies
    3. Istria
    4. Ecosystems Analysis

  1. Integrated study of the environmental impacts from Acheloos diversion

    Duration: September 1995–December 1995

    Contractor: Directorate for Acheloos Diversion Works

    Collaborators: Ydroexigiantiki

  1. Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

    Duration: January 1991–December 1991

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractors:

    1. OTME
    2. Ydroilektriki
    3. YDROTEK
    4. D. Constantinidis
    5. G. Karavokiris
    6. Th. Gofas and Partners

Published work in detail

Publications in scientific journals

  1. H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, A. Delichatsiou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A perpetually interrupted interbasin water transfer as a modern Greek drama: Assessing the Acheloos to Pinios interbasin water transfer in the context of integrated water resources management, Open Water Journal, 4 (1), 113–128, 12, 2017.

    Interbasin water transfer is a primary instrument of water resources management directly related with the integrated development of the economy, society and environment. Here we assess the project of the interbasin water transfer from the river Acheloos to the river Pinios basin which has intrigued the Greek society, the politicians and scientists for decades. Te set of criteria we apply originate from a previous study reviewing four interbasin water transfers and assessing whether an interbasin water transfer is compatible with the concept of integrated water resources management. In this respect, we assess which of the principles of the integrated water resources management the Acheloos to Pinios interbasin water transfer project does or does not satisfy. While the project meets the criteria of real surplus and deficit, of sustainability and of sound science, i.e., the criteria mostly related to the engineering part, it fails to meet the criteria of good governance and balancing of existing rights with needs, i.e., the criteria associated with social aspects of the project. Te non-fulfillment of the latter criteria is the consequence of chronic diseases of the Greek society, which become obvious in the case study

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1702/1/documents/2017OW_AcheloosToPiniosInterbasinWaterTransfer.pdf (2744 KB)

    See also: http://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/openwater/vol4/iss1/11/

  1. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial analysis of the electrical energy demand in Greece, Energy Policy, 102 (340-352), doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2016.12.033, March 2017.

    The Electrical Energy Demand (EED) of the agricultural, commercial and industrial sector in Greece, as well as its use for domestic activities, public and municipal authorities and street lighting are analysed spatially using Geographical Information System and spatial statistical methods. The analysis is performed on data which span from 2008 to 2012 and have annual temporal resolution and spatial resolution down to the NUTS (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) level 3. The aim is to identify spatial patterns of the EED and its transformations such as the ratios of the EED to socioeconomic variables, i.e. the population, the total area, the population density and the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Based on the analysis, Greece is divided in five regions, each one with a different development model, i.e. Attica and Thessaloniki which are two heavily populated major poles, Thessaly and Central Greece which form a connected geographical region with important agricultural and industrial sector, the islands and some coastal areas which are characterized by an important commercial sector and the rest Greek areas. The spatial patterns can provide additional information for policy decision about the electrical energy management and better representation of the regional socioeconomic conditions.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1674/1/documents/electr_GIS_R_2016.pdf (2357 KB)

  1. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial Analysis of Electrical Energy Demand Patterns in Greece: Application of a GIS-based Methodological Framework, Energy Procedia, 97 (262-269), 8 pages, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2016.10.071, November 2016.

    We investigate various uses of the Electrical Energy Demand (EED) in Greece (agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial use) and we examine their relationships with variables such as population and the Gross Domestic Product. The analysis is performed on data from the year 2012 and have spatial resolution down to the level of prefecture. We both visualize the results of the analysis and we perform spatial cluster and outlier analysis. The definition of the spatial patterns of the aforementioned variables in a GIS environment provides insight of the regional development model in Greece.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1672/1/documents/SpatialAnalyis.pdf (1019 KB)

  1. K. Kollyropoulos, F. Georma, F. Saranti, N. Mamassis, and I. Kalavrouziotis, Urban planning and water management in Ancient Aetolian Makyneia, Western Greece, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 16 (5), doi:DOI: 10.2166/ws.2016.145 , September 2016.

    The findings of a large – scale archaeological investigation, conducted from 2009 to 2013 at a site in the vicinity of Antirrion – Western Greece, identified with ancient Makyneia, provides interesting information on the architectural features and urban planning of an ancient settlement in this area of mainland Western Greece. Through an interdisciplinary study of its morphological and technological characteristics water management problems and solutions can be revealed by the water management infrastructure (waterways, water reservoirs drainage systems etc.) as it has been documented during the excavation, An interesting question to investigate is whether water management systems of the ancient settlement represent sustainable techniques and principles that can still be used today. To this aim the functioning of systems is reconstructed and characteristic quantities are calculated both for the potable water system and the drainage system.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1669/1/documents/WS-EM16213R2.pdf (823 KB)

  1. P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, A. Oikonomou, V. Pagana, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping, Journal of Hydrology, 534, 478–492, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.01.020, 2016.

    One-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional hydraulic freeware models (HEC-RAS, LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2d) are widely used for flood inundation mapping. These models are tested on a benchmark test with a mixed rectangular-triangular channel cross section. Using a Monte-Carlo approach, we employ extended sensitivity analysis by simultaneously varying the input discharge, longitudinal and lateral gradients and roughness coefficients, as well as the grid cell size. Based on statistical analysis of three output variables of interest, i.e. water depths at the inflow and outflow locations and total flood volume, we investigate the uncertainty enclosed in different model configurations and flow conditions, without the influence of errors and other assumptions on topography, channel geometry and boundary conditions. Moreover, we estimate the uncertainty associated to each input variable and we compare it to the overall one. The outcomes of the benchmark analysis are further highlighted by applying the three models to real-world flood propagation problems, in the context of two challenging case studies in Greece.

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Apel, H., O. Martínez Trepat, N. N. Hung, D. T. Chinh, B. Merz, and N. V. Dung, Combined fluvial and pluvial urban flood hazard analysis: concept development and application to Can Tho city, Mekong Delta, Vietnam, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 16, 941-961, doi:10.5194/nhess-16-941-2016, 2016.
    2. Papaioannou , G., A. Loukas, L. Vasiliades, and G. T. Aronica, Flood inundation mapping sensitivity to riverine spatial resolution and modelling approach, Natural Hazards, 83, 117-132, doi:10.1007/s11069-016-2382-1, 2016.
    3. #Santillan, J. R., A. M. Amora, M. Makinano-Santillan, J. T. Marqueso, L. C. Cutamora, J. L. Serviano, and R. M. Makinano, Assessing the impacts of flooding caused by extreme rainfall events through a combined geospatial and numerical modeling approach, The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, Vol. XLI-B8, 2016, XXIII ISPRS Congress, Prague, doi:10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-1271-2016, 2016.
    4. Cheviron, B. and R. Moussa, Determinants of modelling choices for 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamics in hydrology and hydraulics: a review, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 20, 3799-3830, doi:10.5194/hess-20-3799-2016, 2016.
    5. Mohd Talha Anees, K. Abdullah, M.N.M. Nawawi, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab Rahman, Abd. Rahni Mt. Piah, Nor Azazi Zakaria, M.I. Syakir, and A.K. Mohd. Omar, Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis, Journal of African Earth Sciences, 124, 478–486, doi:10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2016.10.001, 2016.
    6. Skublics, D., G. Blöschl, and P. Rutschmann, Effect of river training on flood retention of the Bavarian Danube, Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics, 64(4), 349-356, doi:10.1515/johh-2016-0035, 2016.
    7. Doong, D.-J., W. Lo, Z. Vojinovic, W.-L. Lee, and S.-P. Lee, Development of a new generation of flood inundation maps—A case study of the coastal City of Tainan, Taiwan, Water, 8(11), 521, doi:10.3390/w8110521, 2016.
    8. #Cartaya, S., and R. Mantuano-Eduarte, Identificación de zonas en riesgo de inundación mediante la simulación hidráulica en un segmento del Río Pescadillo, Manabí, Ecuador, Revista de Investigación, 40(89), 158-170, 2016.
    9. Javadnejad, F., B. Waldron, and A. Hill, LITE Flood: Simple GIS-based mapping approach for real-time redelineation of multifrequency floods, Natural Hazards Review, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)NH.1527-6996.0000238, 2017.
    10. Shrestha, A., M. S. Babel, S. Weesakul, and Z. Vojinovic, Developing intensity–duration–frequency (IDF) curves under climate change uncertainty: The case of Bangkok, Thailand, Water, 9(2), 145, doi:10.3390/w9020145, 2017.
    11. Roushangar, K., M. T. Alami, V. Nourani, and A. Nouri, A cost model with several hydraulic constraints for optimizing in practice a trapezoidal cross section, Journal of Hydroinformatics, 19(3), 456-468, doi:10.2166/hydro.2017.081, 2017.
    12. Papaioannou, G., L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, and G. T. Aronica, Probabilistic flood inundation mapping at ungauged streams due to roughness coefficient uncertainty in hydraulic modelling, Advances in Geosciences, 44, 23-34, doi:10.5194/adgeo-44-23-2017, 2017.

  1. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Malamos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Evaluation of a parametric approach for estimating potential evapotranspiration across different climates, Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia, 4, 2–9, doi:10.1016/j.aaspro.2015.03.002, 2015.

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is key input in water resources, agricultural and environmental modelling. For many decades, numerous approaches have been proposed for the consistent estimation of PET at several time scales of interest. The most recognized is the Penman-Monteith formula, which is yet difficult to apply in data-scarce areas, since it requires simultaneous observations of four meteorological variables (temperature, sunshine duration, humidity, wind velocity). For this reason, parsimonious models with minimum input data requirements are strongly preferred. Typically, these have been developed and tested for specific hydroclimatic conditions, but when they are applied in different regimes they provide much less reliable (and in some cases misleading) estimates. Therefore, it is essential to develop generic methods that remain parsimonious, in terms of input data and parameterization, yet they also allow for some kind of local adjustment of their parameters, through calibration. In this study we present a recent parametric formula, based on a simplified formulation of the original Penman-Monteith expression, which only requires mean daily or monthly temperature data. The method is evaluated using meteorological records from different areas worldwide, at both the daily and monthly time scales. The outcomes of this extended analysis are very encouraging, as indicated by the substantially high validation scores of the proposed approach across all examined data sets. In general, the parametric model outperforms well-established methods of the everyday practice, since it ensures optimal approximation of potential evapotranspiration.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1549/1/documents/IRLA_paper.pdf (560 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aaspro.2015.03.002

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Stan, F.I., G. Neculau, L. Zaharia, G. Ioana-Toroimac, and S. Mihalache, Study on the evaporation and evapotranspiration measured on the Căldăruşani Lake (Romania), Procedia Environmental Sciences, 32, 281–289, doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2016.03.033, 2016.
    2. Esquivel-Hernández, G., R. Sánchez-Murillo, C. Birkel, S. P. Good, and J. Boll, Hydro-climatic and ecohydrological resistance/resilience conditions across tropical biomes of Costa Rica, Ecohydrology, doi:10.1002/eco.1860, 2017.

  1. N. Mamassis, S. Moustakas, and N. Zarkadoulas, Representing the operation of ancient reclamation works at Lake Copais in Greece, Water History, doi:10.1007/s12685-015-0126-x, 2015.

    Water has been playing a vital role in Greeks’ life during their long history. Ancient Greek societies were very active towards water management, having presented an impressive variety of hydraulic works. The main purpose of this paper is to represent the operation of one of the most ancients and extended hydraulic works. The drainage project of Lake Copais (is located in Central Greece) was developed and operated by Minyans, a powerful Mycenaean race. Minyans, partially diverted two large rivers which fed the lake. The water was conveyed towards labyrinthine natural sinkholes, which were formed in limestone terrain. Through sinkholes the water slowly discharged to the sea. This impressive ancient water management system of Copais has gained the attention of many scientists and has been extensively studied by archaeologists and engineers. Still important questions exist about the way that the hydrosystem worked. Trying to provide some reliable answers, we have attempted to study the Minyans’ interventions to hydrosystem, from a hydraulics engineers’ perspective. All the available archeological, hydrological and geological information of the area was used, to evaluate the operation of the hydrosystem. The main elements of the hydrosystem, are presented here and their purpose is examined. For this, (i) a water balance model was developed and (ii) the hydrosystem was simulated using synthetic time series of the hydrological processes. Several operational cases were examined in order to define critical parameters of the system, such as the Copais’ water level variation and the water accumulation at the sinkholes’ area. The analysis reveals some significant factors, which were combined with the archaeological findings, to lead us to some interesting conclusions for hydrosystem’s performance.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1539/1/documents/Copais_WH10_9_14.pdf (1516 KB)

  1. A. N. Angelakis, N. Mamassis, E. Dialynas, and P. Defteraios, Urban Water Supply, Wastewater, and Stormwater Considerations in Ancient Hellas: Lessons Learned, Environment and Natural Resources Research, 4 (3), doi:10.5539/enrr.v4n3p95, October 2014.

    Urban water, wastewater and stormwater management practices in ancient Hellas, from the Minoan to the Roman times are briefly reviewed. In the Prehistoric Hellas palaces and other settlements tended to be located at dry places, at a distance from rivers or lakes. During the Bronze Age decentralized water supply and wastewater and stormwater management of small-scale systems were dominant. These systems are characterized by their salient architectural and hydraulic features and perfect adaptation to the environment. On the other hand, under tyranny, cities grew significantly and the first large-scale urban water infrastructures were developed. During the periods of democracy the Hippodameian system of city planning included the public hydraulic works. This period is also characterized by significant scientific progress in the hygienic use of water in public baths and latrines. Finally, Romans used the scientific knowledge and the experience of small scale constructions of the Hellenes, to construct large scale hydraulic works using sophisticated techniques.

  1. N. Mamassis, D. Panagoulia, and A. Novcovic, Sensitivity analysis of Penman evaporation method, Global Network for Environmental Science and Technology, 16, May 2014, (in press).

    In this paper the influence of key meteorological variables in Penman evaporation method was explored. Monthly data over a 16-years period (1993-2008)were used from Thissio-Athens meteorological station. The climatic parameters of surface air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and sunshine duration were varied in Penman method and the obtained results were compared. Moreover, the investigationof sunshine duration during winter months was thoroughly examined. An open source software (Hydrognomon) was used for this exploration. The analysis showed that: (a) the influence of the meteorological parameters to evaporation is almost linear, (b) the temperature has the greater influence to annual evaporation while the relative humidity, wind speed and sunshine duration follow, and (c) the relationship between sunshine duration and evaporation in a monthly scale is not constant. During the winter months the increase of sunshine duration leads to decrease of evaporation. The performed analysis could be used to quantify the impact of climatic change on evaporation, to determine the accuracy of predicted evaporation against that obtained from the meteorological instruments, and to investigate the alternative values of several meteorological variables in the case of limited data sets.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1456/1/documents/gnest_01321_proof.pdf (1302 KB)

  1. K. Zotalis, E. Dialynas, N. Mamassis, and A. N. Angelakis, Desalination Technologies: Hellenic Experience, Water, 6 (5), 1134–1150, doi:10.3390/w6051134, 30 April 2014.

    Beyond doubt, desalination is growing rapidly worldwide. However, there are still obstacles to its wider implementation and acceptance such as: (a) high costs and energy use for fresh water production; (b) environmental impacts from concentrate disposal; (c) a complex, convoluted and time-consuming project permitting process; and (d) limited public understanding of the role, importance, benefits and environmental challenges of desalination. In this paper, a short review of desalination in Greece is being made. Data on the cost of desalination shows a decrease in the future and the potential of water desalination in Greece. The paper summarizes the current status in southeastern Greece (e.g., Aegean islands and Crete), and investigates the possibility of production of desalinated water from brackish water.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Flood design recipes vs. reality: can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted?, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 14, 1417–1428, doi:10.5194/nhess-14-1417-2014, 2014.

    Despite the great scientific and technological advances in flood hydrology, everyday engineering practices still follow simplistic approaches that are easy to formally implement in ungauged areas. In general, these "recipes" have been developed many decades ago, based on field data from typically few experimental catchments. However, many of them have been neither updated nor validated across all hydroclimatic and geomorphological conditions. This has an obvious impact on the quality and reliability of hydrological studies, and, consequently, on the safety and cost of the related flood protection works. Preliminary results, based on historical flood data from Cyprus and Greece, indicate that a substantial revision of many aspects of flood engineering procedures is required, including the regionalization formulas as well as the modelling concepts themselves. In order to provide a consistent design framework and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk (a key issue of the 2007/60/EU Directive) in ungauged basins, it is necessary to rethink the current engineering practices. In this vein, the collection of reliable hydrological data would be essential for re-evaluating the existing "recipes", taking into account local peculiarities, and for updating the modelling methodologies as needed.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1413/7/documents/nhess-14-1417-2014.pdf (207 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/14/1417/2014/

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. van Emmerik, T. H. M., G. Mulder, D. Eilander, M. Piet, and H. Savenije, Predicting the ungauged basin: Model validation and realism assessment, Frontiers in Earth Sciences, 3:62, doi:10.3389/feart.2015.00062, 2015.
    2. Biondi, D., and L. Da Luca, Process-based design flood estimation in ungauged basins by conditioning model parameters on regional hydrological signatures, Natural Hazards, 79(2), 1015-1038, doi:10.1007/s11069-015-1889-1, 2015.
    3. Yannopoulos, S., E. Eleftheriadou, S. Mpouri, and I. Giannopoulou, Implementing the requirements of the European Flood Directive: the case of ungauged and poorly gauged watersheds, Environmental Processes, 2(1), 191-207, doi:10.1007/s40710-015-0094-2, 2015.
    4. Wałęga, A., and A. Rutkowska, Usefulness of the modified NRCS-CN method for the assessment of direct runoff in a mountain catchment, Acta Geophysica, 63(5), 1423–1446, doi:10.1515/acgeo-2015-0043, 2015.
    5. Walega, A., B. Michalec, A. Cupak, and M. Grzebinoga, Comparison of SCS-CN determination methodologies in a heterogeneous catchment, Journal of Mountain Science, 12(5), 1084-1094, doi:10.1007/s11629-015-3592-9, 2015.
    6. Petroselli, A., and S. Grimaldi, Design hydrograph estimation in small and fully ungauged basins: a preliminary assessment of the EBA4SUB framework, Journal of Flood Risk Management, doi:10.1111/jfr3.12193, 2015.
    7. Awadallah, A.G., H. Saad, A. Elmoustafa, and A. Hassan, Reliability assessment of water structures subject to data scarcity using the SCS-CN model, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(4), 696-710, doi:10.1080/02626667.2015.1027709, 2016.
    8. Merheb, M., R. Moussa, C. Abdallah, F. Colin, C. Perrin, and N. Baghdadi, Hydrological response characteristics of Mediterranean catchments at different time scales: a meta-analysis, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(14), 2520-2539, doi:10.1080/02626667.2016.1140174, 2016.
    9. Kjeldsen, T., H. Kim, C. Jang, and H. Lee, Evidence and implications of nonlinear flood response in a small mountainous watershed, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 21(8), 04016024, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001343, 2016.
    10. Taghvaye Salimi, E., A. Nohegar, A. Malekian, M. Hoseini, and A. Holisaz, Estimating time of concentration in large watersheds, Paddy and Water Environment, 15(1), 123-132, doi:10.1007/s10333-016-0534-2, 2017.
    11. Biondi, D., and D. L. De Luca, Rainfall-runoff model parameter conditioning on regional hydrological signatures: application to ungauged basins in southern Italy, Hydrology Research, doi:10.2166/nh.2016.097, 2016.
    12. Attakora-Amaniampong, E., E. Owusu-Sekyere, and D. Aboagye, Urban floods and residential rental values nexus in Kumasi, Ghana, Ghana Journal of Development Studies, 13(2), 176-194, 2016.
    13. #Destro, E., E. I. Nikolopoulos, J. D. Creutin, and M. Borga, Floods, Environmental Hazards Methodologies for Risk Assessment and Management, Dalezios, N. R. (editor), Chapter 4, IWA Publishing, 2017.
    14. van Noordwijk, M., L. Tanika, L., and B. Lusiana, Flood risk reduction and flow buffering as ecosystem services – Part 1: Theory on flow persistence, flashiness and base flow, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 21, 2321-2340, doi:10.5194/hess-21-2321-2017, 2017.

  1. N. Efthimiou, S. Alexandris, C Karavitis, and N. Mamassis, Comparative analysis of reference evapotranspiration estimation between various methods and the FAO56 Penman - Monteith procedure , European Water, 42 (19-34), 2013.

    This study aimed to assess the performance of nine empirical methods [FAO-24 Penman (1977), Makkink (1957), Turc (1961), Penman (1963), Priestley-Taylor (1972), Linacre (1977), Kimberly Penman (1982), Hargreaves-Samani (1985), Turc (1961), Penman (1963), Priestley-Taylor (1972), Linacre (1977), Kimberly Penman (1982), Hargreaves-Samani (1985), Copais (2006)], for the daily reference evapotranspiration (ETo) estimation in comparison with the Penman Monteith method standardized by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO56 – PM). The analysis, used data of two meteorological stations at Krania and Kozane, located at Western Macedonia, Greece. Daily values of ETo were calculated using meteorological data for a time-period of 34 and 48 years of the two stations respectively. Since none of the solar radiation variables was measured on the stations, the net radiation variable (Rnet) was derived empirically following the procedure outlined in the FAO-56 paper (Allen et al., 1998). Such values were compared using linear regression and statistical indices of quantitative approaches to model performance evaluation. All the statistical indices used were calculated on a daily basis. However, the root mean square error (RMSE) was additionally calculated on a monthly basis in order to evaluate the seasonality differences of the methods to be compared. In regard to the regression equations, the Priestley-Taylor method had the best correlation to the FAO56-PM method at Krania station, while at Kozane station the Turc method gave the best predicted values. By comparing the monthly accumulated values of ETo it may be concluded that not only on a daily but on a monthly basis as well, all of the methods compared perform good during the winter season (October-February) with smaller deviations in absolute values of ETo and lower RMSE, but show poor performance during the summer season (March-September) with the opposite characteristics

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1540/1/documents/EW_2013_42_02.pdf (1993 KB)

  1. C. Papathanasiou, D. Serbis, and N. Mamassis, Flood mitigation at the downstream areas of a transboundary river, Water Utility Journal, 3, 33–42, 2013.

    Floods in the basin of the Ardas river, a transboundary river that has its springs in Bulgaria and its outlet in Greece, have often created havoc and caused millions of damage, especially in downstream Greek areas, which repeatedly receive unregulated flow from upstream dams. More specifically, the Ardas river, a tributary of the Evros river, flows for 241 km in Bulgaria and for only 49 km in Greece and its catchment stretches for 5.200 km2 (94% of the total area) in Bulgaria and for 350 km2 (6% of the total area) in Greece. Three large dams along the river have been constructed in Bulgaria (Kardzhaly, Studen Kladenets and Ivaylovgrad), the last one, Ivaylovgrad dam, being in short distance (approx. 15 km) from the transnational borders. During heavy rain, excessive flow from Ivaylovgrad dam is often released downstream, in order to relieve the reservoir that is kept at maximum level for energy production reasons. As a result, the downstream areas, also affected by the same heavy rain events, need to regulate large flows, often with inadequate response time and relevant means. The present study describes an approach to estimate flood water levels in the Greek territory, caused by both intense rain events and increased releases from the upstream dam. For this purpose the study area was divided into three sub-basins and the corresponding flood volumes were calculated using several methodologies. Given the fact that downstream areas are proved to be in high risk in terms of flooding, a series of structural and non-structural measures for the downstream area is examined and the paper concludes with an approach towards the confrontation and mitigation of flood effects in transboundary river basins.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1429/1/documents/WUJ_2013_05_04.pdf (635 KB)

  1. E. Kountouri, N. Petrochilos, N. Liaros, V. Oikonomou, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, N. Zarkadoulas, A. Vött, H. Hadler, P. Henning, and T. Willershäuser, The Mycenaean drainage works of north Kopais, Greece: a new project incorporating surface surveys, geophysical research and excavation, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 13 (3), 710–718, doi:10.2166/ws.2013.110, 2013.

    The attempt to drain the Kopais Lake was one of the most impressive and ambitious technical works of prehistoric times in Greece, inspiring myths and traditions referring to its construction and operation. The impressive remnants of the Mycenaean hydraulic works represent the most important land reclamation effort during prehistoric Greek antiquity, thus attracting the attention of the international scientific community. Nevertheless, in spite of the minor or extended contemporary surveys, the picture of the prehistoric drainage works in Kopais has remained ambiguous. Concerning the function of these works and their precise date within the Bronze Age, the proposed theories were based solely on indications from surface survey; data stemming from archaeological or geophysical research methods have been largely neglected. A new interdisciplinary project focusing on the interpretation of the Mycenaean drainage works of Kopais has been established and paper presents the results of thefirst study season.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/ws.2013.110

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Voudouris, K. S., Y. Christodoulakos, F. Steiakakis and A. N. Angelakis, Hydrogeological characteristics of Hellenic aqueducts-like Qanats, Water, 5, 1326-1345, 2013.

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Apostolidou, Topography-adjusted solar radiation indices and their importance in hydrology, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 57 (4), 756–775, doi:10.1080/02626667.2012.670703, 2012.

    Solar radiation, direct and diffuse, is affected by surface characteristics, such as slope, aspect, altitude and shading. The paper examines the effects of topography on radiation, at multiple spatiotemporal scales, using suitable geometrical methods for the direct and diffuse components. Two indices are introduced for comparing the direct radiation received by areas at the same and different latitudes, respectively. To investigate the profile of direct radiation through the Greek territory, these are evaluated from hourly to annual basis, via GIS techniques. Moreover, different approaches are examined for estimating the actual global radiation at operational spatial scales (sub-basin and terrain), according to the available meteorological data. The study indicates that the errors of typical hydrometeorological modelling formulas, ignoring the topographic effects and the seasonal allocation of direct and diffuse radiation, depend on the spatial scale and they are non-uniformly distributed in time. In all cases, the estimations are improved by applying the proposed adjusting approaches. In particular, the adjustment of the measured global radiation ensures up to 10% increase of efficiency, while the modified Angström formula achieves slight (i.e. 2-4%) increase of efficiency and notable reduction of bias.

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2012.670703

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Kunkel, V., T. Wells, and G. R. Hancock, Soil temperature dynamics at the catchment scale, Geoderma, 273, 32–44, doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.03.011, 2016.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, G. G. Anagnostopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Scientific dialogue on climate: is it giving black eyes or opening closed eyes? Reply to “A black eye for the Hydrological Sciences Journal” by D. Huard, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56 (7), 1334–1339, 2011.

    Remarks:

    The full text is available at the journal's web site: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2011.610759

    Huard's Discussion can be accessed again from the journal's web site: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2011.610758

    Weblog discussions can be seen in Climate Science, ABC News Watch, Fabius Maximus, Itia.

    Related works:

    • [17] A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1140/1/documents/2011HSJ_OpeningClosedEyes.pdf (88 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2011.610759

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Jiang, P., M. R. Gautam, J. Zhu and Z. Yu, How well do the GCMs/RCMs capture the multi-scale temporal variability of precipitation in the Southwestern United States?, Journal of Hydrology, 479, 75-85, 2013.
    2. Chun, K. P., H. S. Wheater, and C. Onof, Comparison of drought projections using two UK weather generators, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 58(2), 1–15, 2013.
    3. #Ranzi, R., Influence of climate and anthropogenic feedbacks on the hydrological cycle, water management and engineering, Proceedings of 2013 IAHR World Congress, 2013.
    4. Kundzewicz, Z.W., S. Kanae, S. I. Seneviratne, J. Handmer, N. Nicholls, P. Peduzzi, R. Mechler, L. M. Bouweri, N. Arnell, K. Mach, R. Muir-Wood, G. R. Brakenridge, W. Kron, G. Benito, Y. Honda, K. Takahashi, and B. Sherstyukov, Flood risk and climate change: global and regional perspectives, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 59(1), 1-28, doi:10.1080/02626667.2013.857411, 2014.
    5. #Jiménez Cisneros, B.E., T. Oki, N.W. Arnell, G. Benito, J.G. Cogley, P. Döll, T. Jiang, and S.S. Mwakalila, Freshwater resources. In: Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Field, C.B., V.R. Barros, D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mastrandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. MacCracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (eds.)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, pp. 229-269, 2014.
    6. Hesse, C., V. Krysanova, A. Stefanova, M. Bielecka, and D. A. Domnin, Assessment of climate change impacts on water quantity and quality of the multi-river Vistula Lagoon catchment, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 60(5), 890-911, doi:10.1080/02626667.2014.967247, 2015.
    7. Nayak, P. C., R. Wardlaw, and A. K. Kharya, Water balance approach to study the effect of climate change on groundwater storage for Sirhind command area in India, International Journal of River Basin Management, 13(2), 243-261, doi:10.1080/15715124.2015.1012206, 2015.
    8. Frank, P., Negligence, non-science, and consensus climatology, Energy and Environment, 26(3), doi:10.1260/0958-305X.26.3.391, 2015.
    9. Kara, F., I. Yucel, and Z. Akyurek, Climate change impacts on extreme precipitation of water supply area in Istanbul: Use of ensemble climate modelling and geo-statistical downscaling, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(14), 2481-2495, doi:10.1080/02626667.2015.1133911, 2016.
    10. Refsgaard, J. C., T. O. Sonnenborg, M. B. Butts, J. H. Christensen, S. Christensen, M. Drews, K. H. Jensen, F. Jørgensen, L. F. Jørgensen, M. A. D. Larsen, S. H. Rasmussen, L. P. Seaby, D. Seifert, and T. N. Vilhelmsen, Climate change impacts on groundwater hydrology – where are the main uncertainties and can they be reduced?, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(13), 2312-2324, doi:10.1080/02626667.2015.1131899, 2016.
    11. Kundzewicz, Z. W., V. Krysanova, R. Dankers, Y. Hirabayashi, S. Kanae, F. F. Hattermann, S. Huang, P. C. D. Milly, M. Stoffel, P. P. J. Driessen, P. Matczak, P. Quevauviller, and H.-J. Schellnhuber, Differences in flood hazard projections in Europe – their causes and consequences for decision making, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 62(1), 1-14, doi:10.1080/02626667.2016.1241398, 2017.

  1. G. G. Anagnostopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (7), 1094–1110, doi:10.1080/02626667.2010.513518, 2010.

    We compare the output of various climate models to temperature and precipitation observations at 55 points around the globe. We spatially aggregate model output and observations over the contiguous USA using data from 70 stations, and we perform comparison at several temporal scales, including a climatic (30-year) scale. Besides confirming the findings of a previous assessment study that model projections at point scale are poor, results show that the spatially integrated projections do not correspond to reality any better.

    Remarks:

    The paper has been discussed in weblogs and forums.

    Weblogs and forums that discussed this article during 2010:

    1. Very Important New Paper “A Comparison Of Local And Aggregated Climate Model Outputs With Observed Data” By Anagnostopoulos Et Al 2010 (Climate Science: Roger Pielke Sr.)
    2. New peer reviewed paper shows just how bad the climate models really are (Watts Up With That?)
    3. Missing News: No skill in climate modelling (ABC News Watch)
    4. Missing News: Climate models disputed (ABC News Watch)
    5. New peer reviewed paper shows just how bad the climate models really are (repost 1) (Countdown to critical mass)
    6. New peer reviewed paper shows just how bad the climate models really are (repost2 ) (Climate Observer)
    7. New Major Peer-Reviewed Study: Climate Models' Predictions Found To Be Shitty (C3)
    8. New peer reviewed paper shows just how bad the climate models really are - A response to the Climate Change Misinformation at wattsupwiththat.com (Wott's Up With That?)
    9. Climate model abuse (Niche Modeling)
    10. Very Important New Paper on models versus reality (Greenie Watch)
    11. New paper shows that there is no means of reliably predicting climate variables (Greenie Watch 2)
    12. A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data (Fire And Ice)
    13. Peer Reviewed Study States The Obvious (US Message Board)
    14. Climate models don’t work, in hindsight (Herald Sun Andrew Bolt Blog)
    15. Climate models don’t work, in hindsight (repost) (The Daily Telegraph)
    16. No abuse hides the fact:  warmist models cannot even predict our past (Herald Sun Andrew Bolt Blog 2)
    17. No abuse hides the fact: the warmist models cannot even predict our past (PA Pundits – International)
    18. Aussie rains – IPCC models are bunkum, Energy tsunami, CCNet updates, Exit EU petition (clothcap)
    19. Aussie rains – IPCC models are bunkum, Energy tsunami, CCNet updates, Exit EU petition (repost) (My Telegraph)
    20. Science not politics (ecomyths)
    21. More evidence that Global Climate computer models are worthless (Tucano's Perch)
    22. Model skill? (Retread Resources Blog)
    23. Estudo sobre modelos climáticos (MeteoPT.com - Fórum de Meteorologia)
    24. Strategie di verifica delle prestazioni dei GCM, i risultati degli idrologi dell’università di Atene (Climate Monitor)
    25. Strategie di verifica delle prestazioni dei GCM, i risultati degli idrologi dell’università di Atene (repost) (Blog All Over The World)
    26. Klima - spådommer og målinger (ABC News)
    27. "Scam for the Ages" Makes Madoff Look Like Small Change (Al Fin)
    28. Teoria do AGA: um passado duvidoso, um presente mal contado e um futuro pior ainda. (Sou Engenheiro)

    Related works:

    • [84] Credibility of climate predictions revisited (predecessor presentation)
    • [20] On the credibility of climate predictions (previous related publication)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/978/1/documents/928051726__.pdf (1309 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2010.513518

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Kundzewicz, Z. W., and E. Z. Stakhiv, Are climate models “ready for prime time” in water resources management applications, or is more research needed? Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55(7), 1085–1089, 2010.
    2. #Liebscher, H.-J., and H. G. Mendel, Vom empirischen Modellansatz zum komplexen hydrologischen Flussgebietsmodell – Rückblick und Perspektiven, 132 p., Koblenz, Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde, 2010.
    3. Stockwell, D. R. B., Critique of drought models in the Australian Drought Exceptional Circumstances Report (DECR), Energy and Environment, 21(5), 425-436, 2010.
    4. Di Baldassarre, G., M. Elshamy, A. van Griensven, E. Soliman, M. Kigobe, P. Ndomba, J. Mutemi, F. Mutua, S. Moges, J.-Q. Xuan, D. Solomatine, and S. Uhlenbrook, Future hydrology and climate in the River Nile basin: a review, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56(2), 199-211, 2011.
    5. Carlin, A., A multidisciplinary, science-based approach to the economics of climate change, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 8(4), 985-1031, 2011.
    6. Fildes, R., and N. Kourentzes, Validation and forecasting accuracy in models of climate change, International Journal of Forecasting, 27(4), 968-995, 2011.
    7. Kundzewicz, Z. W., Nonstationarity in water resources – Central European perspective, Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 47(3), 550-562, 2011.
    8. Sivakumar, B., Water crisis: From conflict to cooperation – an overview, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56(4), 531-552, 2011.
    9. Loehle, C., Criteria for assessing climate change impacts on ecosystems, Ecology and Evolution, 1 (1), 63–72, 2011.
    10. Ward, J. D., A. D. Werner, W. P. Nel, and S. Beecham, The influence of constrained fossil fuel emissions scenarios on climate and water resource projections, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 15, 1879-1893, 2011.
    11. #Idso, C., R. M. Carter, and S. F. Singer, Climate models and their limitations, Climate Change Reconsidered: 2011 Interim Report of the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), Chapter 1, 32 pp., 2011.
    12. #Huard, D., The challenges of climate change interpretation, Ouranos Newsletter, Montreal, Quebec, 3 pp., 21 September 2011.
    13. Stakhiv, E. Z., Pragmatic approaches for water management under climate change uncertainty, JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 47(6), 1183-1196, 2011.
    14. Huard, D., A black eye for the Hydrological Sciences Journal, Discussion of “A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data”, by G. G. Anagnostopoulos et al. (2010, Hydrol. Sci. J. 55 (7), 1094–1110), Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56(7), 1330–1333, 2011.
    15. #Martin, T. E., Mine waste management in wet, mountainous terrain: Some British Columbia perspectives, Part II – Creating, managing and judging our legacy, Proceedings Tailings and Mine Waste 2011, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 2011.
    16. #Kundzewicz, Z. W., Comparative assessment: fact or fiction? Paper presented at the Workshop Including long-term climate change in hydrologic design, World Bank, Washington, D.C., USA, November 21, 2011.
    17. Okruszko, T., H. Duel, M. Acreman, M. Grygoruk, M. Flörke, and C. Schneider, Broad-scale ecosystem services of European wetlands — overview of the current situation and future perspectives under different climate and water management scenarios, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 56(8), 1501–1517, 2011.
    18. Stanislawska, K., K Krawiec, and Z. W. Kundzewicz, Modeling global temperature changes with genetic programming, Computers and Mathematics with Applications, 64(12), 3717-3728, 2012.
    19. Petheram, C., P. Rustomji, T. R. McVicar, W. Cai, F. H. S. Chiew, J. Vleeshouwer, T. G. Van Niel, L.-T. Li, R. G. Cresswell, R. J. Donohue, J. Teng, and J.-M. Perraud, Estimating the impact of projected climate change on runoff across the tropical savannas and semi-arid rangelands of northern Australia, Journal of Hydrometeorology, 13 (2), 483-503, 2012.
    20. #Fekete, B. M., and E. Stakhiv, Water management preparation strategies for adaptation to changing climate, Climatic Change and Global Warming of Inland Waters: Impacts and Mitigation for Ecosystems and Societies, C. R. Goldman, M. Kumagai, and R. D. Robarts (eds.), 413-427, 2012.
    21. #Asian Development Bank, Guidelines for climate proofing investment in agriculture, rural development and food security, 101 pp., Mandaluyong City, Philippines, ISBN 978-92-9092-900-0, 2012.
    22. Hromadka, T. V., M. Jaye, M. Phillips, T. Hromadka, and D. Phillips, A mathematical model of cryospheric response to climate changes, Journal of Cold Regions Engineering, 27 (2), 67-93, 2013.
    23. Serrat-Capdevila, A., J. B. Valdes, F. Dominguez, and S. Rajagopal, Characterizing the water extremes of the new century in the US South-west: a comprehensive assessment from state-of-the-art climate model projections, International Journal of Water Resources Development, 29 (2), 152-171, 2013.
    24. Nastos, P. T., N. Politi, and J. Kapsomenakis, Spatial and temporal variability of the aridity index in Greece, Atmospheric Research, 19, 140-152, 2013.
    25. Jiang, P., M. R. Gautam, J. Zhu, and Z. Yu, How well do the GCMs/RCMs capture the multi-scale temporal variability of precipitation in the Southwestern United States?, Journal of Hydrology, 479, 13-23, 2013.
    26. Nazemi, A., H. S. Wheater, K. P. Chun, and A. Elshorbagy, A stochastic reconstruction framework for analysis of water resource system vulnerability to climate-induced changes in river flow regime, Water Resources Research, 49(1), 291-305, doi:10.1029/2012WR012755, 2013.
    27. Chun, K. P., H. S. Wheater, and C. Onof, Comparison of drought projections using two UK weather generators, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 58(2), 1–15, 2013.
    28. Pielke, Sr. R.A., Comment on “The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results”, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 94(7), 1075-1077, 2013.
    29. Piniewski, M., F. Voss, I. Bärlund, T. Okruszko and Z. W. Kundzewicz, Effect of modelling scale on the assessment of climate change impact on river runoff, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 58 (4), 737-754, 2013.
    30. #Pielke R. A. Sr., J. Adegoke, F. Hossain, G. Kallos, D. Niyogi, T. Seastedt, K. Suding, C. Y. Wright, and D. Staley, Preface, Climate Vulnerability: Understanding and Addressing Threats to Essential Resources, Pielke, R. (editor), xxi-xxix, Elsevier Science, 2013.
    31. #Lang, M. A., Renewable energy and water resources, Climate Vulnerability: Understanding and Addressing Threats to Essential Resources, Pielke, R. (editor), Vol. 3, 149-166, Elsevier Science, 2013.
    32. #He, Y., F. Pappenberger, D. Manful, H. Cloke, P. Bates, F. Wetterhall, and B. Parkes, Flood inundation dynamics and socioeconomic vulnerability under environmental change, Climate Vulnerability: Understanding and Addressing Threats to Essential Resources, Pielke, R. (editor), Vol. 5, 241-255, Elsevier Science, 2013.
    33. Kumar, S., P. A. Dirmeyer, V. Merwade, T. DelSole, J. M. Adams, and D. Niyogi, Land use/cover change impacts in CMIP5 climate simulations – A new methodology and 21st century challenges, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118(12), 6337-6353, 2013.
    34. #Loukas, A., and L. Vasiliades, Review of applied methods for flood-frequency analysis in a changing environment in Greece, In: A review of applied methods in Europe for flood-frequency analysis in a changing environment, Floodfreq COST action ES0901: European procedures for flood frequency estimation (ed. by H. Madsen et al.), Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, UK, 2013.
    35. Ruffault, J., N. K .Martin-StPaul, C. Duffet, F. Goge and F. Mouillot, Projecting future drought in Mediterranean forests: bias correction of climate models matters!, Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 117 (1-2), 113-122, 2014.
    36. Nazemi, A., and H. S. Wheater, How can the uncertainty in the natural inflow regime propagate into the assessment of water resource systems? Advances in Water Resources, 63, 131-142, 2014.
    37. Kundzewicz, Z. W., S. Kanae, S. I. Seneviratne, J. Handmer, N. Nicholls, P. Peduzzi, R. Mechler, L. M. Bouweri, N. Arnell, K. Mach, R. Muir-Wood, G. R. Brakenridge, W. Kron, G. Benito, Y. Honda, K. Takahashi, and B. Sherstyukov, Flood risk and climate change: global and regional perspectives, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 59(1), 1–28, 2014.
    38. Grygoruk, M., U. Biereżnoj-Bazille, M. Mazgajski and J.Sienkiewicz, Climate-induced challenges for wetlands: revealing the background for the adaptive ecosystem management in the Biebrza Valley, Poland, Advances in Global Change Research, 58, 209-232, 2014.
    39. Gilioli, G., S. Pasquali, S. Parisi and S. Winter, Modelling the potential distribution of Bemisia tabaci in Europe considering climate change scenario, Pest Management Science, 70(1), 1611–1623, 10.1002/ps.3734, 2014.
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    41. Hughes, D. A., S. Mantel and T. Mohobane, An assessment of the skill of downscaled GCM outputs in simulating historical patterns of rainfall variability in South Africa, Hydrology Research, 45 (1), 134-147, 2014.
    42. #Jiménez Cisneros, B.E., T. Oki, N.W. Arnell, G. Benito, J.G. Cogley, P. Döll, T. Jiang, and S.S. Mwakalila, Freshwater resources. In: Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Field, C.B., V.R. Barros, D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mastrandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. MacCracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (eds.)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, pp. 229-269, 2014.
    43. Hromadka, T. V., H. D. McInvale, B. Gatzke, M. Phillips, and B. Espinosa, Cumulative departure model of the cryosphere during the Pleistocene, Journal of Cold Regions Engineering, 06014002, 2014.
    44. Nova, J., Government monopoly in science and the role of independent scientists, Energy and Environment, 25(6-7), 1219–1224, 2014.
    45. #McKitrick, R., Climate Policy Implications of the Hiatus in Global Warming, Fraser Institute, 2014.
    46. Galbraith, H., D. W. DesRochers, S. Brown and J. M. Reed, Predicting vulnerabilities of North American shorebirds to climate change, PLoS ONE, 9(9), 10.1371/journal.pone.0108899, 2014.
    47. Yao, Y., S. Zhao, Y. Zhang, K. Jia and M. Liu, Spatial and decadal variations in potential evapotranspiration of China based on reanalysis datasets during 1982–2010, Atmosphere, 5(4), 737-754, 2014.
    48. Kundzewicz, Z., and D. Gerten, Grand challenges related to assessment of climate change impacts on freshwater resources, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 20 (1), 10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001012, A4014011, 2015.
    49. Hromadka II, T.V., H.D. McInvale, M. Phillips and B. Espinosa, Assessment of ice volume changes in the cryosphere via simplified heat transport model, American Journal of Climate Change, 3, 421-428, 2014.
    50. Hesse, C., V. Krysanova, A. Stefanova, M. Bielecka and D. A. Domnin, Assessment of climate change impacts on water quantity and quality of the multi-river Vistula Lagoon catchment, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 60(5), 890-911, doi:10.1080/02626667.2014.967247, 2015.
    51. Stefanova, A., V. Krysanova, C. Hesse, and A. I. Lillebø, Climate change impact assessment on water inflow to a coastal lagoon: the Ria de Aveiro watershed, Portugal, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 60(5), 929-948, 2015.
    52. Hesse, C., A. Stefanova, and V. Krysanova, Comparison of water flows in four European lagoon catchments under a set of future climate scenarios, Water, 7(2), 716-746, doi:10.3390/w7020716, 2015.
    53. Gelfan, A., V. A. Semenov, E. Gusev, Y. Motovilov, O. Nasonova, I. Krylenko, and E. Kovalev, Large-basin hydrological response to climate model outputs: uncertainty caused by the internal atmospheric variability, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 19, 2737-2754, doi:10.5194/hess-19-2737-2015, 2015.
    54. Nayak, P. C., R. Wardlaw, and A. K. Kharya, Water balance approach to study the effect of climate change on groundwater storage for Sirhind command area in India, International Journal of River Basin Management, 13(2), 243-261, doi:10.1080/15715124.2015.1012206, 2015.
    55. Yu, Z., P. Jiang, M. R. Gautam, Y. Zhang, and K. Acharya, Changes of seasonal storm properties in California and Nevada from an ensemble of climate projections, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 120(7), 2676-2688, doi:10.1002/2014JD022414, 2015.
    56. Legates, D. R., W. Soon, W. M. Briggs and C. Monckton of Brenchley, Climate consensus and ‘misinformation’: a rejoinder to agnotology, scientific consensus, and the teaching and learning of climate change, Science and Education, 24, 299-318, doi:10.1007/s11191-013-9647-9, 2015.
    57. Frank, P., Negligence, non-science, and consensus climatology, Energy and Environment, 26(3), doi:10.1260/0958-305X.26.3.391, 2015.
    58. Kundzewicz, Z.W., Climate change track in river floods in Europe, Proc. IAHS, 369, 189–194, 10.5194/piahs-369-189-2015, 2015.
    59. Kara, F., I. Yucel, and Z. Akyurek, Climate change impacts on extreme precipitation of water supply area in Istanbul: Use of ensemble climate modelling and geo-statistical downscaling, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(14), 2481-2495, doi:10.1080/02626667.2015.1133911, 2016.
    60. Refsgaard, J. C., T. O. Sonnenborg, M. B. Butts, J. H. Christensen, S. Christensen, M. Drews, K. H. Jensen, F. Jørgensen, L. F. Jørgensen, M. A. D. Larsen, S. H. Rasmussen, L. P. Seaby, D. Seifert, and T. N. Vilhelmsen, Climate change impacts on groundwater hydrology – where are the main uncertainties and can they be reduced?, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(13), 2312-2324, doi:10.1080/02626667.2015.1131899, 2016.
    61. #Kundzewicz, Z. W., Climate change impacts and adaptation in water and land context, Environmental Resource Management and the Nexus Approach – Managing Water, Soil, and Waste in the Context of Global Change, H. Hettiarachchi, and R. Ardakanian (editors), 11-39, Springer, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28593-1_2, 2016.
    62. #Serrat-Capdevila, A., D. A. García Ramírez, and N. Tayebi, Key global water challenges and the role of remote sensing, Earth Observation for Water Resources Management: Current Use and Future Opportunities for the Water Sector, 9-31, doi:10.1596/978-1-4648-0475-5_ch1, 2016.
    63. Jiang, P., Z. Yu, M. R. Gautam, F. Yuan, and K. Acharya, Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections, Global and Planetary Change, 142, 41–52, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001, 2016.
    64. Gupta, H. V., G. Sapriza-Azuri, J. Jódar, and J. Carrera, Circulation pattern-based assessment of projected climate change for a catchment in Spain, Journal of Hydrology, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.06.032, 2016.
    65. #Fekete, B. M., G. Pisacane, and D. Wisser, Crystal balls into the future: are global circulation and water balance models ready?, Proc. IAHS, 374, 41-51, doi:10.5194/piahs-374-41-2016, 2016.
    66. Kundzewicz, Z. W., V. Krysanova, R. Dankers, Y. Hirabayashi, S. Kanae, F. F. Hattermann, S. Huang, P. C. D. Milly, M. Stoffel, P. P. J. Driessen, P. Matczak, P. Quevauviller, and H.-J. Schellnhuber, Differences in flood hazard projections in Europe – their causes and consequences for decision making, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 62(1), 1-14, doi:10.1080/02626667.2016.1241398, 2017.
    67. Grygoruk, M., and S. Rannowb, Mind the gap! Lessons from science-based stakeholder dialogue in climate-adapted management of wetlands, Journal of Environmental Management, 186, 108-119, doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.10.066, 2017.
    68. Hossain, F., E. Beighley, S. Burian, J. Chen, A. Mitra, D. Niyogi, R. Pielke Sr, and D. Wegner, Review of approaches and recommendations for improving resilience of water management infrastructure: the case for large dams, Journal of Infrastructure Systems, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IS.1943-555X.0000370, 2017.
    69. Gusev, Y. M., V. A. Semenov, O. N. Nasonova, and E E. Kovalev, Weather noise impact on the uncertainty of simulated water balance components of river basins, Hydrological Sciences Journal, doi:10.1080/02626667.2017.1319064, 2017.
    70. Loehle, C., The epistemological status of general circulation models, Climate Dynamics, doi:10.1007/s00382-017-3717-7, 2017.
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  1. G. Papathopoulou, E. Georgiou, N. Mamassis, and M. Mimikou, Estimation of areal distribution of climatic and bioclimatic indices in Attica region using the METEONET Network data, Technica Chronica, I, Athens, January 2009.

    This paper has as main objective the climatic and bioclimatic investigation of the wider area of Athens that is defined by the fully automated telemetric network of stations (METEONET), which has been installed by the National Technical University of Athens. The climatic and bioclimatic investigation of study area was accomplished by the use of climatic and bioclimatic indices. Through a wide spectrum of indices that exist, the appropriate indices were selected in order to describe as well as possible the climatic conditions of Athens. Firstly the indices were calculated for every hydrometeorological station and afterwards a surface completion of data was realized with the use of Arc Map software by applying the interpolation method IDW. The results were many thematic maps for every climatic index in monthly basis. The spatial depiction points out the climatic classification of study area and concludes to valuable information for climatic conditions.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/927/1/documents/pap_meteo_tel1.pdf (678 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Makropoulos, A. Langousis, S. Baki, A. Efstratiadis, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, and N. Mamassis, Climate, hydrology, energy, water: recognizing uncertainty and seeking sustainability, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 13, 247–257, doi:10.5194/hess-13-247-2009, 2009.

    Since 1990 extensive funds have been spent on research in climate change. Although Earth Sciences, including climatology and hydrology, have benefited significantly, progress has proved incommensurate with the effort and funds, perhaps because these disciplines were perceived as “tools” subservient to the needs of the climate change enterprise rather than autonomous sciences. At the same time, research was misleadingly focused more on the “symptom”, i.e. the emission of greenhouse gases, than on the “illness”, i.e. the unsustainability of fossil fuel-based energy production. Unless energy saving and use of renewable resources become the norm, there is a real risk of severe socioeconomic crisis in the not-too-distant future. A framework for drastic paradigm change is needed, in which water plays a central role, due to its unique link to all forms of renewable energy, from production (hydro and wave power) to storage (for time-varying wind and solar sources), to biofuel production (irrigation). The extended role of water should be considered in parallel to its other uses, domestic, agricultural and industrial. Hydrology, the science of water on Earth, must move towards this new paradigm by radically rethinking its fundamentals, which are unjustifiably trapped in the 19th-century myths of deterministic theories and the zeal to eliminate uncertainty. Guidance is offered by modern statistical and quantum physics, which reveal the intrinsic character of uncertainty/entropy in nature, thus advancing towards a new understanding and modelling of physical processes, which is central to the effective use of renewable energy and water resources.

    Remarks:

    Blogs and forums that have discussed this article: Climate science; Vertical news; Outside the cube.

    Update 2011-09-26: The removed video of the panel discussion of Nobelists entitled “Climate Changes and Energy Challenges” (held in the framework of the 2008 Meeting of Nobel Laureates at Lindau on Physics) which is referenced in footnote 1 of the paper, still cannot be located online. However, Larry Gould has an audio file of the discussion here.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/878/17/documents/hess-13-247-2009.pdf (1476 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/hess-13-247-2009

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Andréassian, V., C. Perrin, L. Berthet, N. Le Moine, J. Lerat, C. Loumagne, L. Oudin, T. Mathevet, M.-H. Ramos, and A. Valéry, HESS Opinions "Crash tests for a standardized evaluation of hydrological models", Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 13, 1757-1764, 2009.
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    4. Jódar, J., J. Carrera, and A. Cruz, Irrigation enhances precipitation at the mountains downwind, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 14, 2003-2010, 2010.
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    6. Ward, J. D., A. D. Werner, W. P. Nel, and S. Beecham, The influence of constrained fossil fuel emissions scenarios on climate and water resource projections, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 15, 1879-1893, 2011.
    7. #Montanari, A, Uncertainty of hydrological predictions, In: P. Wilderer (ed.) Treatise on Water Science, Vol. 2, 459–478, Oxford Academic Press, 2011.
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    9. Andrés-Doménech, I., A. Montanari and J. B. Marco, Efficiency of storm detention tanks for urban drainage systems under climate variability, Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, 138 (1), 36-46, 2012.
    10. Montanari, A., Hydrology of the Po River: looking for changing patterns in river discharge, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16, 3739-3747, doi:10.5194/hess-16-3739-2012, 2012.
    11. Voulvoulis, N., Water and sanitation provision in a low carbon society: The need for a systems approach, Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, 4(4), 041403, 2012.
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    15. Hrachowitz, M., H.H.G. Savenije, G. Blöschl, J.J. McDonnell, M. Sivapalan, J.W. Pomeroy, B. Arheimer, T. Blume, M.P. Clark, U. Ehret, F. Fenicia, J.E. Freer, A. Gelfan, H.V. Gupta, D.A. Hughes, R.W. Hut, A. Montanari, S. Pande, D. Tetzlaff, P.A. Troch, S. Uhlenbrook, T. Wagener, H.C. Winsemius, R.A. Woods, E. Zehe, and C. Cudennec, A decade of Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB) — a review, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 58(6), 1198-1255, 2013.
    16. Thompson, S. E., M. Sivapalan, C. J. Harman, V. Srinivasan, M. R. Hipsey, P. Reed, A. Montanari and G. and Blöschl, Developing predictive insight into changing water systems: use-inspired hydrologic science for the Anthropocene, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, 5013-5039, 2013.
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    18. Dette, H., and K. Sen, Goodness-of-fit tests in long-range dependent processes under fixed alternatives, ESAIM: Probability and Statistics, 17, 432-443, 2013.
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    20. Jain, S., Reference climate and water data networks for India, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 20(4), 02515001, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001170, 2015.
    21. Voulvoulis, N., The potential of water reuse as a management option for water security under the ecosystem services approach, Desalination and Water Treatment, 53 (12), 3263-3271, 2015.
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    23. #Kim, S.S.H., J.D. Hughes, D. Dutta, and J. Vaze, Why do sub-period consistency calibrations outperform traditional optimisations in streamflow prediction? Proceedings of 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, 2061-2067, Gold Coast, Australia, 2015.
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  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and A. Christofides, On the credibility of climate predictions, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 53 (4), 671–684, 2008.

    Geographically distributed predictions of future climate, obtained through climate models, are widely used in hydrology and many other disciplines, typically without assessing their reliability. Here we compare the output of various models to temperature and precipitation observations from eight stations with long (over 100 years) records from around the globe. The results show that models perform poorly, even at a climatic (30-year) scale. Thus local model projections cannot be credible, whereas a common argument that models can perform better at larger spatial scales is unsupported.

    Remarks:

    The paper has been widely discussed in weblogs and forums.

    Weblogs and forums that discussed this article during 2008:

    1. Koutsoyiannis et al 2008: On the credibility of climate predictions (Climate Audit by Steve McIntyre) Reaction by first author * * * Additional reactions: 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 * 6 * more
    2. On the credibility of climate predictions by Koutsoyiannis et al. 2008 (Climate Science by Roger Pielke Sr. 1)
    3. Comments on a New Report on Climate Change in Colorado… (Climate Science by Roger Pielke Sr. 2)
    4. New Paper On Dynamic Downscaling Of Climate Models By Rockel Et. Al. Published (Climate Science by Roger Pielke Sr. 3)
    5. Hypothesis testing and long range memory (Real Climate by Gavin A. Schmidt) Reaction by 1st author; * * * Additional reaction
    6. Koutsoyiannis vs RealClimate.ORG (The Reference Frame by Luboš Motl) Reaction by 1rst author
    7. Modellen en vroegere werkelijkheid: een test (Klimaat by Marcel Severijnen 1)
    8. Nog eens: Modellen en vroegere werkelijkheid (Klimaat by Marcel Severijnen 2)
    9. Far from model predictions. As for the CSIRO’s… (Andrew Bolt Blog 1)
    10. Dud studies behind Rudd’s freakish claims (Andrew Bolt Blog 2)
    11. Rudd’s dud study (Andrew Bolt Blog 3)
    12. November snows all over the CSIRO (Andrew Bolt Blog 4)
    13. New paper demonstrates lack of credibility for climate model predictions (Jennifer Marohasy Blog 1)
    14. Ten of the Best Climate Research Papers (Nine Peer-Reviewed): A Note from Cohenite (Jennifer Marohasy Blog 2)
    15. Ten Worst Man-Made Disasters (Jennifer Marohasy Blog 3)
    16. Climate models struggling for credibility (Al Fin)
    17. Climate models fuzz (European Tribune)
    18. If it wasn't so serious then it'd be funny (Kerplunk - Common sense from Down Under)
    19. Laying the boot into climate models (The Tizona Group)
    20. More model mania (Planet Gore)
    21. New research on the credibility of climate predictions (SciForums)
    22. New paper demonstrates lack of credibility for climate model predictions 2 (Blogotariat)
    23. New study: climate models fail again (MSNBC Boards 1)
    24. Global Climate Models Fail (Again) (MSNBC Boards 2)
    25. On the credibility of climate predictions (Chronos)
    26. Sane skepticism, part 2 (Helicity)
    27. Science. On the credibility of climate predictions (Greenhouse Bullcrap)
    28. Testing global warming models (Assorted Meanderings)
    29. Climate cuttings 21 (Bishop Hill blog)
    30. Models, Climate Change and Credibility... (21st Century Schizoid Man)
    31. Two valuable perspectives on global warming (Fabius Maximus)
    32. Unreliability of climate models? (Climate Change)
    33. Crumbling Consensus: Global Climate Models Fail (Stubborn Facts)
    34. The Australian government's climate castle is built on sand (Greenie Watch)
    35. Koutsoyiannis et al 2008 (Detached Ideas)
    36. Credibility of Climate Predictions Paper (TWO community)
    37. "Climate consensus" continues to unravel (Solomonia)
    38. Climate models have no predictive value (Acadie 1755)
    39. Global Warming Summary series, Part 5: The Earth’s Greenhouse Gas – CO2 and IPCC Climate Modeling (Global Warming Science)
    40. Reducing Vulnerability to Climate-Sensitive Risks is the Best Insurance Policy (Cato Unbound)
    41. Global Warming News of the Week (No Oil for Pacifists)
    42. A few more cooling blasts at hot air balloons (Clothcap2 : My Telegraph)
    43. IPCC-Klimamodell unbrauchbar (jetzt Sueddeutsche)
    44. Uups II: IPCC-Klimamodelle fantasieren (Die Achse des Guten)
    45. Griechische Unsicherheiten (Climate Review)
    46. El fracaso de los modelos (Valdeperrillos)
    47. Klimamodeller er usikre (Debattcentralen - Aftenposten.no)
    48. Studie: Klimatmodellernas trovärdighet låg (Klimatsvammel)
    49. Credibilidad de las predicciones climáticas (FAEC Mitos y Fraudes)

    Other reactions in weblogs, forums and Internet resources during 2008:

    Climate Audit 2 * Climate Audit 3 * Real Climate 2 * Junk Science * Wikipedia * Wikipedia Talk 1 * Wikipedia Talk 2 * Wikipedia Talk 3 * Global Warming Clearinghouse 1 * Global Warming Clearinghouse 2 * Global Warming Clearinghouse 3 * ICECAP * Climate Feedback (Nature) * Google Groups - alt.global-warming 1 * Google Groups - alt.global-warming 2 * Google Groups - alt.politics.usa * Google Groups - sci.environment * Google Groups - sci.physics * Yahoo Tech Groups * Yahoo Message Boards * Andrew Bolt Blog 5 * Andrew Bolt Blog 6 * Andrew Bolt Blog 7 * Andrew Bolt Blog 8 * Andrew Bolt Blog 9 * Andrew Bolt Blog 10 * Andrew Bolt Blog 11 * Andrew Bolt Blog 12 * Andrew Bolt Blog 13 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 4 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 5 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 6 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 7 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 8 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 9 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 10 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 11 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 12 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 13 * Jennifer Marohasy Blog 14 * The Blackboard 1 * The Blackboard 2 * The Motley Fool Discussion Boards 1 * The Motley Fool Discussion Boards 2 * The Daily Bayonet * FinanMart * JREF Forum 1 * JREF Forum 2 * JREF Forum 3 * AccuWeather * Climate Change Fraud 1 * Climate Change Fraud 2 * Climate Change Fraud 4 * Climate Change Fraud 5 * Watts Up With That? 1 * Watts Up With That? 2 * Watts Up With That? 3 * Watts Up With That? 4 * Watts Up With That? 5 * City-Data Forum * Climate Brains * Dvorak Uncensored * Newspoll * The Australian 1 * The Australian 2 * ABC Unleashed 1 * ABC Unleashed 2 * ABC Unleashed 3 * ABC Unleashed 4 * ABC Science Online Forum * Global Warming Skeptics * Niche Modeling * Dot Earth - The New York Times 1 * Dot Earth - The New York Times 2 * Dot Earth - The New York Times 3 * Dot Earth - The New York Times 4 * Dot Earth - The New York Times 5 * Dot Earth - The New York Times 6 * Bart Verheggen * WE Blog * Globe and Mail 1 * Globe and Mail 2 * Small Dead Animals * forums.ski.com.au * ABC Message Board * Sydney Morning Herald 1 (also published in the print version of the newspaper) * Sydney Morning Herald 2 * Sydney Morning Herald 3 * PistonHeads * Clipmarks * British Blogs * The Devil's Kitchen * Peak Oil Journal * The Volokh Conspiracy * Weather Underground * Capitol Grilling * Science & Environmental Policy Project * SookNET Technology * Climate Review 2 * Social Science News Central * Urban75 Forums * Wolf Howling * Launch Magazine Online * Popular Technology * The Environment Site Forums * CNC zone * Solar Cycle 24 Forums * Wired Science * Climate 411 * Daimnation * The Forum * Global Warming Information * Christian Forums 1 * Christian Forums 2 * CommonDreams.org 1 * CommonDreams.org 2 * Greenhouse Bullcrap 2 * Derkeiler Newsgroup * YouTube * Fresh Video * Topix * WeerOnline * The Air Vent * Greenfyre’s * Crikey * ChangeBringer * Scotsman.com News * Climate Change Controversies - David Pratt * Skeptical Science * Block’s Indicator of Sustainable Growth * Digg * Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub * News Busters * AgoraVox * Notre Planete * France 5 * Wissen - Sueddeutsche * Telepolis-Blogforen 1 * Telepolis-Blogforen 2 * Telepolis-Blogforen 3 * WirtschaftsWoche * Antizyklisches Forum * Oekologismus.de * Público.es * Uppsalainitiativet * Tiede.fi 1 * Tiede.fi 2 * Tiede.fi 3 * kolumbus.fi/ * De Rerum Natura * Ilmastonmuutos - totta vai tarua * Politics.be * Keisarin uudet vaatteet * Keskustelut * Que Treta * Svensson * Punditokraterne * StumbleUpon * Scribd

    Related works:

    • [85] Assessment of the reliability of climate predictions based on comparisons with historical time series (predecessor presentation)
    • [17] A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data (follow up study)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/864/1/documents/2008HSJClimPredictions.pdf (997 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1623/hysj.53.4.671

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar, ResearchGate or ResearchGate (additional)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Carter, R. M., Knock, knock: Where is the evidence for dangerous human-caused global warming?, Economic Analysis & Policy, 38(2), 177-202, 2008.
    2. #Crockford, S., Some things we know — and don’t know —about polar bears, Report, Science and Public Policy Institute, 2008.
    3. #Green, K. C., J. S. Armstrong and W. Soon, Benchmark forecasts for climate change, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, 2008.
    4. #Drinkwater, K., M. Skogen, S. Hjøllo, C. Schrum, I. Alekseeva, M. Huret and F. Léger, The effects of future climate change on the physical oceanography and comparisons of the mean and variability of the future physical properties with present day conditions, Report, RECLAIM EU/FP6 project (REsolving CLimAtic IMpacts on fish stocks), WP4 Future oceanographic changes, 28 pp., 2008.
    5. Halley, J. M., Using models with long-term persistence to interpret the rapid increase of earth’s temperature, Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 388(12), 2492-2502, 2009.
    6. Kundzewicz, Z. W., L. J. Mata, N. W. Arnell, P. Döll, B. Jimenez, K. Miller, T. Oki and Z. Şen, Water and climate projections—Reply to discussion “Climate, hydrology and freshwater: towards an interactive incorporation of hydrological experience into climate research”, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 54(2), 406-415, 2009.
    7. Hollowed, A. B., N. A. Bond, T. K. Wilderbuer, W. T. Stockhausen, Z. T. Amar, R. J. Beamish, J. E. Overland, and M. J. Schirripa, A framework for modelling fish and shellfish responses to future climate change, ICES Journal Of Marine Science, 66(7), 1584-1594, 2009.
    8. MacDonald, A. M., R. C. Calow, D. M. J. MacDonald, W. G. Darling, and B. É. Ó. Dochartaigh, What impact will climate change have on rural groundwater supplies in Africa?, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 54(4), 690-703, 2009.
    9. #Pilkey, O. H., and R. Young, The Rising Sea, 203 p., Island Press, Washington, DC, 2009.
    10. Chiew, F.H.S., J. Tenga, J. Vazea, and D.G.C. Kirono, Influence of global climate model selection on runoff impact assessment, Journal of Hydrology, 379(1-2), 172-180, 2009.
    11. McIntyre, D.R., James Hansen's 1988 predictions compared to observations, Energy and Environment, 20(4), 587-594, 2009.
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  1. A. Tsouni, C. Contoes, D. Koutsoyiannis, P. Elias, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of actual evapotranspiration by remote sensing: Application in Thessaly Plain, Greece, Sensors, 8 (6), 3586–3600, 2008.

    Remote sensing can assist in improving the estimation of the geographical distribution of evapotranspiration, and consequently water demand in large cultivated areas for irrigation purposes and sustainable water resources management. In the direction of these objectives, the daily actual evapotranspiration was calculated in this study during the summer season of 2001 over the Thessaly plain in Greece, a wide irrigated area of great agricultural importance. Three different methods were adapted and applied: the remote-sensing methods by Granger (2000) and Carlson and Buffum (1989) that use satellite data in conjunction with ground meteorological measurements and an adapted FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) Penman-Monteith method (Allen at al. 1998), which was selected to be the reference method. The satellite data were used in conjunction with ground data collected on the three closest meteorological stations. All three methods, exploit visible channels 1 and 2 and infrared channels 4 and 5 of NOAA-AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) sensor images to calculate albedo and NDVI (Normalised Difference Vegetation Index), as well as surface temperatures. The FAO Penman-Monteith and the Granger method have used exclusively NOAA-15 satellite images to obtain mean surface temperatures. For the Carlson-Buffum method a combination of NOAA-14 and ΝΟΑΑ-15 satellite images was used, since the average rate of surface temperature rise during the morning was required. The resulting estimations show that both the Carlson-Buffum and Granger methods follow in general the variations of the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method. Both methods have potential for estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration, whereby the degree of the relative agreement with the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method depends on the crop growth stage. In particular, the Carlson-Buffum method performed better during the first half of the crop development stage, while the Granger method performed better during the remaining of the development stage and the entire maturing stage. The parameter that influences the estimations significantly is the wind speed whose high values result in high underestimates of evapotranspiration. Thus, it should be studied further in future.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/861/1/documents/2008SensorsEvaporation.pdf (188 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s8063586

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Coronel, C., E. Rosales, F. Mora, A.A. López-Caloca, F.-O. Tapia-Silva, and G. Hernández, Monitoring evapotranspiration at landscape scale in Mexico: Applying the energy balance model using remotely-sensed data, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 7104, art. no. 71040H, 2008.
    2. #Agapiou, A., G. Papadavid and D.G.Hadjimitsis, Integration of wireless sensor network and remote sensing for monitoring and determining irrigation demand in Cyprus, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 7472, art. no. 74720F, 2009.
    3. #Spiliotopoulos, Μ., A. Loukas and L. Vasiliades, Actual evapotranspiration estimation from satellite-based surface energy balance model in Thessaly, Greece, Proceedings of the EYE-EEDYP Conference “Integrated Water Resource Management in Climate Change Conditions” (eds. A. Liakopoulos, V. Kanakoudis, E. Anastasiadou-Partheniou and V. Tsihrintzis), Volos, Greece, 789-796, 2009.
    4. Gao, G., C.-Y. Xu, D. Chen and V. P. Singh, Spatial and temporal characteristics of actual evapotranspiration over Haihe River basin in China, Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment, 26 (5), 655-669, 2012.
    5. #Lund, J. R., Water accounting issues in California, Water Accounting: International Approaches to Policy and Decision-Making, Edward Elgar Pub., Cheltenham, UK, 244-269, 2012.
    6. Ali, R. R., and M. Abd El-hady, Use of remote sensing and soils database for sustainable management of irrigation water in desert landforms, International Journal of Environmental Sciences, 1 (2), 77-84, 2012.
    7. Ali, R. R., and A. Shalaby, Sustainable agriculture in the arid desert west of the Nile Delta: A Crop suitability and water requirements perspective, International Journal of Soil Science, 7, 116-131 2012.
    8. Nouri, H., S. Beecham, F. Kazemi and A. M. Hassanli, A review of ET measurement techniques for estimating the water requirements of urban landscape vegetation, Urban Water Journal, 10 (4), 247-259, 2013.
    9. #Petropoulos, G. P., Remote sensing of surface turbulent energy fluxes, Remote Sensing of Energy Fluxes and Soil Moisture Content 49-84, 2013.
    10. Paparrizos, S., F. Maris and A. Matzarakis, Estimation and comparison of potential evapotranspiration based on daily and monthly data from Sperchios Valley in Central Greece, Global NEST Journal, 16 (2), 204-217, 2014.
    11. Finca, A., A.R. Palmer and V. Kakembo, Exploring ground-based methods for the validation of remotely sensed evapotranspiration, African Journal of Range and Forage Science, 32 (1), 41-50, 2015.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Logical and illogical exegeses of hydrometeorological phenomena in ancient Greece, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 7 (1), 13–22, 2007.

    Technological applications aiming at the exploitation of the natural sources appear in all ancient civilizations. The unique phenomenon in the ancient Greek civilization is that technological needs triggered physical explanations of natural phenomena, thus enabling the foundation of philosophy and science. Among these, the study of hydrometeorological phenomena had a major role. This study begins with the Ionian philosophers in the seventh century BC, continues in classical Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BC, and advances and expands through the entire Greek world up to the end of Hellenistic period. Many of the theories developed by ancient Greeks are erroneous according to modern views. However, many elements in Greek exegeses of hydrometeorological processes, such as evaporation and condensation of vapour, creation of clouds, hail, snow and rainfall, and evolution of hydrological cycle, are impressive even today.

    Related works:

    • [109] Translation into Greek

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/ws.2007.002

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Mays, L.W., A very brief history of hydraulic technology during antiquity, Environmental Fluid Mechanics, 8 (5-6), 471-484, 2008.
    2. Angelakis, A. N., and D. S. Spyridakis, A brief history of water supply and wastewater management in ancient Greece, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 10 (4), 618-628, 2010.
    3. #Angelakis, A. N., E. G. Dialynas and V. Despotakis, Evolution of water supply technologies through the centuries in Crete, Greece, Ch. 9 in Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia (A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis and N. Mamassis, eds.), 227-258, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

  1. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water basin balance model using a geographical information system, Technica Chronica, 24 (1-3), 43–52, 2004.

    Based on a Geographical Information System (GIS), a hydrological model was developed that calculates the water balance in a hydrological basin. The system uses hydrometeorological data as input and produces spatial data of runoff, evaportranspiration and water storage to various ground levels, for output. The model development is based on the object oriented programming language that is incorporated in the GIS environment. The model was applied to Acheloos River basin, upstream of the Kremasta Dam. The basin was divided into cells of 4 square kilometers each and the inputs and outputs of the model were grids with the same cell size. Measured river discharges were used for the calibration and verification of the model.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/608/1/documents/2004TechChronBalance.pdf (568 KB)

    See also: http://opac.tee.gr/cgi-bin-EL/egwcgi/317204/showfull.egw/1+0+4+full

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, A decision support system for the management of the water resource system of Athens, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 28 (14-15), 599–609, doi:10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2, 2003.

    The main components of a decision support system (DSS) developed to support the management of the water resource system of Athens are presented. The DSS includes information systems that perform data acquisition, management and visualisation, and models that perform simulation and optimisation of the hydrosystem. The models, which are the focus of the present work, are organised into two main modules. The first one is a stochastic hydrological simulator, which, based on the analysis of historical hydrological data, generates simulations and forecasts of the hydrosystem inputs. The second one allows the detailed study of the hydrosystem under alternative management policies implementing the parameterisation-simulation-optimisation methodology. The mathematical framework of this new methodology performs the allocation of the water resources to the different system components, keeping the number of control variables small and thus reducing the computational effort, even for a complex hydrosystem like the one under study. Multiple, competitive targets and constraints with different priorities can be set, which are concerned among others, with the system reliability and risk, the overall average operational cost and the overall guaranteed yield of the system. The DSS is in the final stage of its development and its results, some of which are summarised in the paper, have been utilised to support the new masterplan of the hydrosystem management.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. de Kok, J.-L., and H. G. Wind, Design and application of decision-support systems for integrated water management: lessons to be learnt, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 28(14-15), 571-578, 2003.
    2. #Xu, C., Huang, Q., Zhao, M., and Tian, F., Economical operation of hydropower plant based on self-adaptive mutation evolutionary programming, Fifth World Congress on Intelligent Control and Automation, Vol. 6, 5646-5648, 2004.
    3. Parcharidis, I., E. Lagios, V. Sakkas, D. Raucoules, D. Feurer, S. Le Mouelic, C. King, C. Carnec, F. Novali, A. Ferretti, R. Capes, and G. Cooksley, Subsidence monitoring within the Athens Basin (Greece) using space radar interferometric techniques, Earth Planets Space, 58(5), 505-513, 2006.
    4. #Makropoulos, C., Decision support tools for water demand management, Water Demand Management, D. Butler and F.A. Memon (eds.), IWA Publishing, 331-353, 2006.
    5. #Othman, F., and M. Naseri, Decision support systems in water resources management, Proceedings of the 9th Asia Pacific Industrial Engineering and Management Systems Conference, 1772-1780, Nusa Dua, Bali, 2008.
    6. Kizito, F., H. Mutikanga, G. Ngirane-Katashaya, and R. Thunvik, Development of decision support tools for decentralised urban water supply management in Uganda: An Action Research approach, Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 33(2), 122-137, 2009.
    7. #Comas, J., and M. Poch, Decision support systems for integrated water resources management under water scarcity, Water Scarcity in the Mediterranean: Perspectives Under Global Change, S. Sabater and D. Barcelo (eds.), The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2009.
    8. Silva-Hidalgo, H., I. R. Martín-Domínguez, M. T. Alarcón-Herrera, and A. Granados-Olivas, Mathematical modelling for the integrated management of water resources in hydrological basins, Water Resources Management, 23 (4), 721-730, 2009.
    9. #Wang, B., and H. Cheng, Regional environmental risk management decision support system based on optimization model for Minhang District in Shanghai, Challenges in Environmental Science and Computer Engineering, 1, 14-17, 2010 International Conference on Challenges in Environmental Science and Computer Engineering, 2010.
    10. #Zhang, R., J. Wei, J. Lu, and G. Zhang, A Decision Support System for Ore Blending Cost Optimization Problem of Blast Furnaces, In: G. Phillips-Wren et al. (Eds.), Advances in Intelligent Decision Technologies, Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies, 1(4), III, 143-152, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2010.
    11. #Καρύμπαλης, Ε., Το νερό της Αθήνας: οι επιπτώσεις στον Μόρνο και τον Εύηνο, Γεωγραφίες, 15, 75-93, 2010.
    12. Sechi, G. M., and A. Sulis, Drought mitigation using operative indicators in complex water systems, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C, 35(3-5), 195-203, 2010.
    13. Zhang, R., J. Lu, and G. Zhang, A knowledge-based multi-role decision support system for ore blending cost optimization of blast furnaces, European Journal of Operational Research, 215(1), 194-203, doi: 10.1016/j.ejor.2011.05.037, 2011.
    14. Gallardo, M. M., P. Merino, L. Panizo, and A. Linares, A practical use of model checking for synthesis: generating a dam controller for flood management, Software: Practice and Experience, 41(11), 1329-1347, DOI: 10.1002/spe.1048, 2011.
    15. Zeng, Y., Y. Cai, P. Jia, and H. Jee, Development of a web-based decision support system for supporting integrated water resources management in Daegu City, South Korea, Expert Systems with Applications, 39(11), 10091-10102, 2012.
    16. Patil, A., and Z.-Q. Deng, Input data measurement-induced uncertainty in watershed modelling, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 57(1), 118–133, 2012.
    17. Zhang, X. Q., H. Gao, and X. Yu, A multiobjective decision framework for river basin management, Applied Mechanics and Materials, 238, 288-291, 2012.
    18. Ge, Y., X. Li, C. Huang, and Z. Nan, A decision support system for irrigation water allocation along the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China, Environmental Modelling & Software, 47, 182-192, 2013.
    19. Adewumi, J. R., A. A. Ilemobade, and J. E. van Zyl, Application of a multi-criteria decision support tool in assessing the feasibility of implementing treated wastewater reuse, International Journal of Decision Support System Technology, 5(1), 1-23, 2013.
    20. Sahoo, S. N., and P. Sreeja, A review of decision support system applications in flood management, International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology, 3, 206–220, 2013.
    21. #Aher, P. D., J. Adinarayana, S. D. Gorantiwar, and S. A. Sawant, Information system for integrated watershed management using remote sensing and GIS, Remote Sensing Applications in Environmental Research, 17-34, Society of Earth Scientists Series, 2014.
    22. Nouiri, I., Multi-objective tool to optimize the water resources management using genetic algorithm and the Pareto optimality concept, Water Resources Management, 28(10), 2885-2901, 2014.
    23. Heracleous, C., Z. Zinonos, and C. Panayiotou, Water supply optimization: An IPA approach, IFAC Proceedings Volumes: 12th IFAC/IEEE Workshop on Discrete Event Systems, 47(2), 265-270, doi:10.3182/20140514-3-FR-4046.00088, 2014.
    24. #Heidari A., and E. Bozorgzadeh, Decision Support System for water resources planning in Karun river basin, International Symposium on Dams in a Global Environmental Challenges, 35-45, Bali, Indonesia, 2014.
    25. Stefanovic, N., I. Radojevic, A. Ostojic, L. Comic, and M. Topuzovic, Composite web information system for management of water resources, Water Resources Management, 29(7), 2285-2301, doi:10.1007/s11269-015-0941-y, 2015.
    26. Nouiri, I., F. Chemak, D. Mansour, H. Bellali, J. Ghrab, J. Baaboub, and M. K. Chahed, Impacts of irrigation water management on consumption indicators and exposure to the vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia, International Journal of Agricultural Policy and Research, 3(2), 93-103, doi:10.15739/IJAPR.031, 2015.
    27. Nouiri , I., M. Yitayew, J. Maßmann, and J. Tarhouni, Multi-objective optimization tool for integrated groundwater management, Water Resources Management, 29(14), 5353-5375, doi:10.1007/s11269-015-1122-8, 2015.
    28. Wang, G., S. Mang, H. Cai, S. Liu, Z. Zhang, L. Wang, and J. L. Innes, Integrated watershed management: evolution, development and emerging trends, Journal of Forestry Research, 27(5), 967–994, doi:10.1007/s11676-016-0293-3, 2016.
    29. #Tzortzakis, G., E. Katsiri, G. Karavokiros, C. Makropoulos, and A. Delis, Tethys: sensor-based aquatic quality monitoring in waterways, Proceedings of 17th IEEE International Conference on Mobile Data Management (MDM), 329-332, doi:10.1109/MDM.2016.56, 2016.
    30. Heidari, A., Application of multidisciplinary water resources planning tools for two of the largest rivers of Iran, Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research, doi:10.1080/23249676.2016.1215271, 2016.
    31. Kochilakis, G., D. Poursanidis, N. Chrysoulakis, V. Varella, V. Kotroni, G. Eftychidis, K. Lagouvardos, C. Papathanasioud, G. Karavokyros, M. Aivazoglou, C. Makropoulosd, and M. Mimikou, A web based DSS for the management of floods and wildfires (FLIRE) in urban and periurban areas, Environmental Modelling and Software, 86, 111-115, doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2016.09.016, 2016.
    32. Bouziotas, D., and M. Ertsen, Socio-hydrology from the bottom up: A template for agent-based modeling in irrigation systems, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, doi:10.5194/hess-2017-107, 2017.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, On the representation of hyetograph characteristics by stochastic rainfall models, Journal of Hydrology, 251, 65–87, 2001.

    Two stochastic models of the rainfall process, belonging to different categories, are compared in terms of how well they reproduce certain hyetograph characteristics. The first is the scaling model of storm hyetograph, which belongs to the category of storm-based models. The second is the Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model, the most widespread among the category of point process models. The scaling model is further developed introducing one more parameter to better fit historical data. The Bartlett-Lewis model is theoretically studied to extract mathematical relationships for the intra-storm structure. The intercomparison is based on the storm hyetographs of a data set from Greece and another one from USA. The different storms are identified in each data set and classified according to their duration. Both models are fitted using the characteristics of storms. The comparison shows that the scaling model of storm hyetograph agrees well with the structure of historical hyetographs whereas the Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model exhibits some discrepancies in either its original version or its random parameter version. However, it is shown that the performance of the Bartlett-Lewis model is significantly improved, and becomes comparable to that of the scaling model, by introducing a power-law dependence of its cell related parameters (duration and rate of arrivals) on the storm duration.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-1694(01)00441-3

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Abi-Zeid, I., E. Parent, B. Bobee, The stochastic modeling of low flows by the alternating point processes approach: methodology and application, Journal of Hydrology, 285(1-4), 41-61, 2004.
    2. #Frost, A. J., R. Srikanthan and P. S. P. Cowpertwait, Stochastic Generation of Point Rainfall Data at Subdaily Timescales: A Comparison of DRIP and NSRP, ISBN 1 920813 14 4, CRC for Catchment Hydrology, 2004.
    3. #Blöschl, G., Statistical upscaling and downscaling in hydrology, Encyclopedia of Hydrological Sciences, Ch. 9, Part 1. Theory, Organization and Scale, M. G. Anderson (ed.) 2061–2080, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, 2005.
    4. #Konecny, F., and P. Strauss, Hyetograph simulation of high-intense rainfall events, AGU Hydrology Days 2008, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, 43-51, 2008.
    5. Ellouze, M., H. Abida, and R. Safi, A triangular model for the generation of synthetic hyetographs, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 54(2), 287-299, 2009.
    6. Unami, K., F. K. Abagale, M. Yangyuoru, A. M. B. Alam and G. Kranjac-Berisavljevic, A stochastic differential equation model for assessing drought and flood risks, Stochastic Environmental Research And Risk Assessment, 24 (5), 725-733, 2010.
    7. Pui, A., A. Sharma, R. Mehrotra, B. Sivakumar and E. Jeremiah, A comparison of alternatives for daily to sub-daily rainfall disaggregation, Journal of Hydrology, 470–471, 138–157, 2012.
    8. Anis, M. R., and M. Rode, A new magnitude-category disaggregation approach for temporal high-resolution rainfall intensities, Hydrological Processes, 10.1002/hyp.10227, 2014.

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Influence of atmospheric circulation types in space-time distribution of intense rainfall, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 101 (D21), 26267–26276, 1996.

    The influence of the prevailing weather situation on the temporal evolution and geographical distribution of intense rainfall is studied, as a potential tool to improve rainfall prediction. A classification scheme of the atmospheric circulation over the east Mediterranean territory is used for the analysis. The study area is the Sterea Hellas region (central Greece) with an area of about 25,000 km2. Daily data from 71 rain gages and hourly data from three rain recorders over a 20 year period are used. From these data sets, the intense rainfall events were extracted and analyzed. Several empirical and statistical methods (also including the available tools of a Geographical Information System) are used for the analysis and comparison of rainfall distribution both in time and in space. The analysis shows that the contribution of the concept of weather types to the quantitative point rainfall prediction in short timescale is small, and only the estimation of the probability of occurrence of an intense event is feasible. On the contrary, the relation between the spatial distribution of rainfall and the atmospheric circulation patterns is significant and may be used for improving the forecasting of the geographical distribution of rainfall.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/96JD01377

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Nalbantis, I., Real-time flood forecasting with the use of inadequate data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 45(2), 269-284, 2000.
    2. Stehlik, J., and A. Bardossy, Multivariate stochastic downscaling model for generating daily precipitation series based on atmospheric circulation, Journal of Hydrology, 256(1-2), 120-141, 2002.
    3. Anderson, B.T., Regional simulation of intraseasonal variations in the summertime hydrologic cycle over the southwestern United States, J. Climate, 15 (17), 2282-2300, 2002.
    4. Anderson, B.T., and J.O. Roads, Regional simulation of summertime precipitation over the southwestern United States, J. Climate, 15 (23), 3321-3342, 2002
    5. Rudari, R., D. Entekhabi and G. Roth, Terrain and multiple-scale interactions as factors in generating extreme precipitation events, Journal of Hydrometeorology, 5 (3), 390-404, 2004.
    6. Rudari, R., D. Entekhabi and G. Roth, Large-scale atmospheric patterns associated with mesoscale features leading to extreme precipitation events in Northwestern Italy, Advances in Water Resources, 28(6), 601-614, 2005.
    7. Boni, G., A. Parodi and R. Rudari, Extreme rainfall events: Learning from raingauge time series, Journal of Hydrology, 327(3-4), 304-314, 2006.
    8. Vrac, M. and P. Naveau, Stochastic downscaling of precipitation: From dry events to heavy rainfalls, Water Resources Research, 43(7), W07402, 2007.
    9. Troin, M., M. Vrac, M. Khodri, C. Vallet-Coulomb, E. Piovano and F. Sylvestre, Coupling statistically downscaled GCM outputs with a basin-lake hydrological model in subtropical South America: evaluation of the influence of large-scale precipitation changes on regional hydroclimate variability, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 7, 9523-9565, doi: 10.5194/hessd-7-9523-2010, 2010.
    10. Karagiorgos, K., S. Fuchs, T. Thaler, M. Chiari, F. Maris and J. Hübl, A flood hazard database for Greece, Wildbach- und Lawinenverbau, 77 (170), 264-277, 2013.
    11. Panagoulia, D., P. Economou and C. Caroni, Stationary and nonstationary generalized extreme value modelling of extreme precipitation over a mountainous area under climate change, Environmetrics, 25 (1), 29-43, 2014.

Book chapters and fully evaluated conference publications

  1. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Irrigation challenges in NW Greece-Perspectives and solutions for flood prone areas, 14th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (CEST2015), Global Network on Environmental Science and Technology, University of the Aegean, 2015.

    Multiple water needs in rural areas together with poor water resources management are often posing serious threats to the environment and can cause rapid depletion of water resources. Irrigation, an activity that accounts for 44% of total water use in Europe, a share that can reach up to 80% in parts of southern Europe, is significantly affected by water scarcity with far reaching social, economic, environmental and demographic impacts. In many rural areas excessive groundwater use for irrigation in conjunction with obsolete water practices are among the key factors responsible for the depletion of water resources. Significant water losses also occur through outdated irrigation networks and structural deficiencies on water conveyors. Moreover, environmental hazards are intensified in agricultural areas lacking appropriate flood mitigation structures. In these cases, during flood events, fertilizers and other contaminants are easily spread over large areas posing permanent treats to ecosystems and natural resources. This paper presents a holistic water resources management approach towards adequate flood protection of rural areas, while at the same time reversing the depletion of overexploited local underground resources. More specifically, a series of technical works including two interconnected reservoirs and a number of small detention ponds are proposed to protect an irrigated area of 1.900 ha which is frequently devastated by floods. Water from the detention reservoirs will also be used to cover irrigation needs of the cultivated areas, which currently overuse underground resources. At the same time, reservoir water will be used to irrigate an adjacent area of extra 1.900 ha, with no other available water recourses, thus extending arable land to 3.600 ha in total. It is also proposed to exploit the considerable height difference (275 m) between the two reservoirs for electricity production. Stopping water pumping for irrigation will return groundwater table to its natural level, a process which is expected to take several years to complete. A list of other structural and non-structural measures is also proposed to further improve water management in the area.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1575/1/documents/CEST2015_Papadates_Full_paper.pdf (1029 KB)

  1. S. Mihas, A. Efstratiadis, K. Nikolaou, and N. Mamassis, Drought and water scarcity management plan for the Peloponnese river basin districts, 12th International Conference “Protection & Restoration of the Environment”, Skiathos, Dept. of Civil Engineering and Dept. of Planning & Regional Development, Univ. Thessaly, Stevens Instute of Technology, 2014.

    The drought and water scarcity management plan was drafted for the Peloponnese River Basin Districts as outlined by the implementation of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC in Greece by the Special Secretariat of Water (Ministry of Environment Energy & Climate Change). The evaluation of hydrological droughts was mainly based on precipitation data, which was used to evaluate the SPI index at several time scales (from 3-month to 5-year). Moreover, the drought hazard was evaluated, taking into consideration the demands and the water resources availability, at various spatial scales. For this aim, we developed an innovative methodology, based on the estimation of a temporally varying water exploitation index, as generalization of the typical WEI. The possibilities of predicting drought events, by using simple statistical models and evaluating the probabilities of transition from the current carrying water condition to the next are also examined. Additionally, an operational plan for drought prediction is elaborated, on the basis of representative hydrologic data that is retrieved twice a year i.e. at the end of the first trimester and semester of the hydrological year. Finally, we provide guidance for the operational implementation of the above methodology by the competent authorities and its link to specific management measures depending on the classification of each drought event, at the alert scale.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1458/1/documents/A216_paper_hSRt2DZ.pdf (1188 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Views on ancient Hellenic science and technology, IWA Regional Symposium on Water, Wastewater & Environment: Traditions & Culture, Patras, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2702.6163, International Water Association, 2014.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1438/1/documents/patra_22_3_14_1.pdf (5352 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.2702.6163

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Information technologies in hydrometeorological data management in Greece, Honorary Edition for for Professor Emeritus D. Tolikas, edited by K. L. Katsifarakis and M. Vafiadis, 27–37, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1165.5928, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2013.

    The record keeping of hydrometeorological measurements is particularly important infrastructure for research and technology, but it is also extremely useful for the industry and administration. In Greece, efforts for bringing together the data belonging to various institutions and their organization into a common base started in the 1990s with the Hydroscope project. Today this database is available on the Internet (www.hydroscope.gr) within a larger system that includes geographical information, software applications for data processing and a digital library of documents related to water resources. Ensuring updating the database with new measurements is particularly useful as the country's infrastructure and as a means for implementation in the country of the EU Directives related to water.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1416/1/documents/2013Hydroscope.pdf (1076 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1165.5928

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, N. Kappos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological network for flood monitoring and modeling, Proceedings of First International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of Environment, Paphos, Cyprus, 8795, 10-1–10-10, doi:10.1117/12.2028621, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2013.

    Due to its highly fragmented geomorphology, Greece comprises hundreds of small- to medium-size hydrological basins, in which often the terrain is fairly steep and the streamflow regime ephemeral. These are typically affected by flash floods, occasionally causing severe damages. Yet, the vast majority of them lack flow-gauging infrastructure providing systematic hydrometric data at fine time scales. This has obvious impacts on the quality and reliability of flood studies, which typically use simplistic approaches for ungauged basins that do not consider local peculiarities in sufficient detail. In order to provide a consistent framework for flood design and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk –a key issue of the 2007/60/EC Directive– it is essential to improve the monitoring infrastructures by taking advantage of modern technologies for remote control and data management. In this context and in the research project DEUCALION, we have recently installed and are operating, in four pilot river basins, a telemetry-based hydro-meteorological network that comprises automatic stations and is linked to and supported by relevant software. The hydrometric stations measure stage, using 50-kHz ultrasonic pulses or piezometric sensors, or both stage (piezometric) and velocity via acoustic Doppler radar; all measurements are being temperature-corrected. The meteorological stations record air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. Data transfer is made via GPRS or mobile telephony modems. The monitoring network is supported by a web-based application for storage, visualization and management of geographical and hydro-meteorological data (ENHYDRIS), a software tool for data analysis and processing (HYDROGNOMON), as well as an advanced model for flood simulation (HYDROGEIOS). The recorded hydro-meteorological observations are accessible over the Internet through the www-application. The system is operational and its functionality has been implemented as open-source software for use in a wide range of applications in the field of water resources monitoring and management, such as the demonstration case study outlined in this work.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2028621

  1. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, openmeteo.org: a web service for the dissemination of free meteorological data, Advances in Meteorology, Climatology and Atmospheric Physics, edited by C.G. Helmis and P. Nastos, Athens, 203–208, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-29172-2_29, Springer, Athens, 2012.

    Individuals or organisations managing meteorological or hydrological stations typically need to either collect the data on personal computers or bear the costs required to setup a server. As an alternative, the openmeteo.org database provides users and organisations the option to upload their time series, on condition that their data will be available to the public under a free license (the Open Database License and the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, depending on the type of data). Each user has write access to his own data, whereas the public has read access to all the data. Enhydris, the software that powers openmeteo.org, is also free, available under the GNU General Public License v.3, and provides several useful features like time series graphs and plots, display of online data, maps etc. The purpose of openmeteo.org is not only to enable people to manage their data more easily, but also to bring people into a community and encourage a spirit of openness and sharing.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-29172-2_29

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Zarkadoulas, N. Mamassis, A. N. Angelakis, and L. W. Mays, The evolution of water supply throughout the millennia: A short overview, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, 21, 553–560, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2541.8485, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://books.google.gr/books?id=WxXu83RxSNwC&pg=PA553&source=gbs_toc_r&cad=3#v=onepage&q&f=false

  1. N. Zarkadoulas, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. N. Angelakis, A brief history of urban water management in ancient Greece, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, 10, 259–270, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4114.7127, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://books.google.gr/books?id=WxXu83RxSNwC&pg=PA259&source=gbs_toc_r&cad=3#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Mithen, S., Thirst for Water and Power in the Ancient World, 384 pp., Harvard University Press, 2012.
    2. Voudouris, K. S., Y. Christodoulakos, F. Steiakakis and A. N. Angelakis, Hydrogeological characteristics of Hellenic aqueducts-like Qanats, Water, 5, 1326-1345, 2013.
    3. De Feo, G., A. N. Angelakis, G. P. Antoniou, F. El-Gohary, B. Haut, C. W. Passchier and X. Y. Zheng, Historical and technical notes on aqueducts from prehistoric to medieval times, Water, 5, 1996-2025, 2013.
    4. Smith, M. L., The archaeology of urban landscapes, Annual Review of Anthropology, 43, 307-323, 2014.

  1. A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Prolegomena: The evolution of water supply through the millennia, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, edited by A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, xxi–xxii, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1542.4245, IWA Publishing, 2012.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1542.4245

  1. E. Kountouri, N. Petrochilos, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, N. Zarkadoulas, A. Vött, H. Hadler, P. Henning, and T. Willershäuser, A new project of surface survey, geophysical and excavation research of the mycenaean drainage works of the North Kopais: the first study season, 3rd IWA Specialized Conference on Water & Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, Istanbul, Turkey, 467–476, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2328.8563, International Water Association, 2012.

    The attempt to drain the Kopais Lake is one of the most impressive and ambitious technical works of prehistoric times in Greece. The size and the importance of this achievement inspired myths and traditions referring to its construction and operation, as well as to its final destruction, which is attributed to Heracles. The impressive remnants of the Mycenaean hydraulic works that were discovered represent the most important land reclamation effort, of prehistoric Greek antiquity, attracting thus the attention of the international scientific community. Nevertheless, in spite of the minor or extended surveys that followed, the picture of the prehistoric drainage works in Kopais remained ambiguous, since the proposed theories as far as it concerns their function and their precise date within the Bronze Age, were based solely on indications from the surface survey and not on documentation depending upon archaeological or geophysical methods. The new project with an interdisciplinary approach and interpretation of the Mycenaean drainage works of Kopais, is conducted by the Greek Ministry of Culture and Tourism in collaboration with the Department of Water Resources and the Environmental Engineering of the National Technical University of Athens and the Institute of Geography of the University of Mainz. The results of the first study season will be presented here.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1204/1/documents/2012WWTAC_Copais.pdf (1012 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.2328.8563

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Petropoulos, M., The cult and the use of water in Ancient Greece with emphasis the ancient city Patras, IWA Regional Symposium on Water, Wastewater & Environment: Traditions & Culture (ed. by I. K. Kalavrouziotis and A. N. Angelakis), Patras, Greece, 14-26, International Water Association & Hellenic Open University, 2014.
    2. Giannakos, K., The technology of land reclamation, drainage and irrigation projects in MBA–LBA Greece and possible implications, Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia, 4, 68-78, 2015.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Zarkadoulas, and Y. Markonis, Floods in Greece, Changes of Flood Risk in Europe, edited by Z. W. Kundzewicz, Chapter 12, 238–256, IAHS Press, Wallingford – International Association of Hydrological Sciences, 2012.

    The flood regime in Greece is investigated, from the early past to modern years. Large-scale floods, mainly due to deglaciation processes (also known as palaeofloods), together with earthquakes and volcanoes, are the major mechanisms that formed the current diverse Greek terrain. The influence of these impressive phenomena is reflected in some ancient myths, also reflecting earlier efforts of flood control and management. The struggle of humans against the destructive power of floods is further testified by several structures revealed by archaeological research. In modern times, the dramatic change of the demographic and socio-economic conditions made imperative the construction of large-scale water projects, which in turn resulted in large-scale environmental changes. The consequences of these practices, both positive and negative, are discussed, with regard to the problem of floods in Greece.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780203098097/

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Kundzewicz, Z. W., Introduction, Changes of Flood Risk in Europe, IAHS-AISH Publication, (SPEC. ISS. 10), (ed. Z. W. Kundzewicz), 1-7, 2012.
    2. Mentzafou, A. and Dimitriou, E.: Flood risk assessment for a heavily modified urban stream, Proc. IAHS, 366, 147-148, 10.5194/piahs-366-147-2015, 2015.
    3. Karagiorgos, K., M. Heiser, T. Thaler, J. Hübl, and S. Fuchs, Micro-sized enterprises: vulnerability to flash floods, Natural Hazards, doi:10.1007/s11069-016-2476-9, 2016.

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A web based information system for the inspection of the hydraulic works in Ancient Greece, Ancient Water Technologies, edited by L. W. Mays, 103–114, doi:10.1007/978-90-481-8632-7_6, Springer, Dordrecht, 2010.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/984/1/documents/2010AncientWaterTechnologies_WebSystem.pdf (406 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-8632-7_6

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #De Feo, G., P. Laureano, L. W. Mays and A. N. Angelakis, Water supply management technologies in the Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, Ch. 14 in Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia (A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis and N. Mamassis, eds.), 351-382, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

  1. N. Evelpidou, N. Mamassis, A. Vassilopoulos, C. Makropoulos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Flooding in Athens: The Kephisos River flood event of 21-22/10/1994, International Conference on Urban Flood Management, Paris, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4065.5601, UNESCO, 2009.

    During the night of the 20th of October 1994, a cold front passed over Greece, provoking heavy precipitation and consequently catastrophic floods in many areas of Greece. In some of the affected areas, the precipitation height was equivalent to 140 mm, while in the center of Athens the respective quantity was more than 140 mm. The Greater Athens area experienced one of the most devastating flood events in years, during which nine deaths were reported along with severe damages in the transportation, telecommunication and energy infrastructures. Dozens of homes and stores flooded, cars totally damaged, three buildings collapsed and hundreds of people trapped in cars and buildings give the outline of the disastrous impacts.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1163/1/documents/Kifissos_Chapter_COST22_v3.pdf (2115 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4065.5601

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Kandilioti, G. and C. Makropoulos, Preliminary flood risk assessment: the case of Athens, Nat. Hazards, DOI: 10.1007/s11069-011-9930-5, 2011.
    2. #Hildén, M., R. Dankers, T. Kjeldsen, J. Hannaford, C. Kuhlicke, E. Kuusisto, C. Makropoulos, A. te Linde, F. Ludwig, J. Luther and H. Wolters, Floods – vulnerability, risks and management, A joint report of ETC CCA and ICM, European Environment Agency, 2012.
    3. #Vanneuville, W., B. Werner, R. Uhel, et al., Water Resources in Europe in the Context of Vulnerability, EEA 2012 State of Water Assessment, European Environment Agency, 2012.
    4. Evrenoglou, L. S. A. Partsinevelou, P. Stamatis, A. Lazaris, E. Patsouris, C. Kotampasi and P. Nicolopoulou-Stamati, Children exposure to trace levels of heavy metals at the north zone of Kifissos River, Science of The Total Environment, 443, 650-661, 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.11.041, 2013.
    5. Diakakis, M., An inventory of flood events in Athens, Greece, during the last 130 years: Seasonality and spatial distribution, Journal of Flood Risk Management, 10.1111/jfr3.12053, 2013.
    6. Diakakis, M., A. Pallikarakis and K. Katsetsiadou, Using a spatio-temporal GIS database to monitor the spatial evolution of urban flooding phenomena: the case of Athens Metropolitan Area in Greece, ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, 3 (1), 96-109, 2014.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, New approaches to estimation of extreme rainfall, 1st Hellenic Conference on Large Dams, Larisa, 2, 433–440, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1116.4400, Hellenic Commission on Large Dams, Technical Chamber of Greece, 2008.

    The extreme rainfall modeling is essential for the evaluation of the flood risk and the design of spillways. Despite the intense research and the accumulating availability of rainfall data, the uncertainty in the evaluation of the extreme rainfalls, continues to be high. Obviously, this uncertainty has a greater influence to the design of large-scale structures (dam spillways) than to the design of smaller flood control hydraulic works. This paper provides a review of the most recent methods for extreme rainfall estimation and presents their theoretical setting and their results in comparison with more classical methods, based on some applications in the design of hydraulic works in Greece. Finally, a software package (Hydrognomon) that supports the use of the methods is presented.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/888/1/documents/paper_dam.pdf (327 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1116.4400

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Physical, social and technological aspects of drought - The Athens example, Natural and Technological Disasters in Europe and Greece, edited by K. Sapountzaki, 61–88, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1640.7289, Gutenberg, Athens, 2007.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/797/1/documents/2007Drought.pdf (497 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1640.7289

  1. N. Mamassis, V. Kanellopoulos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A web based information system for the inspection of the hydraulic works in Ancient Greece, 5th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics, Tempe, Arizona, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3475.7362, International Association of Hydraulic Research, 2007.

    The ancient civilizations that had prospered on the Greek territory since 3000 BC had a great contribution to philosophy, politics, physical sciences and arts. Several technical works were constructed during that period to support the infrastructure needs of those spiritually developed societies. Particularly, the hydraulic works were very important, because of the: (a) advanced technologies that had been used, (b) high standards of life that served and (c) sustainable water management practices that the designers adopted. These works supported the water supply, the drainage of the lands and the cities, the flood protection, the sanitary facilities and sometimes the use of water for recreational purposes. Several simple (cisterns, wells, aqueducts) or more advanced (dams, tunnels, siphons) hydraulic structures have been found, spread all over the wider Ancient Greek territory. Their presence reveals that ancient Greeks wisely resolved several problems concerning water that modern societies still have to face up. In this study, a web based application is presented, for the inspection of available information about the hydraulics works in Ancient Greece. The application includes the necessary informatics tools to manipulate and analyze the various information types and make the information available on the internet. Information includes technical characteristics of the structures, drawings, maps, texts, papers, studies, photos, videos etc. The main purposes of the application are the easy access to available information and the facilitation of its analysis. The latter can be achieved by using a Database and a Geographical Information System, to perform queries or to make maps.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3475.7362

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Stergiouli, M. L., and K. Hadjibiros, The growing water imprint of Athens (Greece) throughout history, Regional Environmental Change, 12 (2), 337-345, 2012.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Logical and illogical exegeses of hydrometeorological phenomena in ancient Greece, Proceedings of the 1st IWA International Symposium on Water and Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, edited by A. N. Angelakis and D. Koutsoyiannis, Iraklio, 135–143, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4188.4408, International Water Association, 2006.

    Technological applications aiming at the exploitation of the natural sources appear in all ancient civilizations. The unique phenomenon in the ancient Greek civilization is that technological needs triggered physical explanations of the natural phenomena and behaviours, thus enabling the foundation of philosophy and science. Among these, the study of hydrometeorological phenomena had a major role. This study begins with the Ionian philosophers in the seventh century BC, continues in classical Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BC, and advances and expands through the entire Greek world up to the end of Hellenistic period, when Romans conquered Greece. Many of the theories developed in the course of ancient Greek civilization are erroneous according to modern views. However, many elements in Greek exegeses and interpretations of various hydrometeorological processes, such as the evaporation and condensation of vapour, the creation of clouds, hail, snow and rainfall and the evolution of hydrological cycle, are impressive even today.

    Related works:

    • [22] Revised version of the same article.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4188.4408

  1. A. Grammatikoyiannis, N. Mamassis, E. Baltas, and M. Mimikou, A meteorological telemetric network for monitoring of the Athens wider area (Meteonet). A real time approach from point to areal measurements, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (9CEST), Rhodes, Department of Environmental Studies, University of the Aegean, 2005.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/867/1/documents/2005_meteonet.pdf (230 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Christofides, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological data acquisition, management and analysis for the Athens water supply system, BALWOIS Conference on Water Observation and Information System for Decision Support, Ochrid, FYROM, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1845.5284, Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning FYROM, Skopie, 2004.

    A hydrolometeorological telemetric network has been installed, in the framework of a decision support system (DSS) for the management of the Athens water resource system, that extends over an area of 5000 km2. In this paper the telemetric network and data management and analysis are described. The information collected includes meteorological data, reservoir water levels and stream flow data. The data acquisition procedure is executed periodically, by a computer at the data centre and all data is stored in the database for immediate use by other subsystems of the DSS. Some data by conventional instruments are also stored for comparison and tests. A software application (Hydrognomon) is used for management and analysis of the various types of raw data and for producing a large number of derivative time series. The whole procedure has been standardised for easy implementation in other similar networks.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1845.5284

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Grammatokogiannis, A., N. Mamassis, E. Baltas and M. Mimikou, A meteorological telemetric network for monitoring of the Athens wider Area, Proc. 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, Rhodes, Greece, 2005.
    2. Meyer, M.L., and G.M. Huey, Telemetric system for hydrology and water quality monitoring in watersheds of northern New Mexico, USA, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 116(1-3), 9-19, 2006.

  1. A. Tsouni, D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Contoes, N. Mamassis, and P. Elias, Estimation of actual evapotranspiration by remote sensing: Application in Thessalia plain, Greece, Proceedings of the International Conference "Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing: Environmental Applications", Volos, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3025.1763, 2003.

    As evapotranspiration is one of the main components of hydrologic cycle, its estimation is very important. Remote sensing technologies can assist to improve the estimation accuracy also providing means for computing evapotranspiration geographical distribution. In the present study, the daily actual evapotranspiration was calculated for 21 days uniformly distributed during the 2001 summer season over Thessaly plain. Three different methods were accordingly adapted and applied: the remote-sensing methods by Granger (Granger, 2000) and Carlson-Buffum (Carlson & Buffum, 1989) using satellite data together with ground meteorological measurements and an adapted FAO Penman-Monteith method, used as reference method. Satellite data, following the necessary processing, were used in conjunction with surface data from the three closest meteorological stations. All three methods, following their appropriate adaptation, exploit visible channels 1 and 2 of NOAA-AVHRR satellite images to calculate albedo and NDVI and infrared channels 4 and 5 to calculate surface temperature. FAO Penman-Monteith and Granger methods require mean surface temperatures, so NOAA-15 satellite images were used. For Carlson-Buffum method a combination of NOAA-14 and NOAA-15 satellite images was used, since the average rate of surface temperature rise during the morning is required. The results of the application are encouraging. Both Carlson-Buffum and Granger methods follow in general the variations of the FAO Penman-Monteith method. However, they underestimate evapotranspiration during the days with relatively high wind speed.

    Related works:

    • [21] Posterior more complete version.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/798/1/documents/2003GISConfThessalyEvapor.pdf (357 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3025.1763

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A hydrometeorological telemetric network for the water resources monitoring of the Athens water resource system, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of European Water Resources Association: "Water Resources Management in the Era of Transition", edited by G. Tsakiris, Athens, 157–163, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3954.9683, European Water Resources Association, 2002.

    In the development of a decision support system (DSS) for the management of the Athens water resource system, special emphasis has been given to the real time feeding of the DSS with reliable hydrological data, using a telemetric system. This paper is concentrated on the description of this telemetric system that measures hydrometeorological variables of the river basins, and on the management of the telemetric data. The stations of the telemetric system can provide data of high reliability, without delay, and less costly than conventionally measured data. The information collected includes stage and discharge data from the main stream of each river basin, water level data of the reservoirs, rainfall and meteorological data. The data collection procedure is done periodically by the central telemetric system and all data is stored in the database for immediate use by other systems. Apart from feeding the DSS, the telemetric system will serve other purposes such as the monitoring and establishment of reliable time series of the atmospheric and water resources conditions of the area, and the supply of hydrometerological information in real time on the Internet.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/550/1/documents/2002EWRAMeteo.pdf (349 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3954.9683

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Grammatokogiannis, A., N. Mamassis, E. Baltas and M. Mimikou, A meteorological telemetric network for monitoring of the Athens wider Area, Proc. 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, Rhodes, Greece, 2005.
    2. #Mimikou, M., and A. Grammatikogiannis,Real-time monitoring and management of point and areal hydrometeorological data in the Athens metropolitan area, IAHS-AISH Publication 308, 31-36, 2006.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Christofides, Experience from the operation of the automatic telemetric meteorological station in the National Technical University, Proceedings of the 8th National Congress of the Greek Hydrotechnical Association, edited by G. Christodoulou, A. Stamou, and A. Nanou, Athens, 301–308, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4577.5603, Greek Hydrotechnical Association, 2000.

    An automatic telemetric meteorological station has been set up in the National Technical University of Athens campus at Zographou, whose operation has completed six years. Several types of sensors and devices for energy supply, as well as techniques for data acquisition, logging and transmission were tested. Emphasis was given to the direct availability and easy access to the data, both real time and historical, for any interested user. To this aim, the Internet was utilised and several software applications were developed to allow data access through the World Wide Web.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4577.5603

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Grammatokogiannis, A., N. Mamassis, E. Baltas and M. Mimikou, A meteorological telemetric network for monitoring of the Athens wider Area, Proc. 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, Rhodes, Greece, 2005.

  1. N. Mamassis, et D. Koutsoyiannis, Structure stochastique de pluies intenses par type de temps, Publications de l'Association Internationale de Climatologie, 6eme Colloque International de Climatologie, edité par P. Maheras, Thessaloniki, 6, 301–313, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3643.6726, Association Internationale de Climatologie, Aix-en-Provence Cedex, France, 1993.

    We studied the influence of weather types on the stochastic structure of the intense rainfall events. We used hourly rainfall depths from three rain recorders in Evinos River basin while the corresponding weather types were determined based on classification by Maheras (1982). Initially, we calculated the frequency of occurrence of intense rainfall events for each weather type. Also, we calculated the statistics of the rainfall event characteristics (duration, the hourly and the total rainfall depth), including the autocorrelation and cross correlation functions of hourly depths. To detect statistically significant differences between event characteristics for different weather types, we applied various statistical tests and analysis of variance.

    Related works:

    • [26] Μεταγενέστερη και πληρέστερη εργασία.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/39/3/documents/1993AICTypeDeTemps-ocr.pdf (1409 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3643.6726

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Stehlik, J., and A. Bardossy, Multivariate stochastic downscaling model for generating daily precipitation series based on atmospheric circulation, Journal of Hydrology, 256(1-2), 120-141, 2002.

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, et D. Koutsoyiannis, Le phénomène recent de sécheresse persistante et l' alimentation en eau de la cité d' Athènes, Publications de l'Association Internationale de Climatologie, 6eme Colloque International de Climatologie, edité par P. Maheras, Thessaloniki, 6, 123–132, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4430.1041, Association Internationale de Climatologie, Aix-en-Provence Cedex, France, 1993.

    We analyse statistically the historic hydrologic samples of the water basins of Mornos and B. Kifissos-Yliki. A decreasing trend on the precipitation and runoff for the B. Kifissos basin was found. Moreover, a significant reduction of the annual inflows was found for the period of the recent six-year drought for both basins. The analysis of precipitation did not reveal any significant reduction on their annual values, but it is rather their within-year distribution that has been substantially modified. More specifically, the precipitation of January during the last six years is significantly less than that of the previous period, a fact that explains the significant reduction of the inflows to the reservoirs of Mornos and Yliki.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/38/2/documents/1993AICSecheresse-ocr.pdf (1102 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4430.1041

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Giakoumakis, S.G., and G. Baloutsos, Investigation of trend in hydrological time series of the Evinos river basin, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 42(1), 81-88, 1997.
    2. Leroux, M., Global Warming: Myth or reality? The actual evolution of the weather, Annales de Geographie, (624), 115-137, 2002.
    3. Leroux, M., Global Warming: Myth or reality? The actual evolution of the weather, Energy and Environment, 14(2-3), 297-322, 2003.
    4. #Leroux, M., Global Warming: Myth Or Reality?: The Erring Ways of Climatology, Springer, 510 pp., 2005.
    5. Sardou, S. F., and A. Bahremand, Hydrological drought analysis using SDI Index in Halilrud basin of Iran, The International Journal of Environmental Resources Research, 1(3), 279-288, 2013.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Tsolakidis, and N. Mamassis, HYDRA-PC, A data base system for regional hydrological data management, Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Advances in Water Resources Technology, Athens, 551–557, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4954.3921, Balkema, Rotterdam, 1991.

    Recent improvements of personal computer capabilities have facilitated the development of computer programs for hydrological data management and processing in order to take maximum advantage of the available hydrological information. In this paper a software package (HYDRA-PC, Hydrological Data Retrieval and Analysis for personal Computers) developed for the processing and analysis of daily and hourly hydrometeorological data is presented. The package is made of a number of executable programs and database files. For every hydrometeorological station, the database includes daily and hourly measurements as well as information on the station's peculiarities, quality and accuracy of measurements for an unlimited time period. HYDRA-PC's main characteristics are the rapid entry, updating, retrieval and primary processing of data as well as efficient computer memory and disk usage with the application of special computer programming techniques. The program operates in Greek language and is designed to accommodate the peculiarities of the data collection network (gross inaccuracies in data collection, river stage - discharge instabilities) often encountered in Greece.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/36/2/documents/1991EWRAHYDRAPC-ocr.pdf (798 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4954.3921

  1. P. Avgerinou , Ε. Chiotis , S. Chrisoulaki, P. Defteraios, T. Evangelou , M. Gigourtakis, G. Kakes, Y. Kourtzellis , P. Koutis, N. Mamassis, M. Pappa, G. Peppas, and A. Strataridaki, Updated Appraisal of Ancient Underground Aqueducts in Greece, Underground Aqueducts Handbook, edited by A. N. Angelakis, Ε. Chiotis , S. Eslamian , and H. Weingartner, doi:10.1201/9781315368566-5, 2016.

  1. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Mitigating flooding in a typical urban area in North Western Attica in Greece, Conference on Changing Cities: Spatial Design, Landscape and Socio-economic Dimensions, Porto Heli, Peloponnese, Greece, June 2015.

    Frequent floods in urban areas can pose threats to human lives and cause extensive devastation with long lasting consequences on properties and the environment. The frequency and impact of urban flooding are intensified by extended urbanization and the consequent land use change. More specifically, the expansion of impermeable areas in urban zones can cause rainfall events of low return period to produce the same or even more intense socioeconomic and environmental impact compared to rainfall events of high return period. For this reason, interventions in urban zones that are expected to deteriorate rainwater drainage conditions need to be accompanied by appropriate measures both structural and non-structural that ensure flood mitigation on the entire hydrological basin. In the absence of such measures which is usually the case, additional approaches to minimize flood impact need to be adopted. Flood effects are also intensified by poor urban design and inequitable development practices leading to greater water volumes that have to be managed in shorter times. A typical urban area that suffers from frequent flooding is the Community of Magoula, a community of 5000 habitats, located 21 km North West of Athens (Greece). The construction of a modern highway (Attiki Odos) that crosses the Community provided adequate flood protection locally, but was not accompanied by appropriate structural and non-structural measures to protect the entire basin. This paper presents an approach to expand insufficient infrastructure in order to provide adequate flood protection to the entire urban area of the Community of Magoula. In particular, the existing drainage pipe network of the area is expanded over a critical net of urbanised zones with low permeability, in order to mitigate flood events. The design of the proposed works was evaluated against both their capacity to successfully drain the flooded areas and the adequacy of the existing infrastructure to accommodate the incoming flow. The paper concludes with a set of complementary BMPs and non-structural measures that aim to ameliorate and mitigate flash flooding effects.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1563/1/documents/P588-Changing_Cities2015_Full_paper.pdf (869 KB)

  1. S. Mihas, K. Nikolaou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of sediment yield with MUSLE and monitoring. A case study for Tsiknias dam at Lesvos Island in Greece, IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals, Thessaloniki, 8 pages, 12 May 2015.

    The purpose of the present study is the estimation of sediment yield of Tsiknias river basin at the location of a dam under study. The Tsiknias reservoir will supply drinking water at Mytilene town and at a large area of Lesvos island in Northern Greece. Moreover, a small amount of the reservoir water is intended to satisfy the demands of the downstream irrigation system at Kalloni plain. The methods used for estimating the volume of sediment yield in this study are empirical by means of modern technologies like GIS models. The main methodology that estimates the sediment yield used at the present study is the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE). In comparison with MUSLE, other methods have also been tested like Gavrilovic [1] and Koutsoyiannis & Tarla equations [3]. The calculation of the sediment yield volume will be finalized by means of the field measurements that are in progress (10/2014 – next hydrological year). This program of measurements includes records of the flow, hydrometeorological data as well as sediment volumes (suspended and bedded sediment). Estimating the sediment transport at the location of the dam will affect not only the inactive storage of the dam, but it will also determine the design of the water abstraction works at the Tsiknias reservoir, as well as the design of structures required for a sustainable sedimentation management.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1558/1/documents/IWA_Thessaloniki_paper.pdf (1266 KB)

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Conference publications and presentations with evaluation of abstract

  1. V. Daniil, G. Pouliasis, E. Zacharopoulou, E. Demetriou, G. Manou, M. Chalakatevaki, I. Parara, C. Georganta, P. Stamou, S. Karali, E. Hadjimitsis, G. Koudouris, E. Moschos, D. Roussis, K. Papoulakos, A. Koskinas, G. Pollakis, N. Gournari, K. Sakellari, Y. Moustakis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, H. Tyralis, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, E. Deligiannis, V. Tsoukala, P. Papanicolaou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The uncertainty of atmospheric processes in planning a hybrid renewable energy system for a non-connected island, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-16781-4, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.29610.62406, European Geosciences Union, 2017.

    Non-connected islands to the electric gird are often depending on oil-fueled power plants with high unit cost. A hybrid energy system with renewable resources such as wind and solar plants could reduce this cost and also offer more environmental friendly solutions. However, atmospheric processes are characterized by high uncertainty that does not permit harvesting and utilizing full of their potential. Therefore, a more sophisticated framework that somehow incorporates this uncertainty could improve the performance of the system. In this context, we describe several stochastic and financial aspects of this framework. Particularly, we investigate the cross-correlation between several atmospheric processes and the energy demand, the possibility of mixing renewable resources with the conventional ones and in what degree of reliability, and critical financial subsystems such as weather derivatives. A pilot application of the above framework is also presented for a remote island in the Aegean Sea.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1689/1/documents/EGU2017oral_16781_final.pdf (3038 KB)

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  1. P. Stamou, S. Karali, M. Chalakatevaki, V. Daniil, K. Tzouka, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, P. Papanicolaou, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Creating the electric energy mix of a non-connected Aegean island, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-10130-10, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.36537.77927, European Geosciences Union, 2017.

    As the electric energy in the non-connected islands is mainly produced by oil-fueled power plants, the unit cost is extremely high. Here the various energy sources are examined in order to create the appropriate electric energy mix for a non-connected Aegean island. All energy sources (renewable and fossil fuels) are examined and each one is evaluated using technical, environmental and economic criteria. Finally the most appropriate energy sources are simulated considering the corresponding energy works. Special emphasis is given to the use of biomass and the possibility of replacing (even partially) the existing oil-fueled power plant. Finally, a synthesis of various energy sources is presented that satisfies the electric energy demand taking into account the base and peak electric loads of the island.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1688/2/documents/posterEGU.pdf (2687 KB)

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  1. G. Koudouris, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of the stochastic nature of solar radiation for renewable resources management, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, EGU2017-10189-4, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16215.06564, European Geosciences Union, 2017.

    A detailed investigation of the variability of solar radiation can be proven useful towards more efficient and sustainable design of renewable resources systems. This variability is mainly caused from the regular seasonal and diurnal variation, as well as its stochastic nature of the atmospheric processes, i.e. sunshine duration. In this context, we analyze numerous observations in Greece (Hellenic National Meteorological Service; http://www.hnms.gr/) and around the globe (NASA SSE - Surface meteorology and Solar Energy; http://www.soda-pro.com/webservices/radiation/nasa-sse) and we investigate the long-term behaviour and double periodicity of the solar radiation process. Also, we apply a parsimonious double-cyclostationary stochastic model to a theoretical scenario of solar energy production for an island in the Aegean Sea.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1686/1/documents/SGU2017_solar_pres.pdf (1812 KB)

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  1. H. Tyralis, N. Mamassis, and Y. Photis, Spatial analysis of electricity demand patterns in Greece: Application of a GIS-based methodological framework, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, European Geosciences Union, 2016.

    We investigate various uses of electricity demand in Greece (agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial use as well as use for public and municipal authorities and street lighting) and we examine their relation with variables such as population, total area, population density and the Gross Domestic Product. The analysis is performed on data which span from 2008 to 2012 and have annual temporal resolution and spatial resolution down to the level of prefecture. We both visualize the results of the analysis and we perform cluster and outlier analysis using the Anselin local Moran's I statistic as well as hot spot analysis using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic. The definition of the spatial patterns and relationships of the aforementioned variables in a GIS environment provides meaningful insight and better understanding of the regional development model in Greece and justifies the basis for an energy demand forecasting methodology.

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  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, The water supply of Athens through the centuries, 16th conference Cura Aquarum, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24516.22400/1, German Water History Association, German Archaeological Institute in Athens, 2015.

    Over its long history, Athens has never had sufficient water resources and the water supply of the city has been an endless and ambitious challenge. Several hydraulic works of various scales and types (from simple wells and cisterns to large aqueducts) have been constructed during this long period. These works helped Athenians to cope with water scarcity. The evolution, through the centuries, of water supply works and water management practices in the city of Athens, is revisited, focusing on the sustainability of ancient works (aqueducts that were in use until the 20th century), and the relationship of the water technology with socio-economical characteristics during history. The management of the contemporary water supply system, one of the most extensive and complex water supply systems in the world, is also studied.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1543/1/documents/2014CuraAquarum3.pdf (5033 KB)

  1. H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, and N. Mamassis, Analysis of the electricity demand of Greece for optimal planning of a large-scale hybrid renewable energy system, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-5643, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    The Greek electricity system is examined for the period 2002-2014. The demand load data are analysed at various time scales (hourly, daily, seasonal and annual) and they are related to the mean daily temperature and the gross domestic product (GDP) of Greece for the same time period. The prediction of energy demand, a product of the Greek Independent Power Transmission Operator, is also compared with the demand load. Interesting results about the change of the electricity demand scheme after the year 2010 are derived. This change is related to the decrease of the GDP, during the period 2010-2014. The results of the analysis will be used in the development of an energy forecasting system which will be a part of a framework for optimal planning of a large-scale hybrid renewable energy system in which hydropower plays the dominant role.

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  1. A. Koukouvinos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, E. Rozos, S.M. Papalexiou, P. Dimitriadis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Integrated water and renewable energy management: the Acheloos-Peneios region case study, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-4912, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    Within the ongoing research project “Combined Renewable Systems for Sustainable Energy Development” (CRESSENDO), we have developed a novel stochastic simulation framework for optimal planning and management of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems, in which hydropower plays the dominant role. The methodology and associated computer tools are tested in two major adjacent river basins in Greece (Acheloos, Peneios) extending over 15 500 km2 (12% of Greek territory). River Acheloos is characterized by very high runoff and holds ~40% of the installed hydropower capacity of Greece. On the other hand, the Thessaly plain drained by Peneios – a key agricultural region for the national economy – usually suffers from water scarcity and systematic environmental degradation. The two basins are interconnected through diversion projects, existing and planned, thus formulating a unique large-scale hydrosystem whose future has been the subject of a great controversy. The study area is viewed as a hypothetically closed, energy-autonomous, system, in order to evaluate the perspectives for sustainable development of its water and energy resources. In this context we seek an efficient configuration of the necessary hydraulic and renewable energy projects through integrated modelling of the water and energy balance. We investigate several scenarios of energy demand for domestic, industrial and agricultural use, assuming that part of the demand is fulfilled via wind and solar energy, while the excess or deficit of energy is regulated through large hydroelectric works that are equipped with pumping storage facilities. The overall goal is to examine under which conditions a fully renewable energy system can be technically and economically viable for such large spatial scale.

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    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440

  1. A. Efstratiadis, I. Tsoukalas, P. Kossieris, G. Karavokiros, A. Christofides, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Computational issues in complex water-energy optimization problems: Time scales, parameterizations, objectives and algorithms, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-5121, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.11015.80802, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    Modelling of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems (HRES) is a challenging task, for which several open computational issues exist. HRES comprise typical components of hydrosystems (reservoirs, boreholes, conveyance networks, hydropower stations, pumps, water demand nodes, etc.), which are dynamically linked with renewables (e.g., wind turbines, solar parks) and energy demand nodes. In such systems, apart from the well-known shortcomings of water resources modelling (nonlinear dynamics, unknown future inflows, large number of variables and constraints, conflicting criteria, etc.), additional complexities and uncertainties arise due to the introduction of energy components and associated fluxes. A major difficulty is the need for coupling two different temporal scales, given that in hydrosystem modeling, monthly simulation steps are typically adopted, yet for a faithful representation of the energy balance (i.e. energy production vs. demand) a much finer resolution (e.g. hourly) is required. Another drawback is the increase of control variables, constraints and objectives, due to the simultaneous modelling of the two parallel fluxes (i.e. water and energy) and their interactions. Finally, since the driving hydrometeorological processes of the integrated system are inherently uncertain, it is often essential to use synthetically generated input time series of large length, in order to assess the system performance in terms of reliability and risk, with satisfactory accuracy. To address these issues, we propose an effective and efficient modeling framework, key objectives of which are: (a) the substantial reduction of control variables, through parsimonious yet consistent parameterizations; (b) the substantial decrease of computational burden of simulation, by linearizing the combined water and energy allocation problem of each individual time step, and solve each local sub-problem through very fast linear network programming algorithms, and (c) the substantial decrease of the required number of function evaluations for detecting the optimal management policy, using an innovative, surrogate-assisted global optimization approach.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.11015.80802

  1. A. Drosou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Lykou, P. Kossieris, I. Tsoukalas, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Assessing and optimising flood control options along the Arachthos river floodplain (Epirus, Greece), European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-9148, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    We present a multi-criteria simulation-optimization framework for the optimal design and setting of flood protection structures along river banks. The methodology is tested in the lower course of the Arachthos River (Epirus, Greece), downstream of the hydroelectric dam of Pournari. The entire study area is very sensitive, particularly because the river crosses the urban area of Arta, which is located just after the dam. Moreover, extended agricultural areas that are crucial for the local economy are prone to floods. In the proposed methodology we investigate two conflicting criteria, i.e. the minimization of flood hazards (due to damages to urban infrastructures, crops, etc.) and the minimization of construction costs of the essential hydraulic structures (e.g. dikes). For the hydraulic simulation we examine two flood routing models, named 1D HEC-RAS and quasi-2D LISFLOOD, whereas the optimization is carried out through the Surrogate-Enhanced Evolutionary Annealing-Simplex (SE-EAS) algorithm that couples the strengths of surrogate modeling with the effectiveness and efficiency of the EAS method.

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  1. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Malamos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Evaluation of a parametric approach for estimating potential evapotranspiration across different climates, IRLA2014 – The Effects of Irrigation and Drainage on Rural and Urban Landscapes, Patras, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14004.24966, 2014.

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is key input in water resources, agricultural and environmental modelling. For many decades, numerous approaches have been proposed for the consistent estimation of PET at several time scales of interest. The most recognized is the Penman-Monteith formula, which is yet difficult to apply in data-scarce areas, since it requires simultaneous observations of four meteorological variables (temperature, sunshine duration, humidity, wind velocity). For this reason, parsimonious models with minimum input data requirements are strongly preferred. Typically, these have been developed and tested for specific hydroclimatic conditions, but when they are applied in different regimes they provide much less reliable (and in some cases misleading) estimates. Therefore, it is essential to develop generic methods that remain parsimonious, in terms of input data and parameterization, yet they also allow for some kind of local adjustment of their parameters, through calibration. In this study we present a recent parametric formula, based on a simplified formulation of the original Penman-Monteith expression, which only requires mean daily or monthly temperature data. The method is evaluated using meteorological records from different areas worldwide, at both the daily and monthly time scales. The outcomes of this extended analysis are very encouraging, as indicated by the substantially high validation scores of the proposed approach across all examined data sets. In general, the parametric model outperforms well-established methods of the everyday practice, since it ensures optimal approximation of PET.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1512/1/documents/2014_IRLA_Parametric.pdf (740 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.14004.24966

  1. G. Karakatsanis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Entropy, pricing and macroeconomics of pumped-storage systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2014, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 16, Vienna, EGU2014-15858-6, European Geosciences Union, 2014.

    We propose a pricing scheme for the enhancement of macroeconomic performance of pumped-storage systems, based on the statistical properties of both geophysical and economic variables. The main argument consists in the need of a context of economic values concerning the hub energy resource; defined as the resource that comprises the reference energy currency for all involved renewable energy sources (RES) and discounts all related uncertainty. In the case of pumped-storage systems the hub resource is the reservoir’s water, as a benchmark for all connected intermittent RES. The uncertainty of all involved natural and economic processes is statistically quantifiable by entropy. It is the relation between the entropies of all involved RES that shapes the macroeconomic state of the integrated pumped-storage system. Consequently, there must be consideration on the entropy of wind, solar and precipitation patterns, as well as on the entropy of economic processes –such as demand preferences on either current energy use or storage for future availability. For pumped-storage macroeconomics, a price on the reservoir’s capacity scarcity should also be imposed in order to shape a pricing field with upper and lower limits for the long-term stability of the pricing range and positive net energy benefits, which is the primary issue of the generalized deployment of pumped-storage technology.

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  1. T. Tsitseli, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Construction of ombrian curves using the Hydrognomon software system, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    Hydrognomon is an application for the analysis of hydrological data and includes several applications for time series processing, such as time step aggregation and regularization, interpolation, regression analysis and infilling of missing values, consistency tests, data filtering, graphical and tabular visualization of time series, etc. Both its source code and the executable program are freely available. The new version of Hydrognomon includes a module for the construction of ombrian (intensity-duration-frequency) curves. It is based on a mathematical framework that expresses ombrian curves with unified relationships giving rain intensity in terms of duration and return period, either for a single gauging station or for a station group over a specified area. In the latter case, it supports either single parameters set or spatially varying parameters. The framework is completed with raw rainfall data processing, data management and storage, graphical user interface, and output data graphs and export facilities.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1393/1/documents/2013Kos_Ombrian.pdf (725 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762

  1. E. C. Moschou, S. C. Batelis, Y. Dimakos, I. Fountoulakis, Y. Markonis, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Spatial and temporal rainfall variability over Greece, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19102.95045, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    The main objective of this study is to determine the major statistical properties of rainfall over Greece and analyse their variability through time. To this end, the following properties of rainfall variability were investigated on time series extracted from Hellenic National Meteorological Service records that date back to 1950: (1) the spatial correlation among the stations and the existence of regions which demonstrate homogeneity; (2) the temporal occurrence of maximum rainfall (the month which the daily maximum occurs) and the ratio of the daily maximum to the annual sum; (3) the spatial distribution of the daily maxima, which are observed in a number of stations simultaneously, as well as the rank correlation in space of annual rainfall; (4) the classification of the empirical distributions of daily maxima. The results of our analysis offer an improved overall picture of rainfall variability over Greece and help us clarify whether some attributes have changed over the last 60 years.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1392/1/documents/Kos_RainVariability_poster.pdf (1640 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.19102.95045

  1. N. Bountas, N. Boboti, E. Feloni, L. Zeikos, Y. Markonis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Temperature variability over Greece: Links between space and time, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17739.80164, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    Temperature is strongly linked to the hydrological cycle in numerous ways and mainly with the evapotranspiration. Our aim here is to examine the possible influence of spatial characteristics on the temperature temporal variability of the monthly absolute maxima/minima and the monthly means over Greece. To achieve this, the temperature records of the Hellenic National Meteorological Service station network, which date back to 1950, are analysed. The analysis involved two steps: the determination of regions with similar climatic properties and the investigation of the possible correlations of temperature in time. Thus, the time series are classified in three groups based on their location (continental, coastal and island) and four types regarding the proximity of the station to a city (at the city centre, near the city border, far away from city border) or to an airport. Each one of the time series is then examined for (a) the influence of the city heat island as Greek cities expanded in time, (b) the effect of the general atmospheric circulation (NAO phase), (c) its correlation to the global temperature record and (d) the implied change on evapotranspiration in the area.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1391/1/documents/Kos_Temperature_poster_.pdf (2010 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.17739.80164

  1. Y. Markonis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of drought characteristics in different temporal and spatial scales: A case study in the Mediterranean region , Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    In 1988-1995 Greece experienced a drought, one of the most extended (both in space and time) and intense since the beginning of hydro-meteorological instrumental measurements. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon in different temporal and spatial scales in order to (a) identify possible links with Mediterranean/global climatic regime and (b) to demonstrate the role of the marginal distribution and the autocorrelation function in estimating the return period of the drought and its impact. Three spatial scales were examined: the local scale (regions of Peloponnese in the southern and Macedonia in the northern part of Greece; ~2x2° each), the national scale (~8x8°) and the Mediterranean scale (~15x45°). In the time domain the monthly, annual and inter-annual time steps were taken, while the time horizon is that of the instrumental record as well as a broader time window obtained by introducing qualitative evidence from paleoclimatic studies. Our findings show both strong temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity, which imply enhanced uncertainty.

  1. G. Karakatsanis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24450.68809, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    The paper examines economic reliability of water resource availability within a stochastic framework. Hoekstra and Mekonnen (2012) provide water use data for agricultural and industrial production. The current work utilizes these findings by coupling hydrological processes with reliability for economic use via a statistical approach of scarcity. Water extracted from the hydrological cycle is never bounded permanently, but only creates temporary scarcity via the competitive use of its limited economically useful attributes (such as its quality). The replenishment rate of freshwater reservoirs is limited and the return of water to its natural path requires energy inputs and time. Hence, what the economy is actually deprived of via the intensification of water use, the diversion of a water resource from its natural hydrological path and the eventual degradation after its use is its immediate availability, which is equivalent to increased uncertainty as the economy reaches closer to its natural water supply reliability limit. Georgescu-Roegen (1986) postulated a connection between increased dispersion and supply uncertainty of a resource to entropy, which in the case of water might be interpreted as increase of the probability of temporal unavailability.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1389/1/documents/Kos_Karakatsanis.pdf (736 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24450.68809

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A stochastic simulation framework for flood engineering, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    Flood engineering is typically tackled as a sequential application of formulas and models, with specific assumptions and parameter values, thus providing fully deterministic outputs. In this procedure, the unique probabilistic concept is the return period of rainfall, which is set a priori, to represent the acceptable risk of all design variables of interest (peak flows, flood hydrographs, flow depths and velocities, inundated areas, etc.). Yet, a more consistent approach would require estimating the risks by integrating the uncertainties of all individual variables. This option can be offered by stochastic simulation, which is the most effective and powerful technique for analysing systems of high complexity and uncertainty. This presupposes to recognize which of the modelling components represent time-varying processes and which ones represent unknown, thus uncertain, parameters. In the proposed framework both should be handled as random variables. The following computational steps are envisaged: (a) generation of synthetic time series of areal rainfall, through multivariate stochastic disaggregation models; (b) generation of random sets of initial soil moisture conditions; (c) run of hydrological and hydraulic simulation models with random sets of parameter values, picked from suitable distributions; (d) statistical analysis of the model outputs and determination of empirical pdfs; and (e) selection of the design value, which corresponds to the acceptable risk. This approach allows for estimating the full probability distribution of the output variables, instead of a unique value, as resulted by the deterministic procedure. In this context, stochastic simulation also offers the means to introduce the missing culture of uncertainty appreciation in flood engineering.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1384/1/documents/KosFloodStochSim.pdf (1860 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201

  1. D. Panagoulia, N. Mamassis, and A. Gkiokas, Deciphering the floodplain inundation maps in Greece, 8th International Conference "Water Resources Management in an Interdisciplinary and Changing Context", Porto, Portugal, 8 pages, European Water Resources Association, 2013.

    Floodplain inundation is caused by heavy rainfall, while its evolution depends mainly on land cover and geomorphologic characteristics of the river basins. The aim of this work is to decipher the similarities and differences of flood inundation maps that have been produced for various areas in Greece in the framework of the European Floods Directive (2007/60/EC). The adopted mapping methodology was accomplished through the use of the HECHMS software, which simulates the hydrologic processes of river basins and determines the design flood hydrographs for given return periods, as well as the HEC-RAS software, which simulates the hydraulics of open channel flow (computation of energy gradients and piezometric heads). Both packages are compatible with ArcGIS, which can be used for further data processing and visualization for cartographical purposes. The outcome of floodplain inundation mapping is anticipated to help in planning and prioritizing environmental and flood protection actions in a pre-disaster stage. The mentioned multi-methodology has been implemented to a great number of flood prone river basins in Greece. Flood maps, which can depict a variety of parameters, such as flood extent, water depths and piezometric heads for various return periods, were deciphered taking into account the specific characteristics of each area. The values of the aforementioned parameters are dependent on the (a) intense rainfall regime of the area (IDF curves), (b) geometrical characteristics of the river channel (cross sections areas, roughness, slope) and (c) geomorphologic, geological and soil characteristics of the flood plain (land cover, land use, elevations, slopes, soil permeability, hydraulic conductivity etc).

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1373/1/documents/paper_pana.pdf (820 KB)

  1. D. Serbis, C. Papathanasiou, and N. Mamassis, Flood mitigation at the downstream areas of a transboundary river, 8th International Conference "Water Resources Management in an Interdisciplinary and Changing Context", Porto, Portugal, 10 pages, European Water Resources Association, 2013.

    Floods in the basin of Ardas river, a transboundary river that crosses Bulgaria and has its outlet in Greece, have often created havoc and caused millions of damage, especially in downstream Greek areas, which also repeatedly receive unregulated flow from upstream dams. More specifically, Ardas River, a tributary of Evros river, flows for 214 km in Bulgaria and for only 39 km in Greece and its catchment stretches for 5 250 km2 (94% of the total area) in Bulgaria and for 350 km2 (6% of the total area) in Greece. Three large dams along the river have been constructed in Bulgaria (Kardzhaly, Studen Kladenets and Ivaylovgrad), the last one, Ivaylovgrad dam, in short distance (approx. 15 km) from the transnational borders. During heavy rain, excessive flow from the Ivaylovgrad dam is often released downstream, in order to relieve the reservoir that is kept at maximum level for energy production reasons. As a result, the downstream areas, also affected by the same heavy rain events, need to regulate large flows, often with inadequate response time and relevant means. The present study presents an approach to estimate flood water levels in the Greek territory, caused by both rain events and releases from the upstream dam. For this purpose the study area was divided into three subbasins and the corresponding flood volumes were calculated using several methodologies. The paper concludes with a series of structural and non-structural measures that are suggested to be taken to confront and mitigate flood effects.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1372/1/documents/paper_ser.pdf (953 KB)

  1. V. Pagana, A. Tegos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Panagopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Alternative methods in floodplain hydraulic simulation - Experiences and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10283-2, European Geosciences Union, 2013.

    Floods can simply be defined as the physical phenomena, during which an initially dry land area is covered by water. Floods are normally caused by extreme weather conditions, while their evolution depends mainly on geomorphologic factors, such as soil stability, vegetation cover, as well as the geometrical characteristics of the river basin. To prevent floods’ consequences, we have to study the hydraulic behavior of all the basins. Here, the study is focused on the upstream part of the Rafina basin, located in the east of Athens (Greece). Particularly, a hydraulic simulation is accomplished via the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi-two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the effects of the floodplain and river roughness coefficients on the flood inundation in conjunction with a modern probabilistic view. Finally, a comparison between the three models is made regarding the simulated maximum water depth and maximum flow velocity.

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Μίχας, Σ. Ν., Κ. Ι. Νικολάου, Σ. Λ. Λαζαρίδου, και Μ. Ν. Πικούνης, Σύγκριση μαθηματικών ομοιωμάτων διόδευσης πλημμυρικού κύματος από υποθετική θραύσης φράγματος Αγιόκαμπου, Πρακτικά 2ου Πανελλήνιου Συνεδρίου Φραγμάτων και Ταμιευτήρων, Αθήνα, Αίγλη Ζαππείου, Ελληνική Επιτροπή Μεγάλων Φραγμάτων, 2013.

  1. A. Oikonomou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Tegos, V. Pagana, P. Panagopoulos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10366, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040, European Geosciences Union, 2013.

    The European Union Floods Directive defines a flood as ‘a covering by water of land not normally covered by water’. Human activities, such as agriculture, urban development, industry and tourism, contribute to an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events. The study of the hydraulic behaviour of a river is important in flood risk management. Here, we investigate the behaviour of three hydraulic models, with different theoretical frameworks, in a real case scenario. The area is located in the Penios river basin, in the plain of Thessaly (Greece). The three models used are the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D which are compared to each other, in terms of simulated maximum water depth as well as maximum flow velocity, and to a real flood event. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how each simulation is affected by the river and floodplain roughness coefficient, in terms of flood inundation.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Μίχας, Σ. Ν., Κ. Ι. Νικολάου, Σ. Λ. Λαζαρίδου, και Μ. Ν. Πικούνης, Σύγκριση μαθηματικών ομοιωμάτων διόδευσης πλημμυρικού κύματος από υποθετική θραύσης φράγματος Αγιόκαμπου, Πρακτικά 2ου Πανελλήνιου Συνεδρίου Φραγμάτων και Ταμιευτήρων, Αθήνα, Αίγλη Ζαππείου, Ελληνική Επιτροπή Μεγάλων Φραγμάτων, 2013.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and S. Lykoudis, Flood design recipes vs. reality: Can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted? – A perspective from Greece, Advanced methods for flood estimation in a variable and changing environment, Volos, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19660.00644, University of Thessaly, 2012.

    As a result of its highly fragmented geomorphology, Greece comprises hundreds of small- and medium-scale steep hydrological basins of usually ephemeral regime. Typically, their drainage area does not exceed few hundreds of km2, while the vast majority of them lacks of measuring infrastructures. For this reason, and despite the great scientific and technological advances in flood hydrology, the everyday engineering practices still follow simplistic rules-of-thumb and semi-empirical approaches, which are feasible and easy to implement in ungauged areas. In general, these “recipes” have been developed many decades ago, based on field data from few experimental catchments abroad. However, none of them has ever been validated against the peculiarities of the hydroclimatic regime and the geomorphological conditions of Greece. This has an obvious impact on the quality and reliability of hydrological studies, and, consequently, the safety and cost of the related flood-protection works. In order to provide a consistent design framework and ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk in ungauged basins (which is key issue of the 2007/60/EU Directive), it is imperative to revise the rather outdated engineering practices, by incorporating methodologies that are adapted to local peculiarities. In particular, the collection of reliable hydrological data is essential for evaluating and verifying the existing “recipes” and updating the design criteria. In this context, we are elaborating a research program titled “Deukalion”, in which we already have developed a fully-equipped monitoring network, extending over four pilot river basins. Preliminary outcomes, based on historical flood data from Cyprus and Greece, indicate that a substantial revision is required within multiple aspects of the flood modeling procedure.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1291/1/documents/FloodRecipesVolosConf2012.pdf (1465 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.19660.00644

  1. M. Mathioudaki, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Investigation of hydrological design practices based on historical flood events in an experimental basin of Greece (Lykorema, Penteli), Advanced methods for flood estimation in a variable and changing environment, Volos, University of Thessaly, 2012.

    Typically, the hydrological design procedure in ungauged basins comprises three computational steps: (a) the formulation of the design storm; (b) the estimation of the “effective” rainfall (direct runoff); and (c) the derivation of the flood hydrograph at the basin outlet. In particular, the most widespread approaches with regard to (b) and (c) are the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method and the unit hydrograph (UH), respectively. The SCS-CN method extracts the effective from the total rainfall through an elementary model that uses two parameters, i.e. the curve number (CN), which determines the potential maximum soil moisture retention of the basin, and the initial abstraction, which is in general assumed as 20% of the later. Next, the effective rainfall is propagated through the UH, which is a linear response function employing the spatiotemporal transformation of the direct runoff across the basin. In the absence of flow data, synthetic UHs are employed, for which various empirical formulas exist, derived from hydrological investigations in experimental basins worldwide. Yet, the suitability of such regionalization approaches is questionable, when aiming to apply them in areas with substantially different hydroclimatic and geomorphological characteristics. This issue certainly involves small-scale Greek basins of ephemeral runoff, which are affected by relatively short yet intense storm events causing flash floods. The objective of our study is the evaluation of the aforementioned methods, on the basis of historical flood data from the experimental basin of Lykorema. The basin is located in Penteli Mountain and covers an area of 15.2 km2. It is equipped with three meteorological stations and two flow gauges, from which we selected 35 rainfall and flood events to analyze. In all events was shown that the use of the SCS-CN method, with typical parameter values, in conjunction with two well-known synthetic UHs (Snyder and British Hydrological Institute) provided unrealistic predictions. The key reasons were the significant overestimation of both the CN value and the initial abstraction rate, as well as the improper representation of the shape of the UHs (particularly their rising branch). In this respect, we attempted to adjust the SCS-CN method, given that the CN is not a constant but a variable that actually depends on the soil moisture conditions, while the initial abstraction ratio is rather minor. In addition, we developed a synthetic parametric UH, described by a linear rising branch and a logarithmic falling branch. This uses as inputs the time of concentration, estimated by the Giandotti formula, and another duration parameter, estimated via calibration. Following a multi-criteria optimization approach, we represented with high accuracy all the important aspects of the flood hydrographs, in terms of runoff volume, magnitude and location of the peak. Although the implementation of the proposed framework in the specific basin was quite satisfactory, there is much more work to be done for establishing consistent design practices and guidelines of general use. An ultimately important step is the development of pilot basins and the collection of reliable flood data, which will allow providing much more accurate models and formulas.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1290/1/documents/MathioudakiVolosConf2012.pdf (1750 KB)

  1. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and D. Nikolopoulos, Using open source software for the supervision and management of the water resources system of Athens, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14, Vienna, 7158, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482, European Geosciences Union, 2012.

    The water supply of Athens, Greece, is implemented through a complex water resource system, extending over an area of around 4 000 km2 and including surface water and groundwater resources. It incorporates four reservoirs, 350 km of main aqueducts, 15 pumping stations, more than 100 boreholes and 5 small hydropower plants. The system is run by the Athens Water Supply and Sewerage Company (EYDAP). Over more than 10 years we have developed, information technology tools such as GIS, database and decision support systems, to assist the management of the system. Among the software components, “Enhydris”, a web application for the visualization and management of geographical and hydrometeorological data, and “Hydrognomon”, a data analysis and processing tool, are now free software. Enhydris is entirely based on free software technologies such as Python, Django, PostgreSQL, and JQuery. We also created http://openmeteo.org/, a web site hosting our free software products as well as a free database system devoted to the dissemination of free data. In particular, “Enhydris” is used for the management of the hydrometeorological stations and the major hydraulic structures (aqueducts, reservoirs, boreholes, etc.), as well as for the retrieval of time series, online graphs etc. For the specific needs of EYDAP, additional GIS functionality was introduced for the display and monitoring of the water supply network. This functionality is also implemented as free software and can be reused in similar projects. Except for “Hydrognomon” and “Enhydris”, we have developed a number of advanced modeling applications, which are also generic-purpose tools that have been used for a long time to provide decision support for the water resource system of Athens. These are “Hydronomeas”, which optimizes the operation of complex water resource systems, based on a stochastic simulation framework, “Castalia”, which implements the generation of synthetic time series, and “Hydrogeios”, which employs conjunctive hydrological and hydrogeological simulation, with emphasis to human-modified river basins. These tools are currently available as executable files that are free for download though the ITIA web site (http://itia.ntua.gr/). Currently, we are working towards releasing their source code as well, through making them free software, after some licensing issues are resolved.

    Full text:

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482

  1. E. Galiouna, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and K. Aristeidou, Investigation of extreme flows in Cyprus: empirical formulas and regionalization approaches for peak flow estimation, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 13, Vienna, 2077, European Geosciences Union, 2011.

    The island of Cyprus has a typical Mediterranean, semi-arid climate, characterized, among others, by relatively short yet intense storm events causing flash floods. Current practices for the design of flood-protection works as well as flood risk assessment are based on regional approaches, which require a number of parameters that derive from the river basin characteristics. The main target of this work is to evaluate the existing empirical formulas for estimating those watershed parameters, emphasizing on the runoff coefficient and the time of concentration, which are typical inputs for most of the aforementioned tools, such as the rational and the unit hydrograph methods. For this purpose, we analyzed a large amount of hydrological and geographical data, provided by the Water Development Department and the Meteorological Service of Cyprus. This includes annual discharge maxima at 130 flow gauges and the corresponding rainfall data, intensity-duration-frequency (ombrian) curves for different regions of the island, and geographical information for 70 river basins (DEM, hydrographic network, land uses, geology and permeability). A preliminary statistical analysis of annual maxima data indicated that the empirical distribution functions of the flood discharges are much sharper than those of the corresponding rainfall depths, which denotes strongly nonlinearity of the rainfall-runoff mechanisms. In addition, we found that the existing peak runoff estimation methods fail to reproduce this kind of nonlinearity, thus leading to severe underestimation of flood risk. To handle this inconsistency it was necessary to revise the erroneous hypothesis that both the runoff coefficient and the time of concentration are constant properties of the basin. In reality, they depend not only to the constant geomorphological characteristics of the basin but also to the rainfall-runoff event itself. However, an analytical estimation of their actual values is impossible, since they are related to complex hydrological and hydraulic processes. For this reason, we examine the simple yet realistic assumption that the two variables are functions not to the event magnitude but to its return period. Using appropriate historical data, we attempt to establish improved empirical relationships for Cyprus, by fitting the simulated peak flow values to the observed ones.

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  1. Y. Markonis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Orbital climate theory and Hurst-Kolmogorov dynamics, 11th International Meeting on Statistical Climatology, Edinburgh, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.31312.30724, International Meetings on Statistical Climatology, University of Edinburgh, 2010.

    Orbital climate theory, based mainly on the work of Milankovitch, is used to explain some features of long-term climate variability, especially those concerning the ice-sheet extent. The paleoclimatic time series, which describe the climate-orbital variability relationship, exhibit Hurst-Kolmogorov dynamics, also known as long-term persistence. This stochastic dynamics provides an appropriate framework to explore the reliability of statistical inferences, based on such time series, about the consistency of suggestions of the modern orbital theory. Our analysis tries to shed light on some doubts raised from the contradictions between the orbital climate theory and paleoclimatic data.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31312.30724

  1. A. Varveris, P. Panagopoulos, K. Triantafillou, A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assessment of environmental flows of Acheloos Delta, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 12, Vienna, 12046, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14849.66404, European Geosciences Union, 2010.

    Acheloos, the river with the highest discharge among rivers of Greece, hosts three hydroelectric dams, while two more dams are under construction. In addition, there are plans for partial diversion of the river to a nearby water district, for irrigation and hydroelectric development. The Acheloos Delta is considered to be one of the most significant Mediterranean wetland habitats for its ecological importance, including fish fauna. In this case study we aim to redefine the ecological flow and propose an outflow management policy from the most downstream reservoir (Stratos), in order to preserve the ecosystem at the Acheloos Delta. A hydrological analysis is employed to reconstruct the natural discharge records along the river on a daily basis, accompanied by a detailed evaluation of alternative methodologies for the estimation of the ecological flow. Based on the results of the analyses, the corresponding water management policy is determined, taking into account the characteristics of the hydropower plan and the related hydraulic works.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.14849.66404

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Fourniotis, N. T., M. Stavropoulou-Gatsi and I. K. Kalavrouziotis, Acheloos River: The timeless, and since ancient period, contribution to the development and environmental upgrading of Western Greece, Proceedings 3rd IWA Specialized Conference on Water & Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, Istanbul-Turkey, 420-428, 2012.
    2. Fourniotis, N. T., A proposal for impact evaluation of the diversion of the Acheloos River on the Acheloos estuary in Western Greece, International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology, 4(4), 1792-1802, 2012.

  1. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrognomon – open source software for the analysis of hydrological data, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 12, Vienna, 12419, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.21350.83527, European Geosciences Union, 2010.

    Hydrognomon is a software tool for the processing of hydrological data. It is an open source application running on standard Microsoft Windows platforms, and it is part of the openmeteo.org framework. Data are imported through standard text files, spreadsheets or by typing. Standard hydrological data processing techniques include time step aggregation and regularization, interpolation, regression analysis and infilling of missing values, consistency tests, data filtering, graphical and tabular visualisation of time series, etc. It supports several time steps, from the finest minute scales up to decades; specific cases of irregular time steps and offsets are also supported. The program also includes common hydrological applications, such as evapotranspiration modelling, stage-discharge analysis, homogeneity tests, areal integration of point data series, processing of hydrometric data, as well as lumped hydrological modelling with automatic calibration facilities. Here the emphasis is given on the statistical module of Hydrognomon, which provides tools for data exploration, fitting of distribution functions, statistical prediction, Monte-Carlo simulation, determination of confidence limits, analysis of extremes, and construction of ombrian (intensity-duration-frequency) curves. Hydrognomon is available for download from http://hydrognomon.org/.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21350.83527

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Sebastianelli, S., M. Giglioni, C. Mineo, and S. Magnald, On the hydrologic-hydraulic revaluation of large dams, International Conference of Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2015 (ICNAAM 2015), 1738, 430003-1–430003-4, doi:10.1063/1.4952216, 2016.
    2. #Mineo, C., S. Sebastianelli, L. Marinucci, and F. Russo, Assessment of the watershed DEM mesh size influence on a large dam design hydrograph, Proceedings of International Numerical and Applied Mathematics (INCANAAM) Conference, 2016.
    3. #Tsitroulis, I., K. Voudouris, A. Vasileiou, C. Mattas, M. Sapountzis, and F. Maris, Flood hazard assessment and delimitation of the likely flood hazard zones of the upper part in Gallikos river basin, Bulletin of the Geological Society of Greece, Vol. L, 995-1005, Proceedings of the 14th International Congress, Thessaloniki, May 2016.

  1. A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Estimation of potential evapotranspiration with minimal data dependence, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2009, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, Vienna, 1937, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27222.86089, European Geosciences Union, 2009.

    We develop a parametric expression which approximates the Penman-Monteith equation thus providing easy estimation of the potential evapotranspiration with minimal data requirements. Namely, the method requires as inputs the mean temperature and the extraterrestrial radiation, from which only the temperature needs to be measured. The model was applied on a monthly step in 37 meteorological stations of Greece for the periods 1968-1983 (calibration period) and 1984-1989 (validation period). The results are satisfactory as the efficiency is greater than 0.97 for all stations and for both calibration and validation periods. Initially, the parametric expression involves three parameters but regional analysis indicates that reduction to one or two parameters is possible and does not increase the error substantially. Using optimization and geographic interpolation through a geographical information system, the parameter values were mapped for the entire territory of Greece, which makes the method directly applicable to any site in the country, the only requirement being that mean temperature data be available.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.27222.86089

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Tabari, H., P. H. Talaee, P. Willems, and C. Martinez, Validation and calibration of solar radiation equations for estimating daily reference evapotranspiration at cool semi-arid and arid locations, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 2014.

  1. G. G. Anagnostopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Credibility of climate predictions revisited, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2009, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, Vienna, 611, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.15898.24009, European Geosciences Union, 2009.

    In a recent study (Koutsoyiannis et al., On the credibility of climate predictions, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 53 (4), 671–684, 2008), the credibility of climate predictions was assessed based on comparisons with long series of observations. Extending this research, which compared the outputs of various climatic models to temperature and precipitation observations from 8 stations around the globe, we test the performance of climate models at over 50 additional stations. Furthermore, we make comparisons at a large sub-continental spatial scale after integrating modelled and observed series.

    Remarks:

    Please visit/cite the peer-reviewed version of this article:

    Anagnostopoulos, G. G., D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (7), 1094–1110, 2010.

    Related works:

    • [85] Prior related presentation
    • [20] Prior related publication
    • [17] A comparison of local and aggregated climate model outputs with observed data

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.15898.24009

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Stockwell, D. R. B., Critique of Drought Models in the Australian Drought Exceptional Circumstances Report (DECR), Energy & Environment, 21 (5), 425-436, 2010.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, and S.M. Papalexiou, Assessment of the reliability of climate predictions based on comparisons with historical time series, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2008, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, Vienna, 09074, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16658.45768, European Geosciences Union, 2008.

    As falsifiability is an essential element of science (Karl Popper), many have disputed the scientific basis of climatic predictions on the grounds that they are not falsifiable or verifiable at present. This critique arises from the argument that we need to wait several decades before we may know how reliable the predictions will be. However, elements of falsifiability already exist, given that many of the climatic model outputs contain time series for past periods. In particular, the models of the IPCC Third Assessment Report have projected future climate starting from 1990; thus, there is an 18-year period for which comparison of model outputs and reality is possible. In practice, the climatic model outputs are downscaled to finer spatial scales, and conclusions are drawn for the evolution of regional climates and hydrological regimes; thus, it is essential to make such comparisons on regional scales and point basis rather than on global or hemispheric scales. In this study, we have retrieved temperature and precipitation records, at least 100-year long, from a number of stations worldwide. We have also retrieved a number of climatic model outputs, extracted the time series for the grid points closest to each examined station, and produced a time series for the station location based on best linear estimation. Finally, to assess the reliability of model predictions, we have compared the historical with the model time series using several statistical indicators including long-term variability, from monthly to overyear (climatic) time scales. Based on these analyses, we discuss the usefulness of climatic model future projections (with emphasis on precipitation) from a hydrological perspective, in relationship to a long-term uncertainty framework.

    Remarks:

    Please visit/cite the peer-reviewed version of this article:

    Koutsoyiannis, D., A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and A. Christofides, On the credibility of climate predictions, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 53 (4), 671-684, 2008.

    Blogs and forums that discussed this article during 2008:

    Blogs with comments about this article during 2008:

    Real Climate 1, Real Climate 2, Prometheus: The Science Policy Weblog 2, Environmental Niche Modeling, Rabett Run, Internet Infidels Discussion Board, Science Forums, BBC News Blogs, Jim Miller on Politics, James' Empty Blog, Green Car Congress, Channel 4 Forums, Deltoid, Washington Post Blogs, Herald Sun Blogs 1, Herald Sun Blogs 2, Herald Sun Blogs 3, AccuWeather, Skeptical Science, Debunkers, Yahoo groups: AlasBabylon, Sciforums, Lughnasa, Jennifer Marohasy 2, Jennifer Marohasy 3, Jennifer Marohasy 4, Bruin Skeptics, Changement Climatique, Klimatika, JFER Forum, The Sydney Morning Herald Blogs: Urban Jungle

    Errata: In slide 3 "regional projections" should read "geographically distributed projections" and the reference of figures to IPCC chapter 11 (Christensen et al., 2007) should change to Chapter 10 (Meehl et al., 2007; also in list of references in slide 20). In slide 11 "Albany, Florida" should read "Albany, Georgia" (thanks to QE in the Small Dead Animals blog who spotted them).

    Related works:

    • [84] Credibility of climate predictions revisited (follow up study)
    • [20] On the credibility of climate predictions

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.16658.45768

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Ekmann, J., and R.C. Dolence, Energy project risk amidst climate change regulatory uncertainty, 25th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, PCC – Proceedings, 2008.
    2. #Taylor, P., Chill, a reassessment of global warming theory: does climate change mean the world is cooling, and if so what should we do about it?, Clairview Books, 404 pp., 2009.
    3. #Howell, B., The Kyoto Premise and the catastrophic failure of rational, logical, and scientific thinking by essentially all scientists, Lies, Damned Lies, and Scientists: the Kyoto Premise example, Chapter A.1, 2011.
    4. Bakker, A. M. R., and B. J. J. M. van den Hurk, Estimation of persistence and trends in geostrophic wind speed for the assessment of wind energy yields in Northwest Europe, Climate Dynamics, 39 (3-4), 767-782, 2012.

  1. N. Zarkadoulas, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and S.M. Papalexiou, Climate, water and health in ancient Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2008, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, Vienna, 12006, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.31757.95207, European Geosciences Union, 2008.

    In contrast to earlier ancient civilizations (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Indus) that flourished in water-abundant environments (large river valleys), ancient Greeks preferred to establish their settlements in dry, water-scarce sites. It seems to be a paradox that all major Greek cities during the several phases of the Greek civilization that lasted for millennia, were established in those areas that had the minimal rainfall across the continental and insular Greece. Although there exist some medium-scale rivers and lakes in Greece, there has been no major city close to them in Greek antiquity. It can be argued that in such choices, climate and health have been the main criteria: dry climates are generally more convenient to live and healthier as they protect the population from water-related diseases. The progress in Greek civilization has been closely connected to hygienic living standards and a comfortable lifestyle. To achieve these, both technological infrastructures and management solutions were developed. In Crete, hygienic technologies were practiced as early as in the Minoan period of the island (3500-1200 BC) and were followed in several other cases in mainland Greece and the Aegean islands. The technological frame created comprised: (a) bathrooms, toilets (resembling modern day ones with flushing devices) and other sanitary facilities; (b) urban wastewater management systems; and (c) underground aqueducts that ensure superior water quality and safety against pollution and sabotage. The importance attached to the hygienic use of water in ancient Greece is highlighted in the case of Athens, a city established in one of the driest places of Greece. The entire Peisistratean aqueduct (6th century BC), which transferred water from the Hymettos Mountain to the city center, was constructed as an underground channel. There were bathrooms, latrines and other sanitary facilities, both public and private. Finally, an extended wastewater management network connected every single building of the Athenian Agora to the so-called Great Drain. The whole infrastructure can only be compared to modern hygienic water systems, reestablished in Europe and North America from the second half of the nineteenth century AD.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31757.95207

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Founda, D., and C. Giannakopoulos, The exceptionally hot summer of 2007 in Athens, Greece—A typical summer in the future climate?, Global and Planetary Change, 67(3-4), 227-236, 2009.
    2. #Parise, M., Underground aqueducts: A first preliminary bibliography around the world, Proceedings 3rd IWA Specialized Conference on Water & Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations, Istanbul, Turkey, 65-72, 2012.
    3. #Antoniou, G. P., G. Lyberatos, E. I. Kanetaki, A. Kaiafa, K. Voudouris and A. N. Angelakis, History of urban wastewater and stormwater sanitation technologies in Hellas, Evolution of Sanitation and Wastewater Technologies through the Centuries, ed. by A.N. Angelakis and J.B. Rose, 99-146, IWA Publishing, London, 2014.

  1. K. Hadjibiros, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and E. Kyritsis, Data base for the Greek nature (FILOTIS), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/877/1/documents/paper_filot.pdf (192 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, C. Papathanasiou, and M. Mimikou, Hydrometeorological measurements network in Athens area (METEONET), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007, (in press).

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/876/1/documents/paper_meteonet.pdf (427 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, K. Noutsopoulos, E. Romas, L. Kaliakatsos, A. Andreadakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The ODYSSEUS project: Developing an advanced software system for the analysis and management of water resource systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 03910, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805, European Geosciences Union, 2006.

    The ODYSSEUS project (from the Greek acronym of its full title "Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System") aims at providing support to decision-makers towards integrated water resource management. The end-product comprises a system of co-operating software applications, suitable to handle a wide spectrum of water resources problems. The key methodological concepts are the holistic modelling approach, through the conjunctive representation of processes regarding water quantity and quality, man-made interventions, the parsimony of both input data requirements and system parameterization, the assessment of uncertainties and risks, and the extended use of optimization both for modelling (within various scales) and derivation of management policies. The core of the system is a relational database, named HYDRIA, for storing hydrosystem information; this includes geographical data, raw and processed time series, characteristics of measuring stations and facilities, and a variety of economic, environmental and water quality issues. The software architecture comprises various modules. HYDROGNOMON supports data retrieval, processing and visualization, and performs a variety of time series analysis tasks. HYDROGEIOS integrates a conjunctive hydrological model within a systems-oriented water management scheme, which estimates the available water resources at characteristic sites of the river basin and at the underlying aquifer. HYDRONOMEAS is the hydrosystem control module and locates optimal operation policies that minimize the risk and cost of decision-making. Additional modules are employed to prepare input data. DIPSOS estimates water needs for various uses (water supply, irrigation, industry, etc.), whereas RYPOS estimates pollutant loads from point and non-point sources, at a river basin scale. A last category comprises post-processing modules, for evaluating the proposed management policies by means of economical efficiency and water quality requirements. The latter include sophisticated models that estimate the space and time variation of specific pollutants within rivers (HERIDANOS) and lakes (LERNE), as well as simplified versions of them to be used within the hydrosystem simulation scheme. An interactive framework enables the exchange of data between the various modules, either off-line (through the database) or on-line, via appropriate design of common information structures. The whole system is in the final phase of its development and parts of it have been already tested in operational applications, by water authorities, organizations and consulting companies.

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    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805

  1. N. Mamassis, Calculation of potential solar radiation from geomorphologic information for snow melting estimation, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

    This paper concerns the improvement of solar radiation estimation at a water basin, considering not only the latitude, but also the specific geomorphologic characteristics of the area. A Geographical Information System (GIS) is used in order to calculate the potential solar radiation to each basin cell, for each hour of a mean year. The solar altitude and azimuth, the aspect and azimuth of all basin cells and the shadow effects due to the geomorphology, are considered for the calculations. The hourly estimations are integrated to daily, monthly and yearly basis in order to compare the potential solar radiation of different basins. Also the procedure can be used for the estimation of the true received radiation considering point measurements of solar radiation. This information is extremely useful in order to understand and predict the snow melting process at mountain basins.

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  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S.M. Papalexiou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrogeios, an integrated model for simulating complex hydrographic networks - A case study to West Thessaly region, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

    An integrated scheme, comprising a conjunctive hydrological model and a systems oriented management model, was developed, based on a semi-distributed approach. Geographical input data include the river network, the sub-basins upstream of each river node and the aquifer dicretization in the form of groundwater cells of arbitrary geometry. Additional layers of distributed geographical information, such as geology, land cover and terrain slope, are used to define the hydrological response units. Various modules are combined to represent the main processes at the water basin such as, soil moisture, groundwater, flood routing and water management models. Model outputs include river discharges, spring flows, groundwater levels and water abstractions. The model can be implemented in daily and monthly basis. A case study to the West Thessaly region performed. The discharges of five hydrometric stations and the water levels of eight boreholes were used simultaneously for model calibration. The implementation of the model to the certain region demonstrated satisfactory agreement between the observed and the simulated data.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881

  1. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrognomon - A hydrological data management and processing software tool, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2005, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, Vienna, 04644, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34222.10561, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

    Hydrognomon is a software tool for the management and analysis of hydrological data. It is built on a standard Windows platform based on client-server architecture; a database server is holding hydrological data whereas several workstations are executing Hydrognomon, sharing common data. Data retrieval, processing and visualisation are supported by a multilingual Graphical User Interface. Data management is based on geographical organisation to entities such as measuring stations, river basins, and reservoirs. Each entity may possess time series, physical properties, calculation parameters, multimedia content, etc. The main part of hydrological data analysis consists of time series processing applications, such as time step aggregation and regularisation, interpolation, regression analysis and filling in of missing values, consistency tests, data filtering, graphical and tabular visualisation of time series, etc. The program supports also specific hydrological applications, including evapotranspiration modelling, stage-discharge analysis, homogeneity tests, water balance methods, etc. The statistical module provides tools for sampling analysis, distribution functions, statistical forecast, Monte-Carlo simulation, analysis of extreme events and construction of intensity-duration-frequency curves. A final module is a lumped hydrological model, with alternative configurations, also supported by automatic calibration facilities. Hydrognomon is operationally used by the largest water organisation as well as technical corporations in Greece.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.34222.10561

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Zarris, D., Analysis of the environmental flow requirement incorporating the effective discharge concept, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics, Athens, 1125–1130, International Association of Hydraulic Research, National Technical University of Athens, 2010.
    2. Puricelli, M., Update and analysis of intensity - duration - frequency curves for Balcarce, Buenos Aires province, Argentina, Revista de Geología Aplicada a la Ingeniería y al Ambiente, 32, 61-70, 2014.
    3. Radevski, I., S. Gorin, O. Dimitrovska, I. Milevski, B. Apostolovska-Toshevska, M. Taleska, and V. Zlatanoski, Estimation of maximum annual discharges by frequency analysis with four probability distributions in case of non-homogeneous time series (Kazani karst spring in Republic of Macedonia), Acta Carsologica, 45(3), 253-262, doi:10.3986/ac.v45i3.1544, 2016.

  1. A. Tsouni, D. Koutsoyiannis, C. Contoes, N. Mamassis, and P. Elias, Application of satellite-based methods for estimating evapotranspiration in Thessalia plain, Greece, EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 5, Nice, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.3221.7840, European Geophysical Society, 2003.

    Estimation of evapotranspiration using both meteorological ground-based measurements and satellite-derived information has been widely studied during the last few decades and various methods have been developed for this purpose. In our application, we estimated the regional daily actual evapotranspiration during the 2001 summer season (June-August) over Thessalia plain in Pinios river basin. It is an area of intensive agricultural activity. Satellite data were accounted for those days that were available. For this case study, two different methods were applied and compared to the conventional and well-known FAO Penman-Monteith method. Satellite data, adequately processed (radiometric calibration, sun illumination conditions correction and geometric correction), were used in conjunction with ground data from the three nearest meteorological stations. The methods, which were properly adapted, exploit surface temperature and surface albedo assessments, obtained respectively from the infrared channels 4-5 and the visible channels 1-2 of NOAA-AVHRR images. The first method requires daily mean surface temperatures, so NOAA-15 satellite images were used, while for the second one the average rate of surface temperature rise during the morning is required, so a combination of NOAA-14 and NOAA-15 satellite images was used. The results of the study are quite encouraging, especially for the first method. In the future we intend to combine the satellite-derived data (Tsurf, Albedo, NDVI) with detailed land-use and land-cover classification map based on high-resolution satellite data.

    Related works:

    • [46] Posterior more complete version.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3221.7840

  1. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A simple water balance model using a geographical information system, 26th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 3, Nice, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.26357.78567, European Geophysical Society, 2001.

    A simple distributed water balance model is presented which simulates the hydrological processes in monthly time step using a geographical information system and its object oriented programming language. Model inputs (precipitation, temperature) and outputs (evapotranspiration, water storage in different conceptual reservoirs, runoff) are given in distributed format in grids with a cell size of 4 square kilometres. Successive transformations of precipitation are done assuming an interconnected system of hypothetical reservoirs representing snow accumulation, soil moisture and groundwater. The model uses only four parameters, namely imperviousness, soil storage capacity and recession coefficients of soil moisture and groundwater. The model is applied to the Acheloos River basin in Western Greece and measured river discharge at a hydrometric station is used for calibration and verification. Despite of its simplicity and parsimony of parameter the model yields a very satisfactory reproduction of measured discharge also providing accumulated runoff in any location of the river network by implementing utilities of a geographical information system.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.26357.78567

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Zeng, W.-H., Q. Sun and Z.-F. Yang, Research on GRID-based dynamic water balance model of Jin River Basin, Journal of Arid Land Resources and Environment, 19 (5), 73-77. 2005.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, The scaling model of storm hyetograph versus typical stochastic rainfall event models, 24th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 1, The Hague, 769, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1192.2165, European Geophysical Society, 1999.

    The scaling model of storm hyetograph (D. Koutsoyiannis and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, A scaling model of storm hyetograph, Water Resources Research, 29(7), 2345-2361, 1993) is fitted to short time scale point rainfall data of several regions. In addition, other typical descriptions of rainfall events with different stochastic structures are examined using the same data sets. The comparison provides evidence that the scaling model fits well to several rainfall data sets of regions with different climates and different population of storms (e.g. intense rainfall events only) and is superior to typical stochastic rainfall event models in capturing rainfall statistical properties even if they are not explicitly used for the model fitting.

    Related works:

    • [25] More complete posterior work.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1192.2165

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Metsovo: The hydrological heart of Greece, Proceedings of the 1st Inter-university Conference for Metsovo, edited by D. Rokos, Metsovo, 209–229, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2928.9205, National Technical University of Athens Press – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1998.

    The area of Metsovo is the place where the five most important river basins of Greece, those of Arachthos, Acheloos, Pinios, Aliakmon, and Aoos rivers adjoin. From this area the Metsovitikos, tributary of Arachthos, rises whereas in a short distance Acheloos, Aoos and some tributaries of Pinios and Aliakmon originate. Thus, metaphorically but with no exaggeration, we could say that the area of Metsovo is the hydrological heart of Greece, where the most important hydrological arteries start. In this study the surface water potential of the area, is appraised. To this aim, appropriate hydrological time series, especially those of rainfall and runoff, are examined using statistical tools. Moreover, the long term variability of time series is statistically tested to trace possible changes of their characteristics in the last forty years. Also the occurrence of extreme events is examined and also related to corresponding phenomena of other regions in Greece.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.2928.9205

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Weather types and geographical distribution of intense rainfall, Abstracts of the 5th International Conference on Precipitation, Elounda, Greece, 1.13, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1290.5208, 1995.

    The spatial rainfall distribution is affected by the type of the prevailing weather situation as well as by local geographical factors, such us orography and latitude. The study of the areal distribution of rainfall is important especially when physiographic and climatological conditions vary over the same region causing different rainfall regimes. In this research, the influence of the prevailing weather type to the geographical distribution of the intense daily rainfall is studied. The study area is the Sterea Hellas region (Central Greece) and consists of three (among the fourteen) different water districts of Greece. The Pindos mountain chain in the west side of this region gives rise to heavy orographic rainfall and causes a wetter rainfall regime as compared with that of the east side. Daily data from 71 rain gages and hourly data from three rain recorders over a 20 year period are used. From these data sets, the intense rainfall events were extracted and analyzed. The intense rainfall days are classified according to the prevailing weather type using a daily calendar of synoptic weather types in Greece. Several methods (also including the available tools of a Geographical Information System) are used for the analysis and comparison of rainfall distributions. The results of these methods are statistically analyzed to trace similarities in geographical distribution of rainfall produced by a specific weather type, and dissimilarities in the distribution of rainfall produced by different weather types. Overall, the analysis shows that different weather types affect the location and other characteristics of rainfall in the study area.

    Remarks:

    Related works:

    • [26] Μεταγενέστερη και πληρέστερη εργασία.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/71/1/documents/1995PrecipConfWeathTyp.pdf (51 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1290.5208

  1. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and I. Nalbantis, Intense rainfall and flood event classification by weather type, 19th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Annales Geophysicae, Vol. 12, Supplement II, Part II, Grenoble, 440, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4124.9520, European Geophysical Society, 1994.

    The influence of different weather types on intense rainfall and flood discharge is studied. Data from Western Greece are analysed, through a weather type classification that has been widely used in Greece. The probability of occurrence of intense rainfall events and flood events, conditional on the prevailing weather type, are calculated. Also, the statistics of the event characteristics are extracted and analysed through statistical tests and analysis of variance. The analyses show that there exist statistically significant differences in the probability of occurrence of an intense rainfall and flood event. However, the weather type concept does not explain significant portion of the variance of the event characteristics, such as rainfall duration, total depth, intensity, and discharge volume.

    Related works:

    • [49] Παρόμοια εργασία αλλά χωρίς αναφορά στα χαρακτηριστικά των πλημμυρικών επεισοδίων.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4124.9520

  1. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, Stochastic rainfall forecasting by conditional simulation using a scaling storm model, 19th General Assembly of the European Geophysical Society, Annales Geophysicae, Vol. 12, Supplement II, Part II, Grenoble, 324, 408, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1241.3682, European Geophysical Society, 1994.

    Based on the recently developed scaling model of storm hyetograph, a conditional simulation scheme is presented, which can be used for stochastic forecasting of the temporal evolution of rainfall. The scaling model is fitted to hourly rainfall data of Greece and Italy. In addition, the model is tested for capturing statistical properties that are not explicitly used for the fitting. The scheme is formulated so as to use any information known for the rainfall event, as a condition for the simulation. The conditional simulation scheme is applied in two steps: first we generate the duration and total depth of the event and then we disaggregate the total depth into sequential hourly depths. Two different types of conditions are examined. The first one concerns the incorporation of preceding hourly rainfall depths. The second is related to information given by meteorological forecasts from which we can approximately estimate the duration and total depth of the event.

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    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1241.3682

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Nalbantis, I., Real-time flood forecasting with the use of inadequate data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 45(2), 269-284, 2000.

  1. N. Mamassis, S. Roti, D. Koutsoyiannis, and Th. Xanthopoulos, Hydrological characteristics of the Mornos, Evinos and Yliki basins, Workshop for the perspectives of resolving the water supply problem of Athens, edited by D. Koutsoyiannis, 55–64, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2177.3043, G. Fountas, 1990.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/79/1/documents/1992EEDYPlekanes.pdf (466 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.2177.3043

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Amanatidis, G. T., A. G. Paliatsos, C. C. Repapis, and J. G. Bartzis, Decreasing precipitation trend in the Marathon area, Greece, International Journal of Climatology, 13(2), 191-201, 1993.

Presentations and publications in workshops

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The quantitative dimension of WFD 2000/60, Water Framework Directive 2000/60 and Inland Water Protection: Research and Perspectives, Athens, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Specific Secreteriat of Water – Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, 2015.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1541/1/documents/2015_WFDQuantity1.pdf (787 KB)

  1. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Varveris, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assesment and implementation of ecological flow constraints in large hydroelectric works: The case of Acheloos, Ecological flow of rivers and the importance of their true assesment, 2014.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1455/1/documents/2014_envflows_pres.pdf (1344 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Perspectives of combined management of water and energy in Thessaly region, , Larissa, 21 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.15760.61442, Technical Chamber of Greece / Department of CW Thessaly, 2014.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1434/1/documents/larissa_25_2.pdf (2206 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.15760.61442

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Exploration of ancient Greek hydraulic tecnhology using web-based data, Hydrotechnologies in Ancient Greece, edited by E. G. Kolokytha, Thessaloniki, 21 pages, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2013.

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  1. A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Peppas, and A. Maheras, Estimating flood flows in ungauged Greek basins under hydroclimatic variability (Deukalion project) - Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Climate and Environmental Change in the Mediterranean Region, Pylos, Navarino Environmental Observatory, 2012.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1292/1/documents/DeflkalionPoster.pdf (258 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Climatic uncertainty and water resources management - from science to divination, 23th general assembly EDEYA, Larisa, Larisa, 2011.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1155/1/documents/deya_2011b_1.pdf (4741 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Strategy for flood prevention: Modern technological framework, Integrated planning of flood protection: A challenge for the future, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27671.78242, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, Athens, 2010.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.27671.78242

  1. N. Mamassis, E. Tiligadas, D. Koutsoyiannis, M. Salahoris, G. Karavokiros, S. Mihas, K. Noutsopoulos, A. Christofides, S. Kozanis, A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, and L. Bensasson, HYDROSCOPE: National Databank for Hydrological, Meteorological and Geographical Information, Towards a rational handling of current water resource problems: Utilizing Data and Informatics for Information, Hilton Hotel, Athens, 2010.

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  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Tegos, Hydrometeorological issues in ancient Greek science and philosophy, The Eco-nomy of Water, edited by E Efthymiopoulos and M. Modinos, Hydra island, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25574.63040, Hellenica Grammata, 2009.

    Technological applications aiming at the exploitation of the natural sources appear in all ancient civilizations. The unique phenomenon in the ancient Greek civilization is that technological needs triggered physical explanations of natural phenomena, thus enabling the foundation of philosophy and science. Among these, the study of hydrometeorological phenomena had a major role. This study begins with the Ionian philosophers in the seventh century BC, continues in classical Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BC, and advances and expands through the entire Greek world up to the end of Hellenistic period. Many of the theories developed by ancient Greeks are erroneous according to modern views. However, many elements in Greek exegeses of hydrometeorological processes, such as evaporation and condensation of vapour, creation of clouds, hail, snow and rainfall, and evolution of hydrological cycle, are impressive even today.

    Related works:

    • [22] English text (publication in Water Science and Technology: Water Supply)

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25574.63040

  1. A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Optimization of the water supply network of Athens, Second International Congress: "Environment - Sustainable Water Resource Management", Athens, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, European Council of Civil Engineers, 2007.

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  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, The Master Plan for the water resource management of Greece (invited talk), International Conference: Integrated Management of Coastal Areas, Faliro, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005, CoPraNet, Mediterranean SOS, 2006.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, and N. Mamassis, ODYSSEUS: Information system for the simulation and management of hydrosystems, 15th meeting of the Greek users of Geographical Information Systems (G.I.S.) ArcInfo - ArcView - ArcIMS, Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14145.15203, Marathon Data Systems, 2005.

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    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.14145.15203

  1. N. Mamassis, and S Politaki, Evolution of water demand in the city of Athens, Water for the city: Strategic planning, demand management and network losses control, National Technical University of Athens, University of the Aegean, Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens, 2000.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/393/1/documents/2000EMPWatConsum.pdf (226 KB)

  1. K Mantoudi, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water balance model of a catchment using geographical information system, 10th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo - ArcView, Marathon Data Systems, 2000.

    Related works:

    • [94] Μεταγενέστερη έκδοση στα αγγλικά.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/86/1/documents/2000GISMantoudi.pdf (5035 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and E. Arapaki, Water shortage in Ethiopia: A first approach, Solidarity for Ethiopia, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.23556.12165, Hellas-Ethiopia, General Consulate of Ethiopia in Greece, 2000.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/85/1/documents/2000Ethiopia.pdf (123 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.23556.12165

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Study of the geographical distribution of hydrometeorological variables using geographical information system, 5th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1995.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/97/1/documents/1995GISHydrometeo.pdf (9985 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, A. Christofides, A. Manetas, A. Sakellariou, R. Mavrodimou, N. Papakostas, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and Th. Xanthopoulos, HYDROSCOPE: Creation of a national data bank of hydrological and meteorological information, Research and Technology Days '95, National Technical University of Athens, 1995.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/94/1/documents/1995EMPhydroscopeXanth.pdf (435 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, Rainfall modelling, Workshop for the presentation of the research project A comprehensive forecasting system for flood risk mitigation and control, Bologna, Italy, University of Bologna, 1994.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/102/1/documents/1994AforismRain.pdf (750 KB)

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, E. Baltas, M. Aftias, M. Mimikou, and Th. Xanthopoulos, Hydrologic characteristics of the water shortage, The water supply problem of Athens, 13–28, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 1994.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/100/1/documents/1994TomeasLeipsydria.pdf (1030 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Schilling, W. and A. Mantoglou, Sustainable water management in an urban context, Drought management planning in water supply systems, E. Cabrera and J. Garcia-Serra (Ed.), Kluwer, 93-215, 1999.

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Some results on rainfall modelling - Univariate versus multivariate stochastic modelling of rainfall, 5th Meeting of AFORISM, Cork, Ireland, University College Cork, 1993.

    Related works:

    • [49] Συναφής στο μέρος που αφορά στην ανάλυση των τύπων καιρού.

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Nalbantis, I., Real-time flood forecasting with the use of inadequate data, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 45(2), 269-284, 2000.

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, An attempt for stochastic forecasting of rainfall, 4th Meeting of AFORISM, Grenoble, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 1993.

    Related works:

    • [99] Εργασία με παρόμοιο περιεχόμενο.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/103/1/documents/1993AforismGrenoble.pdf (1214 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of hydrological characteristics of Mornos, Boeoticos Kephisos and Yliki basins, Water Supply of Athens, Association of Civil Engineers of Greece, Greek Union of Chemical Engineers, Association of the Greek Consulting Companies, 1992.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/110/1/documents/1992SPMELekanes.pdf (884 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Assessment of the risk for inadequacy of the water supply system of Athens in case of persistent drought, Likelihood of persistent drought and water supply of Athens, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.13244.03207, Water Supply and Sewerage Company of Athens, 1992.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/108/1/documents/1992EYDAPDrought.pdf (1874 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.13244.03207

  1. I. Spyrakos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Development of a geographical information system for hydrological data, 1st meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1991.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/113/1/documents/1991GISSpyrakos.pdf (119 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, Hydrological approach of Acheloos-Thessaly hydrosystem, The developmental role of the Acheloos diversion works, Karditsa, 14 March 2010.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/969/1/documents/karditsa_03_10.ppt (2550 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, The hydrological cycle, Conference dedicated to the Universal day of water, Agios Nikolaos, DEYA of Agios Nikolaos, 23 March 2009.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/909/1/documents/par_agnik.pdf (2624 KB)

Various publications

  1. S. Chrisoulaki, and N. Mamassis, Research on water supply of ancient Piraeus. Synthesis of approaches-Further research, 14 pages, 15 May 2015.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1551/1/documents/Pres_synth_5_1_fin.pdf (4454 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, P. Defteraios, N. Zarkadoulas, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Research on water supply of ancient Piraeus-Representation of ancient cisterns operation, 16 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.11392.64000, 15 May 2015.

    Related works:

    • [127]

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1550/1/documents/Pres_cist_5_14_fin.pdf (2543 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.11392.64000

Books

  1. A. N. Angelakis, L. W. Mays, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Evolution of Water Supply Through the Millennia, 560 pages, IWA Publishing, London, 2012.

    Related works:

    • [35] Prolegomena
    • [34] A brief history of urban water management in ancient Greece
    • [33] The evolution of water supply throughout the millennia: A short overview

    Additional material:

    See also: http://books.google.gr/books?id=WxXu83RxSNwC

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Committee on Strategic Research for Integrated Water Resources Management, Delta Waters: Research to Support Integrated Water and Environmental Management in the Lower Mississippi River, Water Science and Technology Board - Division on Earth and Life Studies - National Research Council, The National Academies Press, 2013.
    2. #Gibson, S., Charles Warren's Kidron Valley Tunnels, Bir Ayyub, and the Location of Biblical En Rogel, in: Exploring the Narrative: Jerusalem and Jordan in the Bronze and Iron Ages (ed. by N. Mulder, J. Boertien and E. van der Steen), Bloomsbury, London, 2014.
    3. Freitas, L., M. J. Afonso, N. Devy-Vareta, J. M. Marques, A. Gomes and H. I. Chaminé, Coupling Hydrotoponymy and GIS Cartography: A Case Study of Hydrohistorical Issues in Urban Groundwater Systems, Porto, NW Portugal, Geographical Research, 10.1111/1745-5871.12051, 2014.
    4. Angelakis , A. N., G. De Feo , P. Laureano and A. Zourou, Minoan and Etruscan hydro-technologies, Water, 5, 972-987, 10.3390/w5030972, 2013.
    5. Mays, L. W., Use of cisterns during antiquity in the Mediterranean region for water resources sustainability, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 14 (1), 38-47, 2014.
    6. Chaminé, H.I., M.J. Afonso and L. Freitas, From historical hydrogeological inventory through GIS mapping to problem solving in urban groundwater systems, European Geologist, 38, 31-39, 2014.
    7. Mala-Jetmarova, H., A. Barton and A. Bagirov, A history of Water distribution systems and their optimization, Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 15 (2), 224-235, 2015.
    8. Kumar, P., Hydrocomplexity: Addressing water security and emergent environmental risks, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5827–5838, 10.1002/2015WR017342, 2015.

Educational notes

  1. N. Mamassis, Water control through history, August 2014.

    Presentation in Summer school

    Full text:

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Water Resources Management - Part 2, 97 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2011.

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Hydrometeorology - Part 2, Edition 2, 176 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 2000.

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Lecture notes on Advanced Hydrology - Part 2, 65 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1999.

    Full text:

Academic works

  1. N. Mamassis, Rainfall analysis by weather type, PhD thesis, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 1997.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/470/1/documents/1997mamasis.pdf (16936 KB)

Research reports

  1. D. Dermatas, N. Mamassis, I. Panagiotakis, and A. Efstratiadis, Evaluation of environmental impracts due to water flows through Mavrorachi landfill, Investigation of the qualitative adequacy of the bottom of cell A3 and of the transitional bonding with cell A1 as well as the environmental impacts from the operation of the landfill , Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, March 2017.

    Related project: Investigation of the qualitative adequacy of the bottom of cell A3 and of the transitional bonding with cell A1 as well as the environmental impacts from the operation of the landfill

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, D. Nikolopoulos, H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Case study in the Acheloos-Thessaly system, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 98 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2015.

    This report describes the validation of methodologies and computer tools that have been developed in the context of the research project, in the interconnected river basin system of Acheloos and Peneios. The study area is modelled as a hypothetically closed and autonomous (in terms of energy balance) system, in order to investigate the perspectives of sustainable development at the peripheral scale, merely based on renewable energy.

    Related project: Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1613/1/documents/Report_EE4a.pdf (8010 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, and H. Tyralis, Methodological framework for optimal planning and management of water and renewable energy resources, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 154 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, April 2015.

    We describe a stochastic simulation and optimization framework for hybrid renewable energy systems, based on effective coupling of different models. Initially, we explain the problem of combined management of water and energy resources, we introduce the main concepts and highlight the peculiarities of the problem, by means of methodology and computational implementation. Next is presented the general context, which is based on the combined use of an hourly simulation model for the renewables of a specific study area (wind and solar units), and a daily simulation model for the water resource system and the associated energy components. The models are fed by synthetic time series of hydrological inflows, wind velocity, solar radiation and electricity demand over the study area, for the generation of which are used appropriate stochastic schemes. The theoretical background of all models and related software systems is based on original methodologies or existing approaches that have been improved or generalized in the context of the research project.

    Related project: Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1599/1/documents/Report_EE2.pdf (3766 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Michaelidi, E. Galiouna, K. Tzouka, A. D. Koussis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Description of regional approaches for the estimation of characteristic hydrological quantities, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 146 pages, September 2014.

    The objective of the report is the systematic investigation and evaluation of regional relationships and associated event-based models that are applied in flood studies, through validating their predictions across the pilot basins of the project. The research focuses on the most popular, in Greece as well as globally, hydrological design procedure, which is based on the application of the SCS-CN method for the estimation of hydrological losses, combined with the unit hydrograph theory for the transformation of surface runoff to flood hydrograph at the basin outlet. In the report are investigated both the theoretical-conceptual background of the models as well as the procedure for estimating their basic input quantities (time of concentration, runoff curve number, initial abstraction ratio, initial soil moisture conditions). In this respect, we analyzed more than 100 flood events in 11 sites of interest, which we attempted to represent through several alternative approaches. The analyses showed that it is essential to revise critical aspects of the hydrological design. The most important are: (a) the correction of the time of concentration, as estimated by the Giandotti formula, according to the rainfall intensity; (b) the estimation of parameter CN of the SCS-CN method on the basis of three characteristic layers of spatial information and its adjustment for given initial abstraction ratio; (c) the application of a parametric synthetic unit hydrograph, the time parameters of which depend not only on the characteristics of the basin’s surface but also the mechanisms of the shallow soil; and (d) the statistically consistent estimation of the flood design quantities on the basis of the probabilities of occurrence of the design rainfall under dry, medium or wet antecedent soil moisture conditions.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1495/1/documents/Report_3_3.pdf (28157 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, P. Dimitriadis, and A. Maheras, Litterature review of flood hydrology and related tools, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 115 pages, October 2012.

    The objective of the research report is the literature review of the theoretical framework of flood hydrology, which is branch of engineering hydrology. The research aims to a critical review of the world experience (in terms of methodologies as well as computer tools), and the practices that are employed within flood hydrology studies in Greece. The topics that are examined are: (a) fundamental concepts of flood hydrology are related processes; (b) characteristic hydrological magnitudes of river basins (physiographic properties, runoff coefficient, time of concentrations, curve number, unit hydrograph, time-area curves); (c) probabilistic assessment of extreme hydrological events; (d) methods for estimating design flows; (e) methods for estimating design hydrographs; (f) flood routing models; (g) computer packages; (h) Greek standards and practices.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1215/1/documents/Report_WP3_1_1.pdf (3203 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Final report, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 2, 84 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2011.

    Related project: Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system

  1. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, and N. Mamassis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2009, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 1, 116 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, April 2009.

    Related project: Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and S. Baki, Final report, Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas, Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, November 2008.

    The purpose of the study is the development of a system for the supervision of the protected areas in Kephisos river basin. Using the applications developed, the staff of Kephisos Institution will achieve the real time recording of various activities inside the limits of protection belts. Specifically, three main applications have been developed: (a) A Geographical Information System (GIS) (b) A Global Positioning System Application (GPS) (c) An Internet application

    Related project: Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/898/1/documents/kif_final_report______________.pdf (2372 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Summary report, Athens, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, August 2008.

    The subject and the objectives of the research project are summarized, comprising: (a) collection of hydrological, geographical and water use data and hydrosystem properties; (b) investigation of a proposed legal, financial and social framework for the management of Smokovo reservoir; (c) investigation of the operational framework of other reservoirs; (d) investigation of alternative means for the organization and operation of the Water Management Body; (e) formulation of an operational plan for water resources management; (f) formulation of alternative management scenarios and optimal operation of the reservoir, according various levels of hydrosystem development, and (h) the integration of data and processes to a computer system.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/875/1/documents/report5.pdf (906 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 4, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 2008.

    The subject and the objectives of the research project are presented, comprising: (a) collection of hydrological, geographical and water use data and hydrosystem properties; (b) investigation of a proposed legal, financial and social framework for the management of Smokovo reservoir; (c) investigation of the operational framework of other reservoirs; (d) investigation of alternative means for the organization and operation of the Water Management Body; (e) formulation of an operational plan for water resources management; (f) formulation of alternative management scenarios and optimal operation of the reservoir, according various levels of hydrosystem development, and (h) the integration of data and processes to a computer system.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/840/1/documents/report4_v4.pdf (1766 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Safiolea, E., C. Makropoulos, and M. Mimikou, Benefits and challenges in integrated water resources modeling using OpenMI: the case of the Pinios River basin, Greece, Integrating Water Systems - Proceedings of the 10th International on Computing and Control for the Water Industry, CCWI 2009, Sheffiled, 481-484, 2010.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Alternative scenarios for the management and optimal operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 3, 104 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2008.

    A range of scenarios for the management of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works are studied, taking into account the reservoir inflows, the development of works and the various water uses. In order to estimate inflows, a comprehensive hydrological investigation is carried out, based on the process of pluvial, meteorological, hydrometric and geographical data for the hydrosystem, and the representation of the natural processes using the semi-distributed hydrological model Hydrogeios. The model parameters are calibrated on the basis of historical runoff records in three system locations, which are reproduced with satisfactory accuracy. The resulted inflow sample is used for the generation of synthetic time series upstream of the dam, thorough model Castalia, which are input to the water management model Hydronomeas. Through the latter, various safe release scenarios are investigated for different water uses (irrigation, water supply, hydropower), depending on the works progress, and appropriate management policies are proposed, for short and long term horizon. The analyzes are implemented by means of a computer-based system that was developed for the project purposes, comprising databases and software tools.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/839/1/documents/report3_v4.pdf (2966 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Charizopoulos, N., and A. Psilovikos, Hydrologic processes simulation using the conceptual model Zygos: the example of Xynias drained Lake catchment (central Greece), Environmental Earth Sciences, doi:10.1007/s12665-016-5565-x, 2016.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, D. Mamais, and K. Noutsopoulos, National Programme for the Management and Protection of Water Resources, Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation, 748 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 2008.

    Related project: Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Baltas, E. A., Climatic conditions and availability of water resources in Greece, International Journal of Water Resources Development, 24(4), 635-649, 2008
    2. Gikas, P., and G.Tchobanoglous, Sustainable use of water in the Aegean Islands, Journal of Environmental Management, 90(8), 2601-2611, 2009.
    3. Gikas, P., and A.N.Angelakis, Water resources management in Crete and in the Aegean Islands, with emphasis on the utilization of non-conventional water sources, Desalination, 248 (1-3), 1049-1064, 2009.
    4. Agrafioti, E., and E. Diamadopoulos, A strategic plan for reuse of treated municipal wastewater for crop irrigation on the Island of Crete, Agricultural Water Management, 105,57-64, 2012.
    5. #Zafirakis, D., C. Papapostolou, E. Kondili, and J. K. Kaldellis, Water use in the electricity generation sector: A regional approach evaluation for Greek thermal power plants, Protection and Restoration of the Environment XI, 1459-1468, 2012.
    6. Pisinaras, V., C. Petalas, V. A. Tsihrintzis and G. P. Karatzas, Integrated modeling as a decision-aiding tool for groundwater management in a Mediterranean agricultural watershed, Hydrological Processes, 27 (14), 1973-1987, 2013.
    7. Efstathiou, G.A., C. J. Lolis, N. M. Zoumakis, P. Kassomenos and D. Melas, Characteristics of the atmospheric circulation associated with cold-season heavy rainfall and flooding over a complex terrain region in Greece, Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 115 (1-2), 259-279, 2014.
    8. #Antoniou, G. P., Residential rainwater cisterns in Ithaki, Greece, IWA Regional Symposium on Water, Wastewater & Environment: Traditions & Culture (ed. by I. K. Kalavrouziotis and A. N. Angelakis), Patras, Greece, 675-685, International Water Association & Hellenic Open University, 2014.
    9. Kougioumoutzis, K., S.M. Simaiakis, and A. Tiniakou, Network biogeographical analysis of the central Aegean archipelago, Journal of Biogeography, 41 (10) 848-1858, 2014.
    10. Zafirakis, D., C. Papapostolou, E. Kondili, and J. K. Kaldellis, Evaluation of water‐use needs in the electricity generation sector of Greece, International Journal of Environment and Resource, 3(3), 39-45, 2014.
    11. Manakos, I., K. Chatzopoulos-Vouzoglanis, Z. I. Petrou, L. Filchev and A. Apostolakis, Globalland30 Mapping capacity of land surface water in Thessaly, Greece, Land, 4 (1), 1-18, 2015.
    12. Kallioras, A., and P. Marinos, Water resources assessment and management of karst aquifer systems in Greece, Environmental Earth Sciences, 74(1), 83-100, doi:10.1007/s12665-015-4582-5, 2015.
    13. #Grimpylakos , G., K. Albanakis, and T. S. Karacostas, Watershed size, an alternative or a misguided parameter for river’s waterpower? Implementation in Macedonia, Greece, Perspectives on Atmospheric Sciences, Springer Atmospheric Sciences, 295-301, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-35095-0_41, 2017.

  1. N. Mamassis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Efstratiadis, M. Heidarlis, A. Tegos, A. Koukouvinos, P. Lazaridou, M. Magaliou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of alternative organisations and operations of a Water Management Body for the Smokovo projects, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 2, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2007.

    The framework regarding the establishment and operation of a water management body for the Smokovo reservoir and the related projects is investigated. The study area, as well as the responsibility area within it, is defined, and a short description of the characteristics for the physical and artificial system is made. The current legal and institutional framework is examined, on the basis of which various alternative schemes are proposed for the management body. Its legal and administrative status, the competence and the organogram are specified, and an initial financial analysis is attempted, to validate its viability. Finally, the next actions are proposed, regarding the organization of deliberations with the related organs.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/720/1/documents/Smo_teyx2ekd3.pdf (2847 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and N. Mamassis, Data report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 1, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2006.

    The entire raw data (geographical, hydrological, data for water management, etc.) that was collected for the study area is presented, which involves the operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related projects. The characteristics of the watersheds and the hydraulic structures (Smokovo dam and reservoir, Leontari tunnel and hydropower station, irrigation network) are examined. The water balance of the reservoir is constructed, for its operation period. The water uses (irrigation, water supply, power generation, tourism) are analysed, as well as the water quality parameters and the environmental requirements. Finally, the directions of the future works of the project are specified.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/696/1/documents/DataReport.pdf (2567 KB)

  1. G. Lourmas, and N. Mamassis, Network installation specifications for the measurement of hydrological parameters, Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS), Contractor: NAMA, Report 10, 57 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, June 2005.

    This issue is the output of the Work-package 5 of the research program entitled ODYSSEUS, and it is entitled as "Drafting of technical specifications for the installation of telemetric networks". It is described as basic research and was carried out by the Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering of National Technical University of Athens. The main object of this work-package is to describe the essential methodology which makes straightforward the establishment, as well as the operational use of a meteorological or hydrometric station. This issue emphasizes to the new technologies related to these subjects.

    Related project: Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/668/1/documents/report_10.pdf (1967 KB)

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 25, 135 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2004.

    The subject and the objectives of the integrated system for the modernisation of the supervising and management of the water resource system of Athens is presented along with the developed infrastructure, computational (geographical information system and central database) and measuring, and the organisation, processing and management of the necessary data. In addition, the software tools developed (Castalia, Hydrognomon, Hydronomeas and system for simulation of the hydrological cycle of the Boeoticos Kephisos - Yliki Basin), and the master plans for the management of the water resource system, which were elaborated in the framework of the second phase of the research project using these software tools, are also described. For all subsystems, reference is made to the operational integration of the system as a whole.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/621/1/documents/report25.pdf (3908 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 17, 72 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.

    The hydrometeorological data analysis for the estimation of the areal rainfall, the evaporation and the runoff at specific discharge measurement stations is described. Also, the reservoir water balances are presented, which were established for the estimation of the inflows or leakage losses of the system's reservoirs (Evinos, Mornos, Yliki, Marathonas). Specifically, we present the processing of the monthly rainfall data, the estimation of monthly evaporation from the reservoirs, the calculation of the discharge at the three main watersheds (Evinos, Mornos, Boeticos Kefissos) and the setting up of the monthly water balance components. All raw and processed hydrologic time series are stored in the central database.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/614/1/documents/report17.pdf (1076 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, Monitoring system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 16, 88 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.

    The automatic telemetric network is presented which measures the hydrometeorological variables of the water basins that are linked to the Athens' water supply system (Evinos, Mornos, Yliki and Marathonas basins). Particularly, the available infrastructure and the general specifications for the installation of the new hydrometeorological stations, are described. In addition, the existing conventional hydrometeorological network of EYDAP and the sites of the new automatic telemetrical stations, are presented. Also, the methodology for data administration and processing of raw data, is presented. Finally, remarks from first year of quality control are concentrated and the future works are proposed, in order to improve network's function and reliability.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/613/1/documents/report16.pdf (4196 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, E. Rozos, A. Economou, and G. M. T. Tentes, Methodology and theoretical background, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 15, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.

    The methodology that was developed for the analysis of the water supply system of Athens, even though it was dictated by the special requirements of this particular system, has a broader character and a generalised orientation. In this respect, a series of publications in international scientific journals and communications in scientific conferences and workshops were done, so that the methodology becomes known to the international scientific community and raises its critique. These publications and communications are classified into two categories, with the fist one containing those referring to the core of the water supply system analysis, i.e., to the system optimisation based on the original methodology parameterisation-simulation-optimisation, and the second one containing those dealing with stochastic simulation and prediction of the hydrological inputs to the system. For a clear description and explanation of the methodology, the publications in scientific journals are reproduced in this volume and, for completeness, the summaries of the communications in conferences are included as well.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

  1. N. Mamassis, and et al., Appendix 1: Calculations of basic quantities, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Appendix 1, 58 pages, Athens, January 2003.

    Related project: Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/572/1/documents/appendix_1.pdf (2825 KB)

  1. Ministry of Development, NTUA, Institute of Geological and Mining Research, and Centre for Research and Planning, Master plan for water resource management of the country, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 549 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, January 2003.

    Remarks:

    See the newer version of this report:

    National Programme for Water Resources Management and Preservation

    Related works:

    • [146] Newer version

    Related project: Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece

    Full text:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, Ch. Karopoulos, A. Nassikas, E. Nestoridou, and D. Nikolopoulos, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2002–2003, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 14, 215 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2002.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/552/1/documents/2002eydapmasterplan.pdf (8797 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological Study, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 2, 70 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.

    To protect the Plastiras Lake, a high quality of the natural landscape and a satisfactory water quality must be ensured, the conflicting water uses and demands must be arranged and effective water management practices must be established. This report refers to the hydrological point-of-view of reservoir's operation, which is one of the three components of its management. The analysis is based on the collection and processing of the necessary geographical, hydrological and meteorological data. The main subject of the study is to investigate the safe yield capabilities for several minimum allowable reservoir level scenarios, by applying modern stochastic simulation and optimization methods. The final product is to propose suitable management policies, through which we can ensure the maximization of water supply and irrigation withdrawals for a high reliability level, after imposing the minimum reservoir level restriction.

    Related project: Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/495/1/documents/2002PlastirasHydro.pdf (1120 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Loukas A., N. Mylopoulos, and L. Vasiliades, A modeling system for the evaluation of water resources management strategies in Thessaly, Greece, Water Resources Management, 21(10), 1673-1702, 2007.
    2. #Strosser P., J. Roussard, B. Grandmougin, M. Kossida, I. Kyriazopoulou, J. Berbel, S. Kolberg, J. A. Rodríguez-Díaz, P. Montesinos, J. Joyce, T. Dworak, M. Berglund, and C. Laaser, EU Water saving potential (Part 2 – Case Studies), Berlin, Allemagne, Ecologic – Institute for International and European Environmental Policy, 101 pp., 2007.
    3. #Ευθυμίου, Γ., και Θ. Μπρουζιώτης, Η σημασία των παρόχθιων οικοσυστημάτων για τη διατήρηση της βιοποικιλότητας και της ποιότητας τοπίου – αναπτυξιακές δυνατότητες. Η περίπτωση δημιουργίας μικρών υγροτόπων στα περιθώρια υποβαθμισμένων οικολογικά λιμνών και ποταμών, για την ενίσχυση της βιοποικιλότητας, 2o Αναπτυξιακό Συνέδριο Νομού Καρδίτσας, Αναπτυξιακή Καρδίτσας, 2010.
    4. #Loukas, A., S. Dervisis, and N. Mylopoulos, Analysis and evaluation of a water resources system: Sourpi basin, Greece, Protection and Restoration of the Environment XI, 233-242, 2012.

  1. K. Hadjibiros, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, A. Katsiri, A. Stamou, A. Valassopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, I. Katsiris, M. Kapetanaki, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, K. Noutsopoulos, G.-F. Sargentis, and A. Christofides, Overview report, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 1, 23 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.

    The Plastiras Lake is a reservoir used for irrigation, water supply, hydropower, and tourism. These uses are competitive and result in an especially complex problem of water management. In this report the problem is presented and the main points of the three parts of the project are summarised; these three parts are the hydrological study, the quality study, and the landscape study. The conflicting demands are arranged, and water release scenarios are suggested.

    Related project: Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Andreadakis, A., K. Noutsopoulos, and E. Gavalaki, Assessment of the water quality of Lake Plastira through mathematical modelling for alternative management scenarios, Global Nest: the International Journal, 5(2), pp 99-105, 2003.
    2. #Karalis, S. and A . Chioni, 1-D Hydrodynamic modeling of Greek lakes and reservoirs, Ch. 59 in Environmental Hydraulics, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics (ed. by A. I . Stamou), Athens, Greece, 397–401, 2010.
    3. Kalavrouziotis, I. K., A. Τ. Filintas, P. H. Koukoulakis, and J. N. Hatzopoulos, Application of multicriteria analysis in the management and planning of treated municipal wastewater and sludge reuse in agriculture and land development: the case of Sparti’s wastewater treatment plant, Greece, Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, 20(2), 287-295, 2011.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation of intense rainfall and sediment yield in Thriasio, Assessment of sediment generation in Thriasio, 21 pages, School of Civil Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, 2001.

    Related project: Assessment of sediment generation in Thriasio

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/800/1/documents/Thriasio3.pdf (1411 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Terti, G., P. Galiatsatou and P. Prinos, Effects of climate change on the estimation of intensity-duration-frequency (idf) curves, Proceedings of the 2nd Joint Conference of EYE-EEDYP "Integrated Water Resources Management for Sustainable Development" (Ed.: P. Giannopoulos and A. Dimas), 25-35, Patras, Greece, 2012.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, Ch. Karopoulos, S. Nalpantidou, A. Nassikas, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Xanthakis, and K. Ripis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2001–2002, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 13, Athens, December 2001.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/487/2/documents/report13.pdf (8130 KB)

    Additional material:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Collins, R., P. Kristensen and N. Thyssen, Water Resources Across Europe—Confronting Water Scarcity and Drought, ISSN 1725-9177, 56 pp., European Environment Agency (EEA), Copenhagen, 2009.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Final Report of Phase A, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 12, 63 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.

    The main components of the first phase of the research project are presented. Specifically, the subject and the objectives of the integrated system for the modernisation of the supervising and management of the water resource system of Athens is presented along with the developed infrastructure, computational and measuring, and the organisation, processing and management of the necessary data. In addition, the software tools developed, and the first master plan for the management of the water resource system, which was elaborated in the framework of the research project using these software tools, are also described. Finally, the actions required for the operational integration of the system are summarised.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/418/1/documents/report12.pdf (1117 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 8, 129 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.

    The hydrometeorological data analysis for the estimation of the areal rainfall and evaporation and the runoff for specific discharge measurement stations is described. Also, the reservoir water balances are presented, which were established for the estimation of the reservoir inflows or leakage losses. Specifically, the processing of the monthly rainfall data, the estimation of monthly evaporation from the reservoirs, the calculation of the discharge at a station of Evinos' River Basin and the setting up of the monthly water balance, are presented. Finally, the raw and calculated data are included in the annexes.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/416/1/documents/report8.pdf (1139 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Nalbantis, I., and G. Tsakiris, Assessment of hydrological drought revisited, Water Resources Management, 23, 881-897, 2009.
    2. Nalbantis, I., Evaluation of a hydrological drought index, European Water, 23/24, 67-77, 2008.
    3. Sardou, S. F., and A. Bahremand, Hydrological drought analysis using SDI Index in Halilrud basin of Iran, Environmental Resources Research, 2(1), 47-56, 2014.

  1. N. Mamassis, D. Constantinidis, and J. Gavriilidis, Technical features of the hydrometeorological stations and the telecommunications system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 4, 34 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.

    The technical characteristics of the hydrometeorological measuring stations, as well as those of the telecommunication system are described. Initially, a general description of the system is presented and the technical characteristics of each station category (meteorological, reservoir stage, river stage, river discharge), are reported. In addition, the training of personnel which will operate the stations, the technical specifications of the measurements of river discharge, the technical characteristics of the receiving data system and the maintenance of the systems, are presented. Finally, the characteristics of the proposed sites for the installation of the hydrometeorological stations are synopsised.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/413/1/documents/report4.pdf (446 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, and J. Gavriilidis, Siting of hydrometeorological stations, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 3, 30 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.

    Τhe targets of hydrometeorological measuring stations' network in the water basins which are linked to the Athens' water supply system (Evinos, Mornos, Yliki and Marathonas basins), the available infrastructure and the general specifications for the installation of the new hydrometeorological stations, are described. In addition, the existing hydrometeorological network of EYDAP is described for each water basin and the sites for the new automatic telemetrical stations are presented. Finally, the characteristics of the proposed sites are coded and various data are presented (tables, maps etc.) in order to contribute to better understanding the proposed hydrometeorological network.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/412/1/documents/report3.pdf (524 KB)

  1. G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, N. Damianoglou, K. Constantinidou, S. Nalpantidou, A. Xanthakis, and S Politaki, Analysis of the system requirements, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 1, 74 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2000.

    Within the frame of the project entitled "Updating of the supervision and management of the water supply resources system of Athens" five software systems that are developed are specified. The first one is the Geographical Information System, which aims to model and to supervise the hydrosystem of Athens. The second one is a network of hydrometeorological measuring stations in the catchments, which are linked to the water resource system of Athens are specified. The third system is used for the estimation of inflow and losses of the reservoirs, where the forth one estimates and predicts the water resources in the aquifers of the Viotikos Kifissos and Yliki region. Finally, the fifth system supports the management of water resources. The specifications described are used as a guideline for the development of the above systems.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/410/1/documents/report1.pdf (694 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, A. Xanthakis, S Politaki, and V. Tsoukala, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2000-2001, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 5, 165 pages, Athens, December 2000.

    The master plan for the operation of the Athens water resource system for the hydrological year 2000-20001 deals first with issues on the relations between the different organisations involved in the water supply of Athens, i.e., the Water Supply and Sewage Company of Athens, the Infrastructure Company for Water Supply and Sewage of Athens and a number of ministries. Projections of the water demand and the related water resources availability are studied in the form of future scenarios for which optimised system operating rules are drawn. The scenarios consider the phenomenon of the drought persistence as well as various possible emergency incidents. Operating cost estimates are also given together with elements on the environmental dimensions of the subject. Finally, estimates of the system safe yield and of the energy consumption for pumping water are presented in detail.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/356/1/documents/2000EYDAPMasterplan.pdf (1616 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Getimis, P., K. Bithas and D. Zikos, Key actors, institutional framework and participatory procedures, for the sustainable use of water in Attica-basin, Proc. 7th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, Syros, Greece, 243-252, 2001.
    2. #Minasidou K., D. F. Lekkas, A. D. Nikolaou, and S. K. Golfinopoulos, Water quality changes during storage - the case of Mornos reservoir, Proceedings, Protection and Restoration of the Environment VIII, Mykonos, Greece, 2006.
    3. Stergiouli, M. L., and K. Hadjibiros, The growing water imprint of Athens (Greece) throughout history, Regional Environmental Change, 12(2), 337-345, 2012.

  1. A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Processing of geographical information, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 3, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.

    Related project: Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/185/1/documents/er5_3.pdf (34236 KB)

  1. E. Xanthopoulou, N. Mamassis, P. Anastassopoulou, and K. Alexopoulou, Updating hydrometeorological data, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 1, 240 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.

    Related project: Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia

    Full text:

  1. Team of the YBET96 project, Master plan for the country's water resource management, Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 339 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, November 1996.

    Related works:

    • [155] Newer edition

    Related project: Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems

  1. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Hydrometric data of secondary stations, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report Δ, 228 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.

    Related project: Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Hydrometric data of primary stations, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report B, 118 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.

    Related project: Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/190/1/documents/er8_parb.pdf (6142 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, and E. Xanthopoulou, Daily rainfall data, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report A, 473 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.

    Related project: Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydroscope II - A preliminary application to the Thessaly water district - Final Report, Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, 41 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1996.

    Related project: Hydroscope II - Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/187/1/documents/er8_te.pdf (24563 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, N. Mamassis, and A. Koukouvinos, Surface water resources, Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 16 pages, 1995.

    The hydrologic characteristics of the Sperchios river basin are presented and analysed. To this aim all hydrologic measurements of the Sperchios basin, starting at 1949, as well as measurements at neighbouring hydrologic basins have been collected and compiled. Special emphasis was given to the discharge measurements at the locations Kastri Bridge and Kompotades Bridge, which had remained unprocessed until today. From the records formed, the surface water potential of the Sperchios basin is estimated, which proves to be one of the most important in the water district of the Eastern Sterea Hellas. Furthermore, a trend analysis for the rainfall and runoff series is presented, which indicates the existence of falling trends in both series. Finally, forecasts of the flood discharge at various locations along the Sperchios river for different return periods are provided.

    Related project: Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/381/1/documents/1995SperhiosWatRes.pdf (313 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Maps - Part A: Information of the surface hydrology, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

  1. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Development of a geographical information system- Section A: Surface hydrology information, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 22, 48 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Study of hydrological balances, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 20, 118 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/63/1/documents/er4_20.pdf (11021 KB)

  1. A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological data processing, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 18, 268 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

    Full text:

  1. NTUA Hydroscope Team, HYDROSCOPE, User manual for the database and applications for hydrology and meteorology, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 180 pages, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1994.

    Related project: Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/338/1/documents/er1_1-73.pdf (13830 KB)

  1. G. Kavvadias, S. Tzovaridis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Fitting the Stage-Discharge Curves, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 8/4, 25 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1993.

    Related project: Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/305/1/documents/er1_8-4.pdf (2706 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, and P. Papanicolaou, Selection and calculation of secondary parameters in surface hydrology (More specifically STAGE-DISCHARGE and DISCHARGE-SEDIMENT LOAD relationships), Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 1/4, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 1993.

    Related project: Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/302/1/documents/er1_1-4.pdf (3629 KB)

  1. J. Papageorgiou, G. Sakellaridis, Th. Charantonis, Ch. Pougialis, N. Mamassis, and M. Gini, Design of Codification of Stations, Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information, Report 5/8, 61 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1993.

    Related project: Hydroscope: Creation of a National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/283/1/documents/er1_5-8.pdf (4596 KB)

  1. K. Alexopoulou, P. Anastassopoulou, and N. Mamassis, Case study of the data processing software on the Evinos river basin, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 6, 161 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/7/1/documents/er4_6.pdf (11471 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, K. Nikolaou, G. Tsakalias, and Ch. Anyfanti, Data base and data processing software for monthly hydrologic data, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 5, 96 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/6/1/documents/er4_5.pdf (8547 KB)

  1. N. Stavridis, D Bokou, K. Alexopoulou, P. Anastassopoulou, and N. Mamassis, Rain gauge and hydrometric stations and data, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1, Report 2, 219 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, October 1992.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 1

    Full text:

  1. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Stage data of the Yliki and Paralimni Lakes, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report I, 123 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/178/1/documents/er3_pariota.pdf (16128 KB)

  1. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of the B. Kifisos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report Θ, 167 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/177/1/documents/er3_parthita.pdf (16254 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Stochastic simulation of hydrological variables, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 13, 313 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text:

  1. M. Aftias, C. Tsolakidis, and N. Mamassis, Water consumption of the greater Athens area, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 12, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, June 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/158/1/documents/er3_12.pdf (3513 KB)

  1. S. Roti, N. Mamassis, and C. Tsolakidis, Hydrometeorological data processing of the Yliki basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 11, 167 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text:

  1. S. Roti, and N. Mamassis, Hydrometeorological stations of the Yliki greater area, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2, Report 10, 22 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1990.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 2

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/154/1/documents/er3_10.pdf (1702 KB)

  1. S. Roti, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Study of monthly hydrometeorological data, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report 6, 288 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 1989.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text:

  1. J. Tzeranis, N. Mamassis, and S. Roti, Hydrometeorological Stations, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report 4, 55 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 1989.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/148/1/documents/er3_4.pdf (36549 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of Evinos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report ΣΤ, 231 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, Stage and discharge data of Mornos basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report E, 80 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/172/1/documents/er3_parepsilon.pdf (10098 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, and J. Tzeranis, Discharge measurements & stage-discharge curves of Mornos & Evinos basins, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report Δ, 113 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1988.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/171/1/documents/er3_pardelta.pdf (20981 KB)

  1. Ch. Anyfanti, and N. Mamassis, Raingage data of Evinos Basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report B, 237 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text:

  1. K. Kouridakis, and N. Mamassis, Raingage data of Mornos Basin, Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1, Report A, 262 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 1988.

    Related project: Appraisal of existing potential for improving the water supply of greater Athens - Phase 1

    Full text:

Miscellaneous works

  1. N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Water and energy in 21th century. Views on hydroelectric production, Conference of EYDAP employees union for the world water day, Athens, 21 March 2016.

    Various views of hydroelectricity production are presented

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1605/1/documents/21_3_2016_eydap.pdf (2477 KB)

  1. A. Christofides, and N. Mamassis, Comments on the proposal for a law on the renewable energy sources, 4 pages, 15 January 2010.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/945/1/documents/2010-01-sxolia-nomosxedio-aiolikis.pdf (154 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Evaluating models or evaluating modelling practices? - Interactive comment on HESS Opinions “Crash tests for a standardized evaluation of hydrological models”, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, 6, C1404–C1409, 2009.

    We discuss some drawbacks of the proposed framework for evaluating hydrological models, through both a scientific and an engineering approach. We explain that the model improvement is a continuous process that oscillates between induction and deduction, which requires deep understanding of the physical phenomena and exploitation of all kind of information, taking into account the specific hydrosystem peculiarities. In this context, we ask for more engineering judgment, to prohibit from misleading conclusions due to model misuse issues.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/915/1/documents/hessd-6-C1404-2009.pdf (473 KB)

    See also: http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/6/3669/2009/hessd-6-3669-2009-discussion.html

Engineering reports

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of flood hydrographs at selected streams crossing Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) – Section 1, Detailed design of TAP - Section 1, Commissioner: Asprofos Engineering, Contractors: , September 2016.

    Related project: Detailed design of TAP - Section 1

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S. Baki, Y. Markonis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 205 pages, February 2013.

    Related project: Κατάρτιση Σχεδίων Διαχείρισης των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών των Υδατικών Διαμερισμάτων Δυτικής Μακεδονίας και Κεντρικής Μακεδονίας, σύμφωνα με τις προδιαγραφές της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ, κατ’εφαρμογή του Ν. 3199/2003 και του Π.Δ. 51/2007

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, S. Baki, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 144 pages, February 2013.

    Related project: Κατάρτιση Σχεδίων Διαχείρισης των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών των Υδατικών Διαμερισμάτων Δυτικής Μακεδονίας και Κεντρικής Μακεδονίας, σύμφωνα με τις προδιαγραφές της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ, κατ’εφαρμογή του Ν. 3199/2003 και του Π.Δ. 51/2007

  1. N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Drought and water shortage study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki, 145 pages, June 2012.

    Related project: Κατάρτιση Σχεδίων Διαχείρισης των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών των Υδατικών Διαμερισμάτων Δυτικής Πελοποννήσου, Βόρειας Πελοποννήσου & Ανατολικής Πελοποννήσου σύμφωνα με τις προδιαγραφές της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ κατ’ εφαρμογή του Ν.3199/2003 και του ΠΔ 51/2007

  1. A. Stamou, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Technical Report, Investigation of the hydrographic network development in Mavro Vouno, Grammatiko, Attica, Greece, Commissioner: Perifereiako Tameio Anaptyxis Attikis, Contractors: A. Stamou, D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 40 pages, Athens, 2012.

    Related project: Investigation of the hydrographic network development in Mavro Vouno, Grammatiko, Attica, Greece

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1228/1/documents/2012ReportGrammatiko.pdf (7732 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and P. Dimitriadis, Hydrological study of severe rainfall in the Kephisos basin, Greece, Study of the management of Kephisos , Commissioner: General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, Denco, G. Karavokiris, et al., 154 pages, Athens, 2010.

    Related project: Study of the management of Kephisos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/970/1/documents/2010AthensOmbrian__.pdf (6638 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological study of Arachthos floods, Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta, Commissioner: Municipality of Arta, Contractors: ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers, YDROTEK, V. Mouzos, 272 pages, 2010.

    Related project: Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/950/1/documents/2010Arachthos_floods.pdf (3770 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Essential works to ensure the established ecological flow, Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractor: ECOS Consultants S.A., 22 pages, Athens, May 2009.

    Related project: Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/943/1/documents/ETM_projects.pdf (995 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Investigation of ecological flow, Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractor: ECOS Consultants S.A., 88 pages, Athens, May 2009.

    Related project: Specific Technical Study for the Ecological Flow from the Dam of Stratos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/942/1/documents/ecological_flow.pdf (1567 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of the 12/2005-2/2006 in the region of Lower Acheloos in Aetoloacarnania, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 29 pages, June 2008.

    Related project: Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1162/1/documents/Str_ekt08.pdf (2175 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food, Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co., Athens, 2006.

    Related project: Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας

  1. D. Argyropoulos, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Rozos, Water resource management of Xerias and Yannouzagas basins, Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia, Commissioner: TEMES - Tourist Enterprises of Messinia, Contractor: D. Argyropoulos, 73 pages, Athens, 2005.

    Related project: Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of December 1996 in the region of Lower Acheloos in Aetoloacarnania, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 18 pages, Athens, June 2005.

    Related project: Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/732/1/documents/2005Acheloos_flood_1996.pdf (1602 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of December 2002 in the region of Limne Nesiou, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 13 pages, Athens, February 2005.

    Related project: Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/731/1/documents/2005Edess_flood_2002.pdf (731 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Consultative report for the flood of March 1999 in the region of Limne Nesiou, Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 12 pages, Athens, May 2005.

    Related project: Technical consulting for the floods of Lower Acheloos and Edesseos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/730/1/documents/2005Edess_flood_1999.pdf (697 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation, Diversion of the Soulou Stream for the Development of Lignite Exploitations of the Public Power Corporation in the Mine of Southern Field of Region Kozani-Ptolemais, Commissioner: Public Power Corporation, Contractors: D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, 18 pages, Public Power Corporation, Athens, 2004.

    Related project: Diversion of the Soulou Stream for the Development of Lignite Exploitations of the Public Power Corporation in the Mine of Southern Field of Region Kozani-Ptolemais

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/639/1/documents/2004PPCSoulou.pdf (694 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, M. Lasithiotakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, First monitoring programme for the estimation of water resources in the Pylos-Romanos area for the water supply of the ITDA , Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia, Commissioner: TEMES - Tourist Enterprises of Messinia, Contractor: D. Argyropoulos, 17 pages, Athens, 2003.

    Related project: Water resource management of the Integrated Tourist Development Area in Messenia

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/812/1/documents/2003pylos_measur.pdf (515 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study of the Sperhios basin, Hydrological and hydraulic study for the flood protection of the new railway in the region of Sperhios river, Commissioner: ERGA OSE, Contractor: D. Soteropoulos, Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis, 197 pages, Athens, January 2003.

    Related project: Hydrological and hydraulic study for the flood protection of the new railway in the region of Sperhios river

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/729/1/documents/2003sperxeios_flood_final.pdf (1820 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Tsakiris, G., and V. Bellos, A Numerical model for two-dimensional flood routing in complex terrains, Water Resources Management, 10.1007/s11269-014-0540-3, 2014.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and A. Daniil, Flood study, Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam", Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Aposelemis Joint Venture, Athens, October 2001.

    The objective of the study is the estimation of the design floods of the spillway and the diversion tunnel of the Aposelemis dam. The study is based mainly on regional rainfall and meteorological data. Initially, the data is analysed applying probabilistic techniques as well as the probable maximum precipitation concept, in order to estimate the characteristics of design storms. Next, a unit hydrograph of the catchment is synthesised and using this unit hydrograph and the design storms, the design floods at the dam site are estimated for various return periods. Finally, these floods are routed through the spillway in order to estimate the characteristics of the outflow hydrograph.

    Related project: Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam"

    Full text:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, and L. Lazaridis, Hydrological study of reservoir operation, Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam", Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Aposelemis Joint Venture, Athens, October 2001.

    The scope of the study is the analytic and systematic approach of the Aposelemis reservoir operation, based on probabilistic/stochastic analysis, which aims at complementing the previous studies and giving reliable estimations of the reservoir's safe release. The study gives emphasis to the estimation of the contribution of the surface water resources of Lasithi Plateau basin to the reservoir's water potential, which is affected by the hydraulic communication between the basins of Lasithi Plateau and Aposelemis due to their karstic geologic background. For this purpose, extensive collection and processing of historical hydrological records were required, in addition to the development and calibration of a conceptual hydrological model for both watersheds. The estimation of the safe reservoir release is based on a stochastic model for the generation of synthetic inflow series and a simplified simulation-optimisation model of the hydrosystem composed of Lasithi plateau - Aposelemis reservoir - boreholes - urban and rural consumption. By applying the above models, several safe yield scenarios are examined, referring to alternative values of the physical hydraulic communication between the two basins and different system reliability levels.

    Related project: Engineering consultant for the project "Water supply of Heracleio and Agios Nicolaos from the Aposelemis dam"

    Full text:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Mamassis, Appraisal of the surface water potential and its exploitation in the Acheloos river basin and in Thessaly, Ch. 5 of Study of Hydrosystems, Complementary study of environmental impacts from the diversion of Acheloos to Thessaly, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: Ydroexigiantiki, Collaborators: D. Koutsoyiannis, 2001.

    Related project: Complementary study of environmental impacts from the diversion of Acheloos to Thessaly

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/208/1/documents/2001AcheloosThessaliaReport.pdf (2472 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, D. Zarris, J. Gavriilidis, T. Papathanasiadis, and I. Nalbantis, Flow measurements and estimation of losses from DXX irrigation canal of Lower Acheloos, Estimation of losses from DXX canal in the irrigation network of Lower Acheloos, Commissioner: Division of Land Reclamation Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractor: NAMA, 20 pages, Division of Land Reclamation Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, 1999.

    Related project: Estimation of losses from DXX canal in the irrigation network of Lower Acheloos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/138/1/documents/1999KatoAxeloosDXX.pdf (503 KB)

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigations of the Santorine watersheds, Concerted actions for the sector of environment in Santorine and Therasia islands, Commissioner: Cohesion Fund EU, Contractors: NAMA, SPEED, VLAR, 1998.

    Related project: Concerted actions for the sector of environment in Santorine and Therasia islands

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation - Part B: Investigation of flow duration characteristics, Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Th. Gofas and Partners, Petra Synergatiki, D. Koutsoudakis, Helliniki Meletitiki, G. Kafetzopoulos - D. Benakis - I. Printatko, 100 pages, 1997.

    Related works:

    • [226] Πρώτο μέρος της ίδιας μελέτης.

    Related project: Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/239/1/documents/1997LarisaB.pdf (688 KB)

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation - Part A, Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa, Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Th. Gofas and Partners, Petra Synergatiki, D. Koutsoudakis, Helliniki Meletitiki, G. Kafetzopoulos - D. Benakis - I. Printatko, 148 pages, 1997.

    Related project: Engineering study of the hydraulic project of old and new river bed of Peneios in Larisa

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/157/1/documents/1997LarisaA.pdf (983 KB)

  1. P. Panagopoulos, A. Dakanalis, K. Triantafillou, D. Mertziotis, I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, G. Tsakalias, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Final Report, Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: P. Panagopoulos, General Studies, Istria, Ecosystems Analysis, 1996.

    Related project: Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1474/1/documents/1996Meleti_diaxirisis_Evinou.pdf (39435 KB)

  1. I. Nalbantis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological study, Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: P. Panagopoulos, General Studies, Istria, Ecosystems Analysis, Report number II, Athens, 1996.

    Related project: Water resources management of the Evinos river basin and hydrogeological study of the Evinos karstic system

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/209/1/documents/1996ydrolohiki_meleti_Evinou.pdf (18161 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, and I. Nalbantis, Appraisal of the surface water potential and its exploitation in the Acheloos river basin and in Thessaly, Ch. 5 of Study of Hydrosystems, Integrated study of the environmental impacts from Acheloos diversion, Contractor: Directorate for Acheloos Diversion Works – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Collaborators: Ydroexigiantiki, 150 pages, 1995.

    Related works:

    • [222] Επικαιροποιημένη έκθεση

    Related project: Integrated study of the environmental impacts from Acheloos diversion

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/215/1/documents/KEF5A.pdf (586 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Annex, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 82 pages, 1991.

    Related works:

    • [232] Έκθεση στην οποία αναφέρεται το προσάρτημα.

    Related project: Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/219/1/documents/1991EvinosProsartima.pdf (3463 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Appendices E-F, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 204 pages, 1991.

    Related works:

    • [232] Έκθεση στην οποία αναφέρονται τα παραρτήματα.

    Related project: Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/218/1/documents/1991EvinosParartEST.pdf (5526 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Appendices A-D, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 233 pages, 1991.

    Related works:

    • [232] Έκθεση στην οποία αναφέρονται τα παραρτήματα.

    Related project: Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/217/1/documents/1991EvinosParartAD.pdf (9250 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological investigation - Report, Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River, Commissioner: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage – General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: OTME, Ydroilektriki, YDROTEK, D. Constantinidis, G. Karavokiris, Th. Gofas and Partners, 192 pages, 1991.

    Related project: Engineering study for improving the water supply of Athens with the construction of a dam at the Evinos River

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/216/1/documents/1991EvinosReport.pdf (21561 KB)