Antonios Koukouvinos

Surveying Engineer
A.Koukouvinos@itia.ntua.gr
+30-2107722846

Participation in research projects

Participation as Researcher

  1. DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools
  2. Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system
  3. Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"
  4. Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens
  5. Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas
  6. Flood risk estimation and forecast using hydrological models and probabilistic methods
  7. Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation
  8. Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir
  9. Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)
  10. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece - Phases 1 and 2
  11. Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake
  12. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3
  13. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems

Participation in engineering studies

  1. Consultancy Services for Conceptual Design, Preparation of Bidding Documents, Assistance during the Selection of Contractor & Monitoring/Supervision of Construction, Instalation, Operation & Maintainance for Traffic Control (CTC) for Greater Gaborone City
  2. Έργα Ορεινής Υδρονομίας Ρεμάτων Ορεινών Λεκανών Απορροής Αλμωπίας
  3. Pleriminary study of Almopaios dam
  4. Study of the management of Kephisos
  5. Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta
  6. Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας

Published work

Publications in scientific journals

  1. N. Mamassis, K. Mazi, E. Dimitriou, D. Kalogeras, N. Malamos, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, I. L. Tsirogiannis, I. Papageorgaki, A. Papadopoulos, Y. Panagopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, G. Vitantzakis, N. Kappos, D. Katsanos, B. Psiloglou, E. Rozos, T. Kopania, I. Koletsis, and A. D. Koussis, OpenHi.net: A synergistically built, national-scale infrastructure for monitoring the surface waters of Greece, Water, 13 (19), 2779, doi:10.3390/w13192779, 2021.
  2. G. Papaioannou, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, A. Alamanos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, I. Tsoukalas, and P. Kossieris, A flood inundation modelling approach for urban and rural areas in lake and large-scale river basins, Water, 13 (9), 1264, doi:10.3390/w13091264, 2021.
  3. G. Papaioannou, A. Efstratiadis, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, S.M. Papalexiou, A. Koukouvinos, I. Tsoukalas, and P. Kossieris, An operational method for Floods Directive implementation in ungauged urban areas, Hydrology, 5 (2), 24, doi:10.3390/hydrology5020024, 2018.
  4. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Timing the time of concentration: shedding light on a paradox, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 63 (5), 721–740, doi:10.1080/02626667.2018.1450985, 2018.
  5. E. Savvidou, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Skarlatos, The curve number concept as a driver for delineating hydrological response units, Water, 10 (2), 194, doi:10.3390/w10020194, 2018.
  6. P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, A. Oikonomou, V. Pagana, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping, Journal of Hydrology, 534, 478–492, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.01.020, 2016.
  7. A. Efstratiadis, I. Nalbantis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, HYDROGEIOS: A semi-distributed GIS-based hydrological model for modified river basins, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 12, 989–1006, doi:10.5194/hess-12-989-2008, 2008.
  8. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, A decision support system for the management of the water resource system of Athens, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 28 (14-15), 599–609, doi:10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2, 2003.

Book chapters and fully evaluated conference publications

  1. G. Papaioannou, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, A. Efstratiadis, S.M. Papalexiou, Y. Markonis, and A. Koukouvinos, A methodological approach for flood risk management in urban areas: The Volos city paradigm, 10th World Congress on Water Resources and Environment "Panta Rhei", Athens, European Water Resources Association, 2017.
  2. A. Tsouni, C. Contoes, E. Ieronymidi, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, BEYOND Center of Excellence: flood mapping and modelling, 1st International Geomatics Applications “Geomapplica” Conference, Skiathos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1129.7520, University of Thessaly, 2014.
  3. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, N. Kappos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological network for flood monitoring and modeling, Proceedings of First International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of Environment, Paphos, Cyprus, 8795, 10-1–10-10, doi:10.1117/12.2028621, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2013.
  4. K. Hadjibiros, A. Katsiri, A. Koukouvinos, N. Moutafis, and G. Vilandou, Sustainable management of a large-scale tourist facility with significant water demand, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, A672–A679, Rhodes, 2011.
  5. S. Mihas, K. Nikolaou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of sediment yield with MUSLE and monitoring. A case study for Tsiknias dam at Lesvos Island in Greece, IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals, Thessaloniki, 8 pages, 12 May 2015.

Conference publications and presentations with evaluation of abstract

  1. I. Papageorgaki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, OpenHiGis: A national geographic database for inland waters of Greece based on the INSPIRE Directive Hydrology Theme, EGU General Assembly 2021, online, doi:10.5194/egusphere-egu21-13465, European Geosciences Union, 2021.
  2. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, K. Mazi, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, E. Demetriou, N. Malamos, A. Christofides, and D. Kalogeras, Open Hydrosystem Information Network: Greece’s new research infrastructure for water, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2020, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 22, Vienna, EGU2020-4164, doi:10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-4164, 2020.
  3. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, K. Mazi, E. Dimitriou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Strategic plan for establishing a national-scale hydrometric network in Greece: challenges and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2019, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 21, Vienna, EGU2019-16714, European Geosciences Union, 2019.
  4. C. Ntigkakis, G. Markopoulos-Sarikas, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. D. Koussis, K. Mazi, D. Katsanos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation of the catastrophic flood event in Mandra, Western Attica, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 20, Vienna, EGU2018-17591-1, European Geosciences Union, 2018.
  5. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Velocity-based approach for establishing a varying time of concentration: Α study in three Mediterranean countries, Le Giornate dell’ Idrologia 2017, Favignana, Società Idrologica Italiana, 2017.
  6. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Adaptation of the concept of varying time of concentration within flood modelling: Theoretical and empirical investigations across the Mediterranean, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, 19, EGU2017-10663-1, European Geosciences Union, 2017.
  7. Ο. Daskalou, M. Karanastasi, Y. Markonis, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, GIS-based approach for optimal siting and sizing of renewables considering techno-environmental constraints and the stochastic nature of meteorological inputs, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, EGU2016-12044-1, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19535.48803, European Geosciences Union, 2016.
  8. A. Efstratiadis, S.M. Papalexiou, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, L. Vasiliades, G. Papaioannou, and A. Loukas, Flood risk assessment at the regional scale: Computational challenges and the monster of uncertainty, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, EGU2016-12218, European Geosciences Union, 2016.
  9. E. Rozos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and C. Makropoulos, Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-6528, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  10. A. Koukouvinos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, E. Rozos, S.M. Papalexiou, P. Dimitriadis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Integrated water and renewable energy management: the Acheloos-Peneios region case study, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-4912, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  11. A. Zarkadoulas, K. Mantesi, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, K. Mazi, D. Katsanos, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-3904, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.21920.99842, European Geosciences Union, 2015.
  12. T. Tsitseli, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Construction of ombrian curves using the Hydrognomon software system, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  13. Y. Markonis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of drought characteristics in different temporal and spatial scales: A case study in the Mediterranean region , Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  14. E. Michailidi, T. Mastrotheodoros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Flood modelling in river basins with highly variable runoff, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30847.00167, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  15. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A stochastic simulation framework for flood engineering, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.
  16. V. Pagana, A. Tegos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Panagopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Alternative methods in floodplain hydraulic simulation - Experiences and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10283-2, European Geosciences Union, 2013.
  17. A. Oikonomou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Tegos, V. Pagana, P. Panagopoulos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10366, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040, European Geosciences Union, 2013.
  18. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and D. Nikolopoulos, Using open source software for the supervision and management of the water resources system of Athens, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14, Vienna, 7158, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482, European Geosciences Union, 2012.
  19. A. Christofides, S. Kozanis, G. Karavokiros, and A. Koukouvinos, Enhydris, Filotis & openmeteo.org: Free software for environmental management, FLOSS Conference 2011, Athens, http://conferences.ellak.gr/2011/, 2011.
  20. K. Hadjibiros, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and E. Kyritsis, Data base for the Greek nature (FILOTIS), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007.
  21. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, I. Nalbantis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Control of uncertainty in complex hydrological models via appropriate schematization, parameterization and calibration, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 02181, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28297.65124, European Geosciences Union, 2006.
  22. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, K. Noutsopoulos, E. Romas, L. Kaliakatsos, A. Andreadakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The ODYSSEUS project: Developing an advanced software system for the analysis and management of water resource systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 03910, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805, European Geosciences Union, 2006.
  23. A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S.M. Papalexiou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrogeios, an integrated model for simulating complex hydrographic networks - A case study to West Thessaly region, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881, European Geosciences Union, 2005.
  24. A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, and D. Koutsoyiannis, An integrated model for conjunctive simulation of hydrological processes and water resources management in river basins, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2005, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, Vienna, 03560, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27930.64960, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

Presentations and publications in workshops

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, T. Iliopoulou, S. Antoniadi, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Strategic plan for developing a National Hydrometric Network, Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - Second meeting of project partners, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2019.
  2. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net): Evolution of works, challeneges and perspectives, Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - Second meeting of project partners, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2019.
  3. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - First meeting of project partners, Anavyssos, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, 2018.
  4. Ο. Daskalou, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Methodology for optimal allocation and sizing of renewable energy sources using ArcGIS 10.3: Case study of Thessaly Perfecture, 24th Hellenic Meeting of ArcGIS Users, Crowne Plaza, Athens, Marathon Data Systems, 2016.
  5. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The quantitative dimension of WFD 2000/60, Water Framework Directive 2000/60 and Inland Water Protection: Research and Perspectives, Athens, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Specific Secreteriat of Water – Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, 2015.
  6. A. Koukouvinos, Proposed methodological framework of flood hydrology, Workshop - Deucalion research project, Goulandris National Histroy Museum, 2014.
  7. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Varveris, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assesment and implementation of ecological flow constraints in large hydroelectric works: The case of Acheloos, Ecological flow of rivers and the importance of their true assesment, 2014.
  8. A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Peppas, and A. Maheras, Estimating flood flows in ungauged Greek basins under hydroclimatic variability (Deukalion project) - Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Climate and Environmental Change in the Mediterranean Region, Pylos, Navarino Environmental Observatory, 2012.
  9. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, The Master Plan for the water resource management of Greece (invited talk), International Conference: Integrated Management of Coastal Areas, Faliro, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005, CoPraNet, Mediterranean SOS, 2006.
  10. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Hydrological investigation of the Plastiras lake management, Workshop for the presentation of the research project "Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake", doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16950.09286, Municipality of Karditsa, Karditsa, 2002.
  11. E. Rozos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Supervision and investigation of the boreholes of the Yliki area using geographical information system, 7th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1997.
  12. D. Hadjichristos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Investigation of the design of storm sewer networks using geographical information system, 5th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1995.

Educational notes

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Lecture notes: Geographical Information Systems for Hydrology, School of Pedagogical & Technological Education (ASPAITE), 2017.

Research reports

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Technical report: Development of a national monitoring system for surface water resources, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Τεύχος 2.1, June 2019.
  2. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Technical report: Specification analysis of OpenHi.net system, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 29 pages, Τεύχος 3.1, September 2018.
  3. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, D. Nikolopoulos, H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Case study in the Acheloos-Thessaly system, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 98 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2015.
  4. Y. Markonis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Description of rainfall and meteorological data and processing, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 54 pages, September 2014.
  5. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Michailidi, E. Galiouna, K. Tzouka, A. D. Koussis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Description of regional approaches for the estimation of characteristic hydrological quantities, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 146 pages, September 2014.
  6. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, E. Rozos, and A. D. Koussis, Theoretical documentation of hydrological-hydraulic simulation model, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 108 pages, September 2014.
  7. A. Koukouvinos, Geographical data and procesing, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 36 pages, March 2012.
  8. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Final report, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 2, 84 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2011.
  9. C. Makropoulos, D. Damigos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Benardos, Synoptic report and final conclusions, Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 32 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2010.
  10. C. Makropoulos, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Appraisal of financial cost and proposals for a rational management of the hydrosystem, Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2010.
  11. C. Makropoulos, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Chalkias, Mehodology for estimation of the financial cost , Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 40 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2010.
  12. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Rozos, Hydrogeios - Version 2.0 - User manual, Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information" , Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 100 pages, November 2009.
  13. A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, and A. Koukouvinos, Hydrogeios: Hydrological and hydrogeological simulation model - Documentation report, Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information" , 139 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2009.
  14. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and S. Baki, Final report, Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas, Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, November 2008.
  15. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Summary report, Athens, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, August 2008.
  16. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 4, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 2008.
  17. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Alternative scenarios for the management and optimal operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 3, 104 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2008.
  18. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, D. Mamais, and K. Noutsopoulos, National Programme for the Management and Protection of Water Resources, Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation, 748 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25384.62727, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 2008.
  19. N. Mamassis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Efstratiadis, M. Heidarlis, A. Tegos, A. Koukouvinos, P. Lazaridou, M. Magaliou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of alternative organisations and operations of a Water Management Body for the Smokovo projects, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 2, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2007.
  20. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, A. Tegos, and I. Nalbantis, Theoretical documentation of model for simulating hydrological-hydrogeological processes of river basin "Hydrogeios", Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS), Contractor: NAMA, Report 4a, 103 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2006.
  21. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and N. Mamassis, Data report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 1, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2006.
  22. A. Koukouvinos, Geographical information system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 18, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.
  23. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, E. Rozos, A. Economou, and G. M. T. Tentes, Methodology and theoretical background, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 15, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.
  24. Ministry of Development, NTUA, Institute of Geological and Mining Research, and Centre for Research and Planning, Master plan for water resource management of the country, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 549 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, January 2003.
  25. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, Ch. Karopoulos, A. Nassikas, E. Nestoridou, and D. Nikolopoulos, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2002–2003, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 14, 215 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2002.
  26. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological Study, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 2, 70 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.
  27. K. Hadjibiros, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, A. Katsiri, A. Stamou, A. Valassopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, I. Katsiris, M. Kapetanaki, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, K. Noutsopoulos, G.-F. Sargentis, and A. Christofides, Overview report, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 1, 23 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.
  28. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, Ch. Karopoulos, S. Nalpantidou, A. Nassikas, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Xanthakis, and K. Ripis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2001–2002, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 13, Athens, December 2001.
  29. A. Koukouvinos, Design and implementation of the geographical database, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 7, 29 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.
  30. G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, N. Damianoglou, K. Constantinidou, S. Nalpantidou, A. Xanthakis, and S Politaki, Analysis of the system requirements, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 1, 74 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2000.
  31. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, A. Xanthakis, S Politaki, and V. Tsoukala, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2000-2001, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 5, 165 pages, Athens, December 2000.
  32. A. Koukouvinos, and E. Rozos, Final Report, Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia, 77 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 1999.
  33. A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, Development of a geographic information system for hydrology, water use and related works, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3, Report 38, 50 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 1999.
  34. A. Koukouvinos, and E. Rozos, Progress Report, Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia, 28 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1998.
  35. A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Processing of geographical information, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 3, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.
  36. Team of the YBET96 project, Master plan for the country's water resource management, Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 339 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, November 1996.
  37. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, N. Mamassis, and A. Koukouvinos, Surface water resources, Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 16 pages, 1995.
  38. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Maps - Part A: Information of the surface hydrology, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.
  39. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Development of a geographical information system- Section A: Surface hydrology information, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 22, 48 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

Miscellaneous works

  1. E. Savvidou, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Skarlatos, A curve number approach to formulate hydrological response units within distributed hydrological modelling, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, doi:10.5194/hess-2016-627, 2016.
  2. S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Presentation of "Filotis", an Information System for the natural environment of Greece, Athens, April 2011.

Engineering reports

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of flood hydrographs at selected streams crossing Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) – Section 1, Detailed design of TAP - Section 1, Commissioner: Asprofos Engineering, Contractors: , September 2016.
  2. A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Gaborone storm study, Consultancy Services for Conceptual Design, Preparation of Bidding Documents, Assistance during the Selection of Contractor & Monitoring/Supervision of Construction, Instalation, Operation & Maintainance for Traffic Control (CTC) for Greater Gaborone City, Contractor: Erasmos Consulting Engineering, 7 pages, July 2015.
  3. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Technical report: Investigation of flood flows in the river basin of Almopaios, Pleriminary study of Almopaios dam, Commissioner: Roikos Consulting Engeineers S.A., Contractors: , 43 pages, July 2014.
  4. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S. Baki, Y. Markonis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 205 pages, February 2013.
  5. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, S. Baki, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 144 pages, February 2013.
  6. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and P. Dimitriadis, Hydrological study of severe rainfall in the Kephisos basin, Greece, Study of the management of Kephisos , Commissioner: General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, Denco, G. Karavokiris, et al., 154 pages, Athens, 2010.
  7. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological study of Arachthos floods, Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta, Commissioner: Municipality of Arta, Contractors: ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers, YDROTEK, V. Mouzos, 272 pages, 2010.
  8. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food, Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co., Athens, 2006.

Details on research projects

Participation as Researcher

  1. DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Duration: March 2011–March 2014

    Budget: €145 000

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Research and Technology

    Contractors:

    1. ETME: Peppas & Collaborators
    2. Grafeio Mahera
    3. Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering
    4. National Observatory of Athens

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    Programme: ΕΣΠΑ "Συνεργασία"

    The project aims to develop a set of physically-based methodologies associated with modelling and forecasting of extreme rainfall events and the subsequent flood events, and adapted to the peculiarities of the hydroclimatic and geomorphological conditions of Greece. It includes the implementation of a set of research river basins that comprises a number of gauged basins in Greece and Cyprus with reliable measurements of adequate length, as well as three new experimental basins (with their sub-basins), which will be equipped with the necessary infrastructure. From the field data analysis (hydrological, meteorological, geographical) physically-established regional models will be devoloped for the estimation of characteristic hydrological design quantities, along with hydrological-hydraulic models, which will be integrated within an operational system for hydrometeorological forecasting. A framework of design criteria and methodologies (in a draft form for discussion) will be prepared for the elaboration of hydrological studies for flood-prevention works.

    Project web-page: http://deucalionproject.gr/

  1. Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system

    Duration: October 2008–November 2011

    Budget: €72 000

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    This research project includes the maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System that developed by NTUA for EYDAP in the framework of the research project “Updating of the supervision and management of the water resources’ system for the water supply of the Athens’ metropolitan area”. The project is consisted of the following parts: (a) Upgrading of the Data Base, (b)Upgrading and extension of hydrometeorological network, (c) upgrading of the hydrometeorological data process software, (d) upgrading and extension of the Hydronomeas software, (e) hydrological data analysis and (f) support to the preparation of the annual master plans

  1. Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"

    Duration: December 2009–May 2011

    Budget: €140 000

    Commissioned by: Hydroscope Systems Consortium

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    The Ministry of Environment, Physical Planning & Public Works assigned to a consortium of consultancy companies the Project "Development of a new software platform for the management and operation of the National Databank for Hydrologic and Meteorological Information - 3rd Phase within a GIS environment and relevant dissemination actions". In the framework of the specific project a research team of NTUA undertakes a part as subcontractor. NTUA delivers methodologies for further development of the databases and applications of the Databank and their migration into a web platform (including the experimental node openmeteo.org for free data storage for the public). Specifically, using the knowhow that has been developed in the past by Research Teams from the Department of Water Resources of the School of Civil Engineering a database system and software applications (included hydrological models) are created fully adapted for operation over the Internet. NTUA's contribution is primarily on the design of the new system and the hydrological and geographical database the development of distibuted hydological models, the adaptation of the system to the WFD 2000/60/EC and on supporting dissemination activities. Finally NTUA will participate in the technical support and pilot operation of the project after its delivery from the consortium to the Ministry.

    More information is available at http://www.hydroscope.gr/.

  1. Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens

    Duration: June 2010–December 2010

    Budget: €110 000

    Commissioned by: Fixed Assets Company EYDAP

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: C. Makropoulos

  1. Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas

    Duration: April 2008–March 2009

    Budget: €30 000

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: N. Mamassis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    The main purpose of the system is the supervision of the protected areas in Kephisos river basin. Using the applications that will be developed, the staff of Kephisos Institution will achieve the real time recording of various activities that are built up inside the limits of protection belts. Specifically, three main applications will be developed: (a) A Geographical Information System (GIS) (b) An General Positioning System Application (GPS) (c) An Internet application

  1. Flood risk estimation and forecast using hydrological models and probabilistic methods

    Duration: February 2007–August 2008

    Budget: €15 000

    Commissioned by: National Technical University of Athens

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Collaborators: Hydrologic Research Center

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: S.M. Papalexiou

    Programme: Πρόγραμμα Βασικής Έρευνας ΕΜΠ "Κωνσταντίνος Καραθεοδωρή"

    The objective of this project is the development of an integrated framework for the estimation and forecast of flood risk using stochastic, hydrological and hydraulics methods. The study area is the Boeticos Kephisos river basin. The project includes analysis of severe storm episodes in the basin, the understanding of mechanisms of flood generation in this karstic basin and the estimation of flood risk in characteristic sites of the hydrosystem.

  1. Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation

    Duration: February 2007–May 2007

    Budget: €45 000

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: A. Andreadakis

    This project updates and expands a previous research project (Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece), which has been commissioned by the Ministry of Development and conducted by the same team of NTUA in co-operation with the Ministry of Development, IGME, and KEPE.

    The project includes defining the methodology, analyzing the water resources in the 14 water districts, quantity and quality and the relations between them, describing the existing administrative and development frameworks for water resources management and protection presenting the national, peripheral and sectoral water-related policies, and proposing an approach to a water resource management and protection programme (conclusions, problems, solutions, and proposals for projects and measures).

  1. Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Duration: November 2005–December 2006

    Budget: €60 000

    Commissioned by: Special Directorate for the Management of Corporate Programs of Thessaly

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: N. Mamassis

    Programme: Επιχειρησιακά Σχέδια Διαχείρισης Δικτύων Σμοκόβου

  1. Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)

    Duration: July 2003–June 2006

    Budget: €779 656

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Research and Technology

    Contractor: NAMA

    Collaborators:

    1. Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering
    2. Municipal Company of Water Supply and Sewerage of Karditsa
    3. Aeiforiki Dodekanisou
    4. Marathon Data Systems

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: A. Andreadakis

    Programme: ΕΠΑΝ, Φυσικό Περιβάλλον και Βιώσιμη Ανάπτυξη

    The project aims at providing support to decision-making processes within the direction of integrated management of water resource systems at a variety of scales. Several methodologies and computing tools are developed, which are incorporated into an integrated information system. The main deliverable is an operational software package of general use, which is evaluated and tested on two pilot case studies, concerning hydrosystems in Greece with varying characteristics (Karditsa, Dodecanesus). The end-product of the project is a software system for simulation and optimisation of hydrosystem operation, as well as a series of separate software applications for solving specific problems, aiming at producing input data to the central system or post-processing of the results. The project includes eleven work packages, eight for basic research, two for industrial research and one for the pilot applications.

  1. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece - Phases 1 and 2

    Duration: February 1996–April 2003

    Budget: €216 000

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigators: A. Andreadakis, D. Mamais

    The scope of the project is the classification of the existing information related to water quantity and quality in the water districts of Greece, using geographical information systems. The project part related to water quantity aims at the development of a methodology for establishing a water balance between supply and demand and extracting the most important summary characteristics that are then entered into a geographical information system. The methodology is applied at a water district scale, using information based on existing studies. The project part related to water quality aims at the characterisation of the rivers, lakes and aquifers based on the water quality characteristics, and the water uses and requirements. The characterisation is based on the classification of critical quantity parameters that have been measured and includes the use of a geographical information system. The project was elaborated in two phases. The first phase was implemented in 1996, and its objective was the development of methodologies, the analysis of the 10 water districts and their relationships and the creation of maps. In collaboration with other authorities (Ministry of Development, Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploitation, Centre for Research and Planning), the institutional and administrative status, the international environment and the water policies, were investigated. Finally a first approach towards the integrated management of the water resources of the country was attempted. The second phase was implemented in 2002-2003, and aims at the completion of the study, by incorporating the 4 remaining water districts, a more analytical approach regarding the water management at a country scale and the update of results of the first phase.

  1. Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Duration: May 2001–January 2002

    Commissioned by:

    1. Prefectural Government of Karditsa
    2. Municipality of Karditsa

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: K. Hadjibiros

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    To protect the Plastiras Lake, a high quality of the natural landscape and a satisfactory water quality must be ensured, the conflicting water uses and demands must be arranged and effective water management practices must be established. To this aim, the hydrology of the catchment is investigated, the geographical, meteorological and water power data are collected and processed, the water balance is studied and a stochastic model is constructed to support the study of alternative management scenarios. In addition, an analysis of the natural landscape is performed and the negative influences (e.g. dead tries) are determined and quantified using GIS. Furthermore, the water quality parameters are evaluated, the water quality state is assessed, the quantitative targets are determined, the pollution sources are identified and measures for the reduction of pollution are studied using a hydrodynamic model with emphasis on the nutrient status. Based on the results of these analyses, scenarios of safe water release are suggested.

  1. Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3

    Duration: November 1996–December 2000

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water Supply and Sewage

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: D. Koutsoyiannis

    The main objectives of the research project are the evaluation and management of the water resources, both surface and subsurface, of the Sterea Hellas region, and the systematic study of all parameters related to the rational development and management of the water resources of this region. Another objective of the project, considered as an infrastructure work, is the development of software for the hydrological, hydrogeological and operational simulation of the combined catchments of the study area. The development of the software and, at the same time, the development of methodologies suitable for the Greek conditions will assist in decision-making concerning the water resources management of Sterea Hellas and of other Greek regions. The project also aims at the improving of the cooperation between the National Technical University of Athens and the Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works. This is considered as a necessary condition for the continuous updating of the project results as well as for the rational analysis of the water resource problems of the Sterea Hellas region. The specific themes of Phase 3 are: (a) the completion of the information systems of the previous phases, which concerned hydrological and hydrogeological information, by including two additional levels of information related to the water uses and the water resources development works; (b) the development of methodologies for optimising the hydrosystems operation and the construction of integrated simulation and optimisation models for the two major hydrosystems of the study area (Western and Eastern Sterea Hellas); and (c) the integration of all computer systems (databases, geographical information systems, application models) into a unified system with collaborating components.

  1. Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems

    Duration: February 1996–September 1996

    Commissioned by: Directorate of Water and Natural Resources

    Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering

    Collaborators:

    1. Directorate of Water and Natural Resources
    2. Institute of Geological and Mining Research
    3. Centre for Research and Planning

    Project director: D. Koutsoyiannis

    Principal investigator: A. Andreadakis

    The project part related to water quantity aims at the development of a methodology for establishing a water balance between supply and demand and extracting the most important summary characteristics that are then entered into a geographical information system. The methodology is applied to characteristic areas (water districts) of Greece with adequacy of information (based on existing studies). The project part related to water quality aims at the characterisation of the rivers, lakes and aquifers based on the water quality characteristics, and the water uses and requirements. The characterisation is based on the classification of critical quantity parameters that have been measured and includes the use of a geographical information system.

Details on engineering studies

  1. Consultancy Services for Conceptual Design, Preparation of Bidding Documents, Assistance during the Selection of Contractor & Monitoring/Supervision of Construction, Instalation, Operation & Maintainance for Traffic Control (CTC) for Greater Gaborone City

    Contractor: Erasmos Consulting Engineering

  1. Έργα Ορεινής Υδρονομίας Ρεμάτων Ορεινών Λεκανών Απορροής Αλμωπίας

  1. Pleriminary study of Almopaios dam

    Duration: July 2014–July 2014

    Commissioned by: Roikos Consulting Engeineers S.A.

  1. Study of the management of Kephisos

    Duration: June 2009–April 2010

    Commissioned by: General Secretariat of Public Works

    Contractors:

    1. Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson
    2. Denco
    3. G. Karavokiris
    4. et al.

  1. Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta

    Duration: January 2009–February 2010

    Commissioned by: Municipality of Arta

    Contractors:

    1. ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers
    2. YDROTEK
    3. V. Mouzos

  1. Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας

    Duration: January 2006–December 2006

    Commissioned by: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food

    Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co.

Published work in detail

Publications in scientific journals

  1. N. Mamassis, K. Mazi, E. Dimitriou, D. Kalogeras, N. Malamos, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, I. L. Tsirogiannis, I. Papageorgaki, A. Papadopoulos, Y. Panagopoulos, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, G. Vitantzakis, N. Kappos, D. Katsanos, B. Psiloglou, E. Rozos, T. Kopania, I. Koletsis, and A. D. Koussis, OpenHi.net: A synergistically built, national-scale infrastructure for monitoring the surface waters of Greece, Water, 13 (19), 2779, doi:10.3390/w13192779, 2021.

    The large-scale surface-water monitoring infrastructure for Greece Open Hydrosystem Information Network (Openhi.net) is presented in this paper. Openhi.net provides free access to water data, incorporating existing networks that manage their own databases. In its pilot phase, Openhi.net operates three telemetric networks for monitoring the quantity and the quality of surface waters, as well as meteorological and soil variables. Aspiring members must also offer their data for public access. A web-platform was developed for on-line visualization, processing and managing telemetric data. A notification system was also designed and implemented for inspecting the current values of variables. The platform is built upon the web 2.0 technology that exploits the ever-increasing capabilities of browsers to handle dynamic data as a time series. A GIS component offers web-services relevant to geo-information for water bodies. Accessing, querying and downloading geographical data for watercourses (segment length, slope, name, stream order) and for water basins (area, mean elevation, mean slope, basin order, slope, mean CN-curve number) are provided by Web Map Services and Web Feature Services. A new method for estimating the streamflow from measurements of the surface velocity has been advanced as well to reduce hardware expenditures, a low-cost ‘prototype’ hydro-telemetry system (at about half the cost of a comparable commercial system) was designed, constructed and installed at six monitoring stations of Openhi.net.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/2147/1/documents/water-13-02779-v2.pdf (3567 KB)

    See also: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/13/19/2779

  1. G. Papaioannou, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, A. Alamanos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, I. Tsoukalas, and P. Kossieris, A flood inundation modelling approach for urban and rural areas in lake and large-scale river basins, Water, 13 (9), 1264, doi:10.3390/w13091264, 2021.

    Fluvial floods are one of the primary natural hazards to our society, and the associated flood risk should always be evaluated for present and future conditions. The European Union’s Floods Di-rective highlights the importance of flood mapping as a key-stage for detecting vulnerable areas, assessing floods’ impacts, and identifying damages and compensation plans. The implementation of the E.U. Flood Directive in Greece is challenging, because of its geophysical and climatic var-iability and diverse hydrologic and hydraulic conditions. This study addresses this challenge by modelling of design rainfall at sub-watershed level and subsequent estimation of flood design hydrographs using the NRCS Unit Hydrograph Procedure. HEC-RAS 2D model is used for flood routing, estimation of flood attributes (i.e., water depths and flow velocities) and mapping of inundated areas. The modelling approach has been applied at two complex and ungauged rep-resentative basins: Lake Pamvotida basin located in the Epirus Region of the wet western Greece and Pinios River basin located in Thessaly Region of the drier central Greece, a basin with a complex dendritic hydrographic system, expanding to more than 1188 river-km. The proposed modelling approach aims to better estimation and mapping of flood inundation areas including relative uncertainties and providing guidance to professionals and academics.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/2121/1/documents/water-13-01264-v2.pdf (45029 KB)

    See also: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/13/9/1264

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Varlas, G., A. Papadopoulos, G. Papaioannou, and E. Dimitriou, Evaluating the forecast skill of a hydrometeorological modelling system in Greece, Atmosphere, 12(7), 902, doi:10.3390/atmos12070902, 2021.
    2. Karamvasis, K., and V. Karathanassi, FLOMPY: An open-source toolbox for floodwater mapping using Sentinel-1 intensity time series, Water, 13(21), 2943, doi:10.3390/w13212943, 2021.

  1. G. Papaioannou, A. Efstratiadis, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, S.M. Papalexiou, A. Koukouvinos, I. Tsoukalas, and P. Kossieris, An operational method for Floods Directive implementation in ungauged urban areas, Hydrology, 5 (2), 24, doi:10.3390/hydrology5020024, 2018.

    An operational framework for flood risk assessment in ungauged urban areas is developed within the implementation of the EU Floods Directive in Greece, and demonstrated for Volos metropolitan area, central Greece, which is frequently affected by intense storms causing fluvial flash floods. A scenario-based approach is applied, accounting for uncertainties of key modeling aspects. This comprises extreme rainfall analysis, resulting to spatially-distributed Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) relationships and their confidence intervals, and flood simulations, through the SCS-CN method and the unit hydrograph theory, producing design hydrographs at the sub-watershed scale, for several soil moisture conditions. The propagation of flood hydrographs and the mapping of inundated areas are employed by the HEC-RAS 2D model, with flexible mesh size, by representing the resistance caused by buildings through the local elevation rise method. For all hydrographs, upper and lower estimates on water depths, flow velocities and inundation areas are estimated, for varying roughness coefficient values. The methodology is validated against the flood event of the 9th October 2006, using observed flood inundation data. Our analyses indicate that although typical engineering practices for ungauged basins are subject to major uncertainties, the hydrological experience may counterbalance the missing information, thus ensuring quite realistic outcomes.

    Remarks:

    This article won the Hydrology Best Paper Award for 2020 (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/hydrology/awards/850)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1829/1/documents/hydrology-05-00024_Idnk8fW.pdf (5243 KB)

    Additional material:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Petroselli, A., M. Vojtek, and J. Vojteková, Flood mapping in small ungauged basins: A comparison of different approaches for two case studies in Slovakia, Hydrology Research, 50(1), 379-392, doi:10.2166/nh.2018.040, 2018.
    2. Manfreda, S., C. Samela, A. Refice, V. Tramutoli, and F. Nardi, Advances in large-scale flood monitoring and detection, Hydrology, 5(3), 49, doi:10.3390/hydrology5030049, 2018.
    3. Doroszkiewicz, J., R. J. Romanowicz, and A. Kiczko, The influence of flow projection errors on flood hazard estimates in future climate conditions, Water, 11(1), 49, doi:10.3390/w11010049, 2019.
    4. Enigl, K., C. Matulla, M. Schlögla, and F. Schmid, Derivation of canonical total-sequences triggering landslides and floodings in complex terrain, Advances in Water Resources, 129, 178-188, doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2019.04.018, 2019.
    5. Chen, N., S. Yao, C. Wang, and W. Du, A method for urban flood risk assessment and zoning considering road environments and terrain, Sustainability, 11(10), 2734, doi:10.3390/su11102734, 2019.
    6. Jiang, X., L., Yang, and H. Tatano, Assessing spatial flood risk from multiple flood sources in a small river basin: A method based on multivariate design rainfall, Water, 11(5), 1031, doi:10.3390/w11051031, 2019.
    7. Vojtek, M., A. Petroselli, J. Vojteková, and S. Asgharinia, Flood inundation mapping in small and ungauged basins: sensitivity analysis using the EBA4SUB and HEC-RAS modeling approach, Hydrology Research, 50(4), 1002-1019, doi:10.2166/nh.2019.163, 2019.
    8. Lorenzo-Lacruz, J., C. Garcia, E. Morán-Tejeda, A. Amengual, V. Homar, A. Maimó-Far, A. Hermoso, C. Ramis, and R. Romero, Hydro-meteorological reconstruction and geomorphological impact assessment of the October, 2018 catastrophic flash flood at Sant Llorenç, Mallorca (Spain), Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 19(11), 2597-2617, doi:10.5194/nhess-19-2597-2019, 2019.
    9. Hamdan, A. N. A., A. A. Abbas, and A. T. Najm, Flood hazard analysis of proposed regulator on Shatt Al-Arab river, Hydrology, 6(3), 80, doi:0.3390/hydrology6030080, 2019.
    10. Deby, R., V. Dermawan, and D. Sisinggih, Analysis of Wanggu river flood inundation Kendari City Southeast Sulawesi province using HEC RAS 5.0.6, International Research Journal of Advanced Engineering and Science, 4(2), 270-275, 2019.
    11. Rauter, M., T. Thaler, M.-S. Attems, and S. Fuchs, Obligation or innovation: Can the EU Floods Directive Be seen as a tipping point towards more resilient flood risk management? A case study from Vorarlberg, Austria, Sustainability, 11, 5505, doi:10.3390/su11195505, 2019.
    12. Papaioannou, G., G. Varlas, G. Terti, A. Papadopoulos, A. Loukas, Y. Panagopoulos, and E. Dimitriou, Flood inundation mapping at ungauged basins using coupled hydrometeorological-hydraulic modelling: The catastrophic case of the 2006 flash flood in Volos City, Greece, Water, 11, 2328, doi:10.3390/w11112328, 2019.
    13. Rahmati, O., H. Darabi, A. T. Haghighi, S. Stefanidis, A. Kornejady, O. A. Nalivan, and D. T. Bui, Urban flood hazard modeling using self-organizing map neural network, Water, 11(11), 2370, doi:10.3390/w11112370, 2019.
    14. Dano, U. L., A.-L. Balogun, A.-N. Matori,K. Wan Yusouf, I. R. Abubakar, M. A. Said Mohamed, , Y.A. Aina, and B. Pradhan, Flood susceptibility mapping using an improved analytic network process with statistical models, Water, 11(3), 615, doi:10.3390/w11030615, 2019.
    15. Petroselli, A., S. Grimaldi, R. Piscopia, and F. Tauro, Design hydrograph estimation in small and ungauged basins: a comparative assessment of event based (EBA4SUB) and continuous (COSMO4SUB) modeling approaches, Acta Scientiarum Polonorum Formatio Circumiectus, 18(4), 113-124, doi:10.15576/ASP.FC/2019.18.4.113, 2019.
    16. Nguyen, V.-N., P. Yariyan, M. Amiri, A. Dang Tran, T.D. Pham, M.P. Do, P. T. Thi Ngo, V.-H. Nhu, N. Quoc Long, and D. Tien Bui, A new modeling approach for spatial prediction of flash flood with biogeography optimized CHAID tree ensemble and remote sensing data, Remote Sensing, 12(9), 1373, doi:10.3390/rs12091373, 2020.
    17. Kastridis, A., and D. Stathis, Evaluation of hydrological and hydraulic models applied in typical Mediterranean ungauged watersheds using post-flash-flood measurements, Hydrology, 7(1), 12, doi:10.3390/hydrology7010012, 2020.
    18. Stavropoulos, S., G. N. Zaimes, E. Filippidis, D. C. Diaconu, and D. Emmanouloudis, Mitigating flash floods with the use of new technologies: A multi-criteria decision analysis to map flood susceptibility for Zakynthos island, Greece, Journal of Urban & Regional Analysis, 12(2), 233-248, 2020.
    19. Kastridis, A., C. Kirkenidis, and M. Sapountzis, An integrated approach of flash flood analysis in ungauged Mediterranean watersheds using post‐flood surveys and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Hydrological Processes, 34(25), 4920-4939, doi:10.1002/hyp.13913, 2020.
    20. Abdrabo, K. I., S. A. Kantoush, M. Saber, T. Sumi, O. M. Habiba, D. Elleithy, and B. Elboshy, Integrated methodology for urban flood risk mapping at the microscale in ungauged regions: A case study of Hurghada, Egypt, Remote Sensing, 12(21), 3548, doi:10.3390/rs12213548, 2020.
    21. Yariyan, P., M. Avand, R. A. Abbaspour, A. T. Haghighi, R. Costache, O. Ghorbanzadeh, S. Janizadeh, and T. Blaschke, Flood susceptibility mapping using an improved analytic network process with statistical models, Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk, 11(1), 2282-2314, doi:10.1080/19475705.2020.1836036, 2020.
    22. Papaioannou, G., C. Papadaki, and E. Dimitriou, Sensitivity of habitat hydraulic model outputs to DTM and computational mesh resolution, Ecohydrology, 13(2), e2182, doi:10.1002/eco.2182, 2020.
    23. Papaioannou, G., G. Varlas, A. Papadopoulos, A. Loukas, P. Katsafados, and E. Dimitriou, Investigating sea‐state effects on flash flood hydrograph and inundation forecasting, Hydrological Processes, 35(4), e14151, doi:10.1002/hyp.14151, 2021.
    24. Mahamat Nour, A., C. Vallet‐Coulomb, J. Gonçalves, F. Sylvestre, and P. Deschamps, Rainfall-discharge relationship and water balance over the past 60 years within the Chari-Logone sub-basins, Lake Chad basin, Journal of Hydrology: Regional Studies, 35, 100824, doi:10.1016/j.ejrh.2021.100824, 2021.
    25. Varlas, G., A. Papadopoulos, G. Papaioannou, and E. Dimitriou, Evaluating the forecast skill of a hydrometeorological modelling system in Greece, Atmosphere, 12(7), 902, doi:10.3390/atmos12070902, 2021.
    26. Khalaj, M. R., H. Noor, and A. Dastranj, Investigation and simulation of flood inundation hazard in urban areas in Iran, Geoenvironmental Disasters, 8, 18, doi:10.1186/s40677-021-00191-1, 2021.
    27. Hooke, J., J. Souza, and M. Marchamalo, Evaluation of connectivity indices applied to a Mediterranean agricultural catchment, Catena, 207, 105713, doi:10.1016/j.catena.2021.105713, 2021.
    28. Seleem, O., M. Heistermann, and A. Bronstert, Efficient hazard assessment for pluvial floods in urban environments: A benchmarking case study for the city of Berlin, Germany, Water, 13(18), 2476, doi:10.3390/w13182476, 2021.
    29. Cotugno, A., V. Smith, T. Baker, and R. Srinivasan, A framework for calculating peak discharge and flood inundation in ungauged urban watersheds using remotely sensed precipitation data: A case study in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Remote Sensing, 13(19), 3806, doi:10.3390/rs13193806, 2021.
    30. Berteni, F., A. Dada, and G. Grossi, Application of the MUSLE model and potential effects of climate change in a small Alpine catchment in Northern Italy, Water, 13(19), 2679, doi:10.3390/w13192679, 2021.

  1. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Timing the time of concentration: shedding light on a paradox, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 63 (5), 721–740, doi:10.1080/02626667.2018.1450985, 2018.

    From the origins of hydrology, the time of concentration, tc, has been conventionally tackled as constant quantity. However, theoretical proof and empirical evidence imply that tc exhibits significant variability against rainfall, making its definition and estimation a hydrological paradox. Adopting the assumptions of the Rational method and the kinematic approach, an effective procedure in a GIS environment for estimating the travel time across a catchment’s longest flow path is provided. By applying it in 30 Mediterranean basins, it is illustrated that tc is a negative power function of excess rainfall intensity. Regional formulas are established to infer its multiplier (unit time of concentration) and exponent from abstract geomorphological information, which are validated against observed data and theoretical literature outcomes. Besides offering a fast and easy solution to the paradox, we highlight the necessity for implementing the varying tc concept within hydrological modelling, signalling a major shift from current engineering practices.

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Yazdia, M. N., D. J. Sample, D. Scott, J. Owen, M. Ketabchy, and N. Alamdari, Water quality characterization of storm and irrigation runoff from a container nursery, Science of the Total Environment, 667, 166-178, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.326, 2019.
    2. Jiang, X., L., Yang, and H. Tatano, Assessing spatial flood risk from multiple flood sources in a small river basin: A method based on multivariate design rainfall, Water, 11(5), 1031, doi:10.3390/w11051031, 2019.
    3. Harisuseno, D., D. N. Khaeruddin, and R. Haribowo, Time of concentration based infiltration under different soil density, water content, and slope during a steady rainfall, Journal of Water and Land Development, 41 (IV–VI), 61-68, doi:10.2478/jwld-2019-0028, 2019.
    4. Vojtek, M., A. Petroselli, J. Vojteková, and S. Asgharinia, Flood inundation mapping in small and ungauged basins: sensitivity analysis using the EBA4SUB and HEC-RAS modeling approach, Hydrology Research, 50(4), 1002-1019, doi:10.2166/nh.2019.163, 2019.
    5. Osuagwu, J., J. C. Agunwamba, and C. E. Nwabunor, Verification of time of concentration equation for improved drainage design, Environmental Management and Sustainable Development, 8(2), 151-161, doi:10.5296/emsd.v8i2.14902, 2019.
    6. Sandoval, S., and J.-L. Bertrand-Krajewski, From marginal to conditional probability functions of parameters in a conceptual rainfall-runoff model: an event-based approach, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 64(11), 1340-1350, doi:10.1080/02626667.2019.1635696, 2019.
    7. Masseroni, D., G. Ercolani, E. A. Chiaradia, and C. Gandolfi, A procedure for designing natural water retention measures in new development areas under hydraulic-hydrologic invariance constraints, Hydrology Research, 50(5), 1293-1308, doi:10.2166/nh.2019.018, 2019.
    8. Santos, S. M., J. C. N. Pscheidt, G. Tiago, S. Klein, N. B. Bonumá, P. L. B. Chaffe, and K. Masato, Time of concentration in an experimental basin: Methods for analysis, backwater effects and vegetation removal, Journal of Urban & Environmental Engineering, 13(1), 163-173, 2019.
    9. Beven, K. J., A history of the concept of time of concentration, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 24, 2655–2670, doi:10.5194/hess-24-2655-2020, 2020.
    10. Veeck, S., F. F. da Costa, D. L. C. Lima, A. Rolim da Paz, and D. G. A. Piccilli, Scale dynamics of the HIDROPIXEL high-resolution DEM-based distributed hydrologic modeling approach, Environmental Modelling & Software, 127, 104695, doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2020.104695, 2020.
    11. Allnutt, C. E., O. J. Gericke, and J. P. J. Pietersen, Estimation of time parameter proportionality ratios in large catchments: Case study of the Modder‐Riet River Catchment, South Africa, Journal of Flood Risk Management, 13(3), e12628, doi:10.1111/jfr3.12628, 2020.
    12. González-Álvarez, Á., J. Molina-Pérez, B. Meza-Zúñiga, O. M. Viloria-Marimón, K. Tesfagiorgis, and J. A. Mouthón-Bello, Assessing the performance of different time of concentration equations in urban ungauged watersheds: Case study of Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, Hydrology, 7(3), 47, doi:10.3390/hydrology7030047, 2020.
    13. Dey, R., A. J. E. Gallant, and S. C. Lewis, Evidence of a continent-wide shift of episodic rainfall in Australia, Weather and Climate Extremes, 29, 100274, doi:10.1016/j.wace.2020.100274, 2020.
    14. Kastridis, A., C. Kirkenidis, and M. Sapountzis, An integrated approach of flash flood analysis in ungauged Mediterranean watersheds using post‐flood surveys and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Hydrological Processes, 34(25), 4920-4939, doi:10.1002/hyp.13913, 2020.
    15. Ruman, S., R. Tichavský, K. Šilhán, K. and M. G. Grillakis, Palaeoflood discharge estimation using dendrogeomorphic methods, rainfall-runoff and hydraulic modelling—a case study from southern Crete, Natural Hazards, 105, 1721-1742, doi:10.1007/s11069-020-04373-2, 2021.
    16. Giani, G., M. A. Rico‐Ramirez, and R. A. Woods, A practical, objective and robust technique to directly estimate catchment response time, Water Resources Research, 57(2), e2020WR028201, doi:10.1029/2020WR028201, 2021.
    17. Bournas, A., and E. Baltas, Comparative analysis of rain gauge and radar precipitation estimates towards rainfall-runoff modelling in a peri-urban basin in Attica, Greece, Hydrology, 8(1), 29, doi:10.3390/hydrology8010029, 2021.
    18. Jato-Espino, D., and S. Pathak, Geographic location system for identifying urban road sections sensitive to runoff accumulation, Hydrology, 8(2), 72, doi:10.3390/hydrology8020072, 2021.
    19. Nash, D. M., A. J. Weatherley, P. J. A. Kleinman, and A. N. Sharpley, Estimating dissolved p losses from legacy sources in pastures - The limits of soil tests and small-scale rainfall simulators, Journal of Environmental Quality, doi:10.1002/jeq2.20265, 2021.
    20. Almedeij. J., Modified NRCS abstraction method for flood hydrograph generation, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 47(10), doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0001609, 2021.
    21. Lapides, D. A., A. Sytsma, O. Crompton, and S. Thompson, Rational method time of concentration can underestimate peak discharge for hillslopes, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 147(10), doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0001900, 2021.
    22. Lapides, D. A., A. Sytsma, and S. Thompson, Implications of distinct methodological interpretations and runoff coefficient usage for rational method predictions, Journal of the American Water Resources Association, doi:10.1111/1752-1688.12949, 2021.
    23. Fadhel, S., M. Al Aukidy, and M. S. Saleh, Uncertainty of intensity-duration-frequency curves due to adoption or otherwise of the temperature climate variable in rainfall disaggregation, Water, 13(17), 2337, doi:10.3390/w13172337, 2021.
    24. Tardif, F., F. St-Pierre, G. Pelletier, and M. J. Rodriguez, Comparison of methods to evaluate overland travel times for source water protection, Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, doi:10.1080/09640568.2021.1952858, 2021.

  1. E. Savvidou, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Skarlatos, The curve number concept as a driver for delineating hydrological response units, Water, 10 (2), 194, doi:10.3390/w10020194, 2018.

    In this paper, a new methodology for delineating Hydrological Response Units (HRUs), based on the Curve Number (CN) concept, is presented. Initially, a semi-automatic procedure in a GIS environment is used to produce basin maps of distributed CN values as the product of the three classified layers, soil permeability, land use/land cover characteristics and drainage capacity. The map of CN values is used in the context of model parameterization, in order to identify the essential number and spatial extent of HRUs and, consequently, the number of control variables of the calibration problem. The new approach aims at reducing the subjectivity introduced by the definition of HRUs and providing parsimonious modelling schemes. In particular, the CN-based parameterization (1) allows the user to assign as many parameters as can be supported by the available hydrological information, (2) associates the model parameters with anticipated basin responses, as quantified in terms of CN classes across HRUs, and (3) reduces the effort for model calibration, simultaneously ensuring good predictive capacity. The advantages of the proposed approach are demonstrated in the hydrological simulation of the Nedontas River Basin, Greece, where parameterizations of different complexities are employed in a recently improved version of the HYDROGEIOS model. A modelling experiment with a varying number of HRUs, where the parameter estimation problem was handled through automatic optimization, showed that the parameterization with three HRUs, i.e., equal to the number of flow records, ensured the optimal performance. Similarly, tests with alternative HRU configurations confirmed that the optimal scores, both in calibration and validation, were achieved by the CN-based approach, also resulting in parameters values across the HRUs that were in agreement with their physical interpretation.

    Full text:

    See also: http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/10/2/194

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    1. Aqnouy, M., J. E. S. El Messari, H. Ismail, A. Bouadila, J. G. M. Navarro, B. Loubna, and M. R. A. Mansour, Assessment of the SWAT model and the parameters affecting the flow simulation in the watershed of Oued Laou (Northern Morocco), Journal of Ecological Engineering, 20(4), 104-113, doi:10.12911/22998993/102794, 2019.
    2. Day, C., and G. Seay, Watershed surface characteristics and storm distribution impacts on low-order urban stream hydrology response, The Geographical Bulletin – Gamma Theta Upsilon, 60(2), 95-107, 2019.
    3. Rozos, E., A methodology for simple and fast streamflow modelling, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 65(7), 1084-1095, doi:10.1080/02626667.2020.1728475, 2020.
    4. Pobletei, D., J Arévaloi, O. Nicolis, and F. Figueroa, Optimization of the Hydrologic Response Units (HRU) using gridded meteorological data and spatially varying parameters, Earth and Space Science Open Archive, doi:10.1002/essoar.10502299.1, 2020.
    5. Weber, M., M. Feigl, K. Schulz, and M. Bernhardt, On the ability of LIDAR snow depth measurements to determine or evaluate the HRU discretization in a land surface model, Hydrology, 7(2), 20, doi:10.3390/hydrology7020020, 2020.
    6. Στεφανίδης, Σ. Ντάφης, και Χ. Γιάνναρος, Υδρολογική απόκριση της λεκάνης απορροής του χειμάρρου «Μπασδέκη» Ολυμπιάδας στην καταιγίδα της 25ης Νοεμβρίου 2019, Υδροτεχνικά (2019-2020), 29, 13-26, 2020.
    7. Soulis, K. X., E. Psomiadis, P. Londra, and D. Skuras, A new model-based approach for the evaluation of the net contribution of the European Union rural development program to the reduction of water abstractions in agriculture, Sustainability, 12(17), 7137, doi:10.3390/su12177137, 2020.
    8. Harisuseno, D., M. Bisri, and T.S. Haji, Inundation controlling practice in urban area: Case study in residential area of Malang, Indonesia, Journal of Water and Land Development, 46(VII–IX), 112–120, doi:10.24425/jwld.2020.134203, 2020.
    9. Nagel, G. W., F. Da Silva Terra, J. S. De Oliveira, I. Horák-Terra, and S. Beskow, Cálculo da curva número para bacia hidrográfica urbana utilizando diferentes abordagens de classificação para imagem orbital RapidEye: estudo de caso para o arroio Pepino (Pelotas, RS), Pesquisas em Geociências, 47(2), doi:10.22456/1807-9806.108583, 2020.
    10. Poblete, D., J. Arevalo, O. Nicolis, O., and F. Figueroa, Optimization of Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) using gridded meteorological data and spatially varying parameters, Water, 12(12), 3558, doi:10.3390/w12123558, 2020.
    11. Ramadan, A. N. A., D. Nurmayadi, A. Sadili, R. R. Solihin, and Z. Sumardi, Pataruman watershed Curve Number determination study based on Indonesia land map unit, Media Komunikasi Teknik Sipil, 26(2), 258-266, doi:10.14710/mkts.v26i2.26563, 2020.
    12. Athira, P., and K. P. Sudheer, Calibration of distributed hydrological models considering the heterogeneity of the parameters across the basin: a case study of SWAT model, Environmental Earth Sciences, 80, 131, doi:10.1007/s12665-021-09434-8, 2021.
    13. Assaye, H., J. Nyssen, J. Poesen, H. Lemma, D. T. Meshesha, A. Wassie, E. Adgo, and A. Frank, Curve number calibration for measuring impacts of land management in sub-humid Ethiopia, Journal of Hydrology, 35, 100819, doi:10.1016/j.ejrh.2021.100819, 2021.
    14. Gunn, K. M., A. R. Buda, H. E. Gall, R. Cibin, C. D. Kennedy, and T. L. Veith, Integrating daily CO2 concentrations in SWAT-VSA to examine climate change impacts on hydrology in a karst watershed, Transactions of the ASABE, doi:10.13031/trans.13711, 2021.

  1. P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, A. Oikonomou, V. Pagana, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Efstratiadis, Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping, Journal of Hydrology, 534, 478–492, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.01.020, 2016.

    One-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional hydraulic freeware models (HEC-RAS, LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2d) are widely used for flood inundation mapping. These models are tested on a benchmark test with a mixed rectangular-triangular channel cross section. Using a Monte-Carlo approach, we employ extended sensitivity analysis by simultaneously varying the input discharge, longitudinal and lateral gradients and roughness coefficients, as well as the grid cell size. Based on statistical analysis of three output variables of interest, i.e. water depths at the inflow and outflow locations and total flood volume, we investigate the uncertainty enclosed in different model configurations and flow conditions, without the influence of errors and other assumptions on topography, channel geometry and boundary conditions. Moreover, we estimate the uncertainty associated to each input variable and we compare it to the overall one. The outcomes of the benchmark analysis are further highlighted by applying the three models to real-world flood propagation problems, in the context of two challenging case studies in Greece.

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

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  1. A. Efstratiadis, I. Nalbantis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, HYDROGEIOS: A semi-distributed GIS-based hydrological model for modified river basins, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 12, 989–1006, doi:10.5194/hess-12-989-2008, 2008.

    The HYDROGEIOS modelling framework represents the main processes of the hydrological cycle in heavily modified catchments, with decision-depended abstractions and interactions between surface and groundwater flows. A semi-distributed approach and a monthly simulation time step are adopted, which are sufficient for water resources management studies. The modelling philosophy aims to ensure consistency with the physical characteristics of the system, while keeping the number of parameters as low as possible. Therefore, multiple levels of schematisation and parameterisation are adopted, by combining multiple levels of geographical data. To optimally allocate human abstractions from the hydrosystem during a planning horizon or even to mimic the allocation occurred in a past period (e.g. the calibration period), in the absence of measured data, a linear programming problem is formulated and solved within each time step. With this technique the fluxes across the hydrosystem are estimated, and the satisfaction of physical and operational constraints is ensured. The model framework includes a parameter estimation module that involves various goodness-of-fit measures and state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms for global and multiobjective optimisation. By means of a challenging case study, the paper discusses appropriate modelling strategies which take advantage of the above framework, with the purpose to ensure a robust calibration and reproduce natural and human induced processes in the catchment as faithfully as possible.

    Remarks:

    Permission is granted to reproduce and modify this paper under the terms of the Creative Commons NonCommercial ShareAlike 2.5 license. The discussion paper and its reviews are shown in the HESSD site.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/787/1/documents/hess-12-989-2008.pdf (3843 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/hess-12-989-2008

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

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  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, A decision support system for the management of the water resource system of Athens, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 28 (14-15), 599–609, doi:10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2, 2003.

    The main components of a decision support system (DSS) developed to support the management of the water resource system of Athens are presented. The DSS includes information systems that perform data acquisition, management and visualisation, and models that perform simulation and optimisation of the hydrosystem. The models, which are the focus of the present work, are organised into two main modules. The first one is a stochastic hydrological simulator, which, based on the analysis of historical hydrological data, generates simulations and forecasts of the hydrosystem inputs. The second one allows the detailed study of the hydrosystem under alternative management policies implementing the parameterisation-simulation-optimisation methodology. The mathematical framework of this new methodology performs the allocation of the water resources to the different system components, keeping the number of control variables small and thus reducing the computational effort, even for a complex hydrosystem like the one under study. Multiple, competitive targets and constraints with different priorities can be set, which are concerned among others, with the system reliability and risk, the overall average operational cost and the overall guaranteed yield of the system. The DSS is in the final stage of its development and its results, some of which are summarised in the paper, have been utilised to support the new masterplan of the hydrosystem management.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1474-7065(03)00106-2

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    30. #Bouziotas, D., and M. Ertsen, Socio-hydrology from the bottom up: A template for agent-based modeling in irrigation systems, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, doi:10.5194/hess-2017-107, 2017.
    31. #Payano, R., J.A. Pascual-Aguilar, and I. de Bustamante, Criterios para la incorporación de la información sobre usos del suelo en un Sistema de Apoyo a la Toma de Decisiones sobre Patrimonio Hidráulico, Nuevas perspectivas de la Geomática aplicadas al estudio de los paisajes y el patrimonio hidráulico (Geomatics: New perspectives for the study of water landscapes and cultural heritage), J.A. Pascual-Aguilar, J. Sanz, and I. de Bustamante (eds.), Centro para el Conocimiento del Paisaje-Civilscape, 2017.
    32. Stamou, A. T., and P. Rutschmann, Pareto optimization of water resources using the nexus approach, Water Resources Management, 32(15), 5053-5065, doi:10.1007/s11269-018-2127-x, 2018.
    33. Kazak, J. K., J. Chruściński, and S. Szewrański, The development of a novel decision support system for the location of green infrastructure for stormwater management, Sustainability, 10(12), 4388; doi:10.3390/su10124388, 2018.
    34. Heidari, A., Application of multidisciplinary water resources planning tools for two of the largest rivers of Iran, Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research, 6(2), 150-161, doi:10.1080/23249676.2016.1215271, 2018.
    35. Ghobadi M., and H. S. Kaboli, Developing a Web-based decision support system for reservoir flood management, Journal of Hydroinformatics, 22(3), 641-662, doi:10.2166/hydro.2020.185, 2020.
    36. Poursanidis, D., S. Kalogirou, E. Azzurro, V. Parravicini, M. Barich, and H. zu Dohna, Habitat suitability, niche unfilling and the potential spread of Pterois miles in the Mediterranean Sea, Marine Pollution Bulletin, 154, 111054, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111054, 2020.
    37. Stamou, A.-T., and P. Rutschmann, Optimization of water use based on the water-energy-food nexus concept: Application to the long-term development scenario of the Upper Blue Nile River, Water Utility Journal, 25, 1-13, 2020.
    38. Alamanos, A., A. Rolston, and G. Papaioannou, Development of a decision support system for sustainable environmental management and stakeholder engagement, Hydrology, 8(1), 40, doi:10.3390/hydrology8010040, 2021.

Book chapters and fully evaluated conference publications

  1. G. Papaioannou, L. Vasiliades, A. Loukas, A. Efstratiadis, S.M. Papalexiou, Y. Markonis, and A. Koukouvinos, A methodological approach for flood risk management in urban areas: The Volos city paradigm, 10th World Congress on Water Resources and Environment "Panta Rhei", Athens, European Water Resources Association, 2017.

    A methodological approach based on the implementation of the EU Floods Directive in Greece is developed and presented for flood risk management of urban areas. The flood risk assessment procedure is demonstrated for Volos city of Thessaly, Greece, where frequent flood episodes are observed due to intense storms. A unified deterministic extreme event-based methodology is applied for hydrologic and hydraulic modelling of floods. The hydrologic part is based on semi-distributed application of the HEC-HMS rainfall-runoff model with spatially-distributed design hyetographs. The SCS-CN method is used to estimate effective rainfall and the SCS synthetic unit hydrograph to produce extreme flood hydrographs at subwatershed scale. The hydraulic modelling is based on the propagation of flood hydrographs across the river network and the mapping of inundated areas using the HEC-RAS 2D model with flexible mesh size. Representation of the resistance caused by buildings have been simulated with the local elevation rise method using transformation of the Digital Terrain Model to a Digital Elevation Model. For the adopted design hyetographs upper and lower estimates on water depths, flow velocities and flood inundation areas are estimated taking into account structural and parameter uncertainty of the hydrologic and hydraulic models by varying antecedent soil moisture conditions and roughness coefficient values. The results indicate the uncertainty introduced on flood risk management in urban areas using typical engineering practices.

    Related works:

    • [3] Full research article published in Hydrology.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1707/1/documents/EWRA2017_A_103184_UTH_NTUA.pdf (3124 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Ruchinskaya, T., and K. Lalenis, Building urban resilience of public places in Volos, Greece. Perspectives and possibilities of related contribution of blockchain technology, Proceedings of IFoU 2018: Reframing Urban Resilience Implementation: Aligning Sustainability and Resilience, Barcelona, doi:10.3390/IFOU2018-05931, 2018.
    2. #Ruchinskaya, T., and K. Lalenis, The effect of public places on community resilience. A case study of the role of social and digital tools in the City of Volos (Greece), in: Smaniotto Costa, C. et al. (eds.): C3Places, Culture & Territory 04, 201-214, doi:10.24140/2020-sct-vol.4-2.3, 2020.

  1. A. Tsouni, C. Contoes, E. Ieronymidi, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, BEYOND Center of Excellence: flood mapping and modelling, 1st International Geomatics Applications “Geomapplica” Conference, Skiathos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1129.7520, University of Thessaly, 2014.

    Flood is defined as ‘a covering by water of land not normally covered by water’ in the European Union Floods Directive 2007/60/EC. Human activities, such as agriculture, urban development, industry and tourism, contribute to an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events. It is thus important to establish flood risk management plans focused on prevention, protection and preparedness. The ultimate goal of the Flood Hazard activities in the BEYOND Center of Excellence is to reduce and manage the risks that floods pose to human health, the environment, cultural heritage and economic activity. In this direction, we select river basins at high risk of flooding, we study the hydraulic behaviour of the river, and we proceed to the flood modelling validation and enhancement with the integration of satellite and radar data. In the context of the implementation of BEYOND by the National Observatory of Athens, we have launched the Floods Observatory in Greece where we register the major flood events in Greece and we publish the results we produce following process of satellite and radar images. Our first area of interest is Arachthos river basin, a river with several flood events, very close to the city of Arta, where the Public Power Corporation S.A. is operating two hydroelectric plants.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1565/1/documents/Paper_BEYOND_Floods_v2a.pdf (1110 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1129.7520

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, N. Kappos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrometeorological network for flood monitoring and modeling, Proceedings of First International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of Environment, Paphos, Cyprus, 8795, 10-1–10-10, doi:10.1117/12.2028621, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2013.

    Due to its highly fragmented geomorphology, Greece comprises hundreds of small- to medium-size hydrological basins, in which often the terrain is fairly steep and the streamflow regime ephemeral. These are typically affected by flash floods, occasionally causing severe damages. Yet, the vast majority of them lack flow-gauging infrastructure providing systematic hydrometric data at fine time scales. This has obvious impacts on the quality and reliability of flood studies, which typically use simplistic approaches for ungauged basins that do not consider local peculiarities in sufficient detail. In order to provide a consistent framework for flood design and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk –a key issue of the 2007/60/EC Directive– it is essential to improve the monitoring infrastructures by taking advantage of modern technologies for remote control and data management. In this context and in the research project DEUCALION, we have recently installed and are operating, in four pilot river basins, a telemetry-based hydro-meteorological network that comprises automatic stations and is linked to and supported by relevant software. The hydrometric stations measure stage, using 50-kHz ultrasonic pulses or piezometric sensors, or both stage (piezometric) and velocity via acoustic Doppler radar; all measurements are being temperature-corrected. The meteorological stations record air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. Data transfer is made via GPRS or mobile telephony modems. The monitoring network is supported by a web-based application for storage, visualization and management of geographical and hydro-meteorological data (ENHYDRIS), a software tool for data analysis and processing (HYDROGNOMON), as well as an advanced model for flood simulation (HYDROGEIOS). The recorded hydro-meteorological observations are accessible over the Internet through the www-application. The system is operational and its functionality has been implemented as open-source software for use in a wide range of applications in the field of water resources monitoring and management, such as the demonstration case study outlined in this work.

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2028621

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Damte, F., B. G. Mariam, M. Teshome, T. K. Lohani, G. Dhiman, and M. Shabaz, Computing the sediment and ensuing its erosive activities using HEC-RAS to surmise the flooding in Kulfo River in Southern Ethiopia, World Journal of Engineering, doi:10.1108/WJE-01-2021-0002, 2021.

  1. K. Hadjibiros, A. Katsiri, A. Koukouvinos, N. Moutafis, and G. Vilandou, Sustainable management of a large-scale tourist facility with significant water demand, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, A672–A679, Rhodes, 2011.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1179/1/documents/CEST2011SustManagTouristActiv.pdf (251 KB)

  1. S. Mihas, K. Nikolaou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of sediment yield with MUSLE and monitoring. A case study for Tsiknias dam at Lesvos Island in Greece, IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals, Thessaloniki, 8 pages, 12 May 2015.

    The purpose of the present study is the estimation of sediment yield of Tsiknias river basin at the location of a dam under study. The Tsiknias reservoir will supply drinking water at Mytilene town and at a large area of Lesvos island in Northern Greece. Moreover, a small amount of the reservoir water is intended to satisfy the demands of the downstream irrigation system at Kalloni plain. The methods used for estimating the volume of sediment yield in this study are empirical by means of modern technologies like GIS models. The main methodology that estimates the sediment yield used at the present study is the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE). In comparison with MUSLE, other methods have also been tested like Gavrilovic [1] and Koutsoyiannis & Tarla equations [3]. The calculation of the sediment yield volume will be finalized by means of the field measurements that are in progress (10/2014 – next hydrological year). This program of measurements includes records of the flow, hydrometeorological data as well as sediment volumes (suspended and bedded sediment). Estimating the sediment transport at the location of the dam will affect not only the inactive storage of the dam, but it will also determine the design of the water abstraction works at the Tsiknias reservoir, as well as the design of structures required for a sustainable sedimentation management.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1558/1/documents/IWA_Thessaloniki_paper.pdf (1266 KB)

    Additional material:

Conference publications and presentations with evaluation of abstract

  1. I. Papageorgaki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, OpenHiGis: A national geographic database for inland waters of Greece based on the INSPIRE Directive Hydrology Theme, EGU General Assembly 2021, online, doi:10.5194/egusphere-egu21-13465, European Geosciences Union, 2021.

    The Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net) is an information infrastructure for the collection, management and dissemination of hydrologic information related to inland waters in Greece. The OpenHi.net is under development in the context of HIMIOFoTS, a national infrastructure integrating both marine and inland waters. OpenHi.net is mainly oriented to collect and manage river and lake stage data. Geographic data are essential to link stage data with the upstream basin’s hydrologic characteristics. The OpenHiGis is the GIS component of the OpenHi.net platform. The geographic database design and implementation are based on the Hydrography Theme specified by the INSPIRE Directive. The main goal is to collect, query, analyze, and offer web services relevant to hydrologic - geographic information for hydrographic network, lakes and reservoirs, river basins, drainage basins and station basins at a national level. In this sense, data stored for (a) hydrographic network (geometry, length, segment’s slope, geographical name and stream order), (b) lakes and reservoirs (geometry, area, elevation and geographical name) , and (c) basins (geometry, area, elevation, slope, basin order, main watercourse length and slope, runoff Curve Number.

    The European Digital Elevation Model (Copernicus, EU-DEM version 1.1) with spatial resolution of 25 m, is selected (after examining a few well-known elevation models) for extracting hypsometric information, which is basic for river basin’s response. Other main data sources found and used are the: (a) hydrographic network, lakes and reservoirs from the implementation of EU 2000/60/EC Directive, (b) hydrographic network from EU 2007/60/EC Directive and (c) OpenStreetMap publically available hydrographic network and river networks from various scanned maps at scales approximately 1:50 k.

    The ArcGIS Model Builder environment is used as the main spatial analysis tool. Several models are created to run the geographic processes and perform calculations (create INSPIRE compliant geodatabase, data import from various sources, watercourse extraction from DEM and hydrographic network definition, river basins delineation and geomorphologic attributes calculation, watercourse naming, topology creation and validation). The extraction of a primary (before editing) watercourse line is achieved by using the EU-DEM, applying an upslope contribution area threshold equal to 10 km2, which is proposed by the EU 2000/60/EC Directive. Spatial relationships between features are defined using topological rules. All the modeling procedures and the output datasets are considered to be at a scale 1:50 k.

    The QGIS software is used to perform the final editing by using OSM’s, ESRI’s, Google’s and Bing’s base-maps. Furthermore, QGIS is used to make a connection to the ArcGIS geodatabase and transfer the data to PostGIS (Postgres). Finally, the MapServer software is used for publishing the data to the web. Two services, the Web Map Service (WMS) and the Web Feature Service (WFS), are provided to the user to access, query or download the geographic data through the OpenHi.net platform.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/2123/1/documents/EGU21-13465_presentation.pdf (594 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, K. Mazi, A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, E. Demetriou, N. Malamos, A. Christofides, and D. Kalogeras, Open Hydrosystem Information Network: Greece’s new research infrastructure for water, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2020, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 22, Vienna, EGU2020-4164, doi:10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-4164, 2020.

    The Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net) is a state-of-the-art information infrastructure for the collection, management and free dissemination of hydrological and environmental information related to Greece’s surface water resources. It was launched two years ago as part of the national research infrastructure “Hellenic Integrated Marine Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System” (HIMIOFoTS), which also comprises a marine-related component (https://www.himiofots.gr/). The OpenHi.net system receives and processes real-time data from automatic telemetric stations that are connected to a common web environment (https://openhi.net/). In particular, for each monitoring site it accommodates stage measurements, raw and automatically post-processed. Furthermore, in some specially selected sites time series related to water quality characteristics (pH, water temperature, salinity, DO, electrical conductivity) are provided. The web platform also offers automatically-processed information in terms of discharge data, statistics, and graphs, alerts for extreme events, as well as geographical data associated with surface water bodies. At the present time, the network comprises about 20 stations. However, their number is continuously increasing, due to the open access policy of the system (the platform is fully accessible to third-parties uploading their data). In the long run, it is envisioned that a national-scale hydrometric infrastructure will be established, covering all important rivers, lakes and reservoirs of the country.

    Full text:

    See also: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2020/EGU2020-4164.html

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, K. Mazi, E. Dimitriou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Strategic plan for establishing a national-scale hydrometric network in Greece: challenges and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2019, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 21, Vienna, EGU2019-16714, European Geosciences Union, 2019.

    The protection and management of water and environmental resources require the availability of reliable data, collected by properly designed, equipped and functioning monitoring networks. However, for many years in Greece, the status of data collection and archiving has been far from adequate, thus preventing the country from managing its water resources properly. Today, a large effort to mitigate this gap is employed, within a recently launched research infrastructure called “Open Hydrosystem Information Network” (OpenHi.net). This aims establishing automatic monitoring systems for the surface water resources at the national scale, accompanied by supporting e-infrastructure (databases and modeling applications), in compliance with the requirements of the relevant EU Directives. Essential component of this initiative is the implementation of a detailed evaluation of all existing measuring infrastructures and associated data, resulting to a strategic planning for the installation of the new monitoring stations across all important rivers, lakes and reservoirs of the country. This presentation summarizes the outcomes of this work, and the experience gained so far from the operation of first pilot stations.

    Full text:

  1. C. Ntigkakis, G. Markopoulos-Sarikas, P. Dimitriadis, T. Iliopoulou, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. D. Koussis, K. Mazi, D. Katsanos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrological investigation of the catastrophic flood event in Mandra, Western Attica, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 20, Vienna, EGU2018-17591-1, European Geosciences Union, 2018.

    A recent storm event, of substantial yet unknown local intensity, in Western Attica (west of Athens, Greece) has caused a flash flood with many fatalities in the city of Mandra as well as material damages. After this incident a debate started on whether the devastating results were due to the extreme nature of the rainfall event or to the poor flood protection works. In this study, we present information gathered from several sources (including hydrometric data from a neighboring catchment, point rainfall data from the broader area of interest, satellite observations and audiovisual material) in an attempt to represent the rainfall-runoff event. We further analyze the available data to approximately estimate the return period of the storm event. Finally, we discuss on the feasibility of the prediction of this storm.

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Kanellopoulos, T. D., A. P. Karageorgis, A. Kikaki, S. Chourdaki, I. Hatzianestis, I. Vakalas, and G.-A. Hatiris, The impact of flash-floods on the adjacent marine environment: the case of Mandra and Nea Peramos (November 2017), Greece, Journal of Coastal Conservation, 24, 56, doi:10.1007/s11852-020-00772-6, 2020.

  1. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Velocity-based approach for establishing a varying time of concentration: Α study in three Mediterranean countries, Le Giornate dell’ Idrologia 2017, Favignana, Società Idrologica Italiana, 2017.

    The time of concentration, tc, has a crucial role in hydrological design, as an essential input of rainfall-runoff modelling. In common practices it is considered as a characteristic property of the watershed, even though theoretical proof and empirical evidence imply that it is a function of flow, and thus varies within the same basin. Here, we implement a velocity-based approach, partially integrated in a GIS environment and show that the relation between tc and runoff intensity for a basin is approximated almost perfectly by a power-law function. The coefficient of this relation depends on the length and mean slope of the main stream and the exponent shows a small variability within the tested basins. Next, we propose a regional formula for the estimation of tc that is a function of runoff intensity, as well as, key geomorphological characteristics of the basin, calibrated and validated in a number of Mediterranean river basins in Greece, Italy and Cyprus. Lastly, we propose its adaptation in flood modelling, in particular in the SCS-CN method, using a parametrised Synthetic Unit Hydrograph (SUH) whose shape is dynamically adjusted according to the runoff produced during the flood event. The proposed methodology is tested in a number of observed flood events with very satisfying results in the majority of the cases.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1841/1/documents/EleniMich2017.pdf (5417 KB)

  1. E. Michailidi, S. Antoniadi, A. Koukouvinos, B. Bacchi, and A. Efstratiadis, Adaptation of the concept of varying time of concentration within flood modelling: Theoretical and empirical investigations across the Mediterranean, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 19, Vienna, 19, EGU2017-10663-1, European Geosciences Union, 2017.

    The time of concentration, tc, is a key hydrological concept and often is an essential parameter of rainfall-runoff modelling, which has been traditionally tackled as a characteristic property of the river basin. However, both theoretical proof and empirical evidence imply that tc is a hydraulic quantity that depends on flow, and thus it should be considered as variable and not as constant parameter. Using a kinematic method approach, easily implemented in GIS environment, we first illustrate that the relationship between tc and the effective rainfall produced over the catchment is well-approximated by a power-type law, the exponent of which is associated with the slope of the longest flow path of the river basin. Next, we take advantage of this relationship to adapt the concept of varying time of concentration within flood modelling, and particularly the well-known SCS-CN approach. In this context, the initial abstraction ratio is also considered varying, while the propagation of the effective rainfall is employed through a parametric unit hydrograph, the shape of which is dynamically adjusted according to the runoff produced during the flood event. The above framework is tested in a number of Mediterranean river basins in Greece, Italy and Cyprus, ensuring faithful representation of most of the observed flood events. Based on the outcomes of this extended analysis, we provide guidance for employing this methodology for flood design studies in ungauged basins.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1681/2/documents/2017_EGU_TcPosterA0_1_1.pdf (899 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. Ο. Daskalou, M. Karanastasi, Y. Markonis, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, GIS-based approach for optimal siting and sizing of renewables considering techno-environmental constraints and the stochastic nature of meteorological inputs, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, EGU2016-12044-1, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.19535.48803, European Geosciences Union, 2016.

    Following the legislative EU targets and taking advantage of its high renewable energy potential, Greece can obtain significant benefits from developing its water, solar and wind energy resources. In this context we present a GIS-based methodology for the optimal sizing and siting of solar and wind energy systems at the regional scale, which is tested in the Prefecture of Thessaly. First, we assess the wind and solar potential, taking into account the stochastic nature of the associated meteorological processes (i.e. wind speed and solar radiation, respectively), which is essential component for both planning (i.e. type selection and sizing of photovoltaic panels and wind turbines) and management purposes (i.e. real-time operation of the system). For the optimal siting, we assess the efficiency and economic performance of the energy system, also accounting for a number of constraints, associated with topographic limitations (e.g., terrain slope, proximity to road and electricity grid network, etc.), the environmental legislation and other land use constraints. Based on this analysis, we investigate favorable alternatives using technical, environmental as well as financial criteria. The final outcome is GIS maps that depict the available energy potential and the optimal layout for photovoltaic panels and wind turbines over the study area. We also consider a hypothetical scenario of future development of the study area, in which we assume the combined operation of the above renewables with major hydroelectric dams and pumped-storage facilities, thus providing a unique hybrid renewable system, extended at the regional scale.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1609/2/documents/2016EGU_RenewablesOptLocation.pdf (1719 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.19535.48803

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Wu, Y., T. Zhang, C. Xu, B. Zhang, L. Li, Y. Ke, Y. Yan, and R. Xu, Optimal location selection for offshore wind-PV-seawater pumped storage power plant using a hybrid MCDM approach: A two-stage framework, Energy Conversion and Management, 199, doi:10.1016/j.enconman.2019.112066, 2019.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, S.M. Papalexiou, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, L. Vasiliades, G. Papaioannou, and A. Loukas, Flood risk assessment at the regional scale: Computational challenges and the monster of uncertainty, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, Vienna, EGU2016-12218, European Geosciences Union, 2016.

    We present a methodological framework for flood risk assessment at the regional scale, developed within the implementation of the EU Directive 2007/60 in Greece. This comprises three phases: (a) statistical analysis of extreme rainfall data, resulting to spatially-distributed parameters of intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) relationships and their confidence intervals, (b) hydrological simulations, using event-based semi-distributed rainfall-runoff approaches, and (c) hydraulic simulations, employing the propagation of flood hydrographs across the river network and the mapping of inundated areas. The flood risk assessment procedure is employed over the River Basin District of Thessaly, Greece, which requires schematization and modelling of hundreds of sub-catchments, each one examined for several risk scenarios. This is a challenging task, involving multiple computational issues to handle, such as the organization, control and processing of huge amount of hydrometeorological and geographical data, the configuration of model inputs and outputs, and the co-operation of several software tools. In this context, we have developed supporting applications allowing massive data processing and effective model coupling, thus drastically reducing the need for manual interventions and, consequently, the time of the study. Within flood risk computations we also account for three major sources of uncertainty, in an attempt to provide upper and lower confidence bounds of flood maps, i.e. (a) statistical uncertainty of IDF curves, (b) structural uncertainty of hydrological models, due to varying anteceded soil moisture conditions, and (c) parameter uncertainty of hydraulic models, with emphasis to roughness coefficients. Our investigations indicate that the combined effect of the above uncertainties (which are certainly not the unique ones) result to extremely large bounds of potential inundation, thus rising many questions about the interpretation and usefulness of current flood risk assessment practices.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1608/2/documents/2016_EGU_FloodPoster.pdf (3293 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. E. Rozos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and C. Makropoulos, Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-6528, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/ consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130x170 km2. The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1525/2/documents/Poster_UWOT.pdf (307 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. A. Koukouvinos, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, E. Rozos, S.M. Papalexiou, P. Dimitriadis, Y. Markonis, P. Kossieris, H. Tyralis, G. Karakatsanis, K. Tzouka, A. Christofides, G. Karavokiros, A. Siskos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Integrated water and renewable energy management: the Acheloos-Peneios region case study, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-4912, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    Within the ongoing research project “Combined Renewable Systems for Sustainable Energy Development” (CRESSENDO), we have developed a novel stochastic simulation framework for optimal planning and management of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems, in which hydropower plays the dominant role. The methodology and associated computer tools are tested in two major adjacent river basins in Greece (Acheloos, Peneios) extending over 15 500 km2 (12% of Greek territory). River Acheloos is characterized by very high runoff and holds ~40% of the installed hydropower capacity of Greece. On the other hand, the Thessaly plain drained by Peneios – a key agricultural region for the national economy – usually suffers from water scarcity and systematic environmental degradation. The two basins are interconnected through diversion projects, existing and planned, thus formulating a unique large-scale hydrosystem whose future has been the subject of a great controversy. The study area is viewed as a hypothetically closed, energy-autonomous, system, in order to evaluate the perspectives for sustainable development of its water and energy resources. In this context we seek an efficient configuration of the necessary hydraulic and renewable energy projects through integrated modelling of the water and energy balance. We investigate several scenarios of energy demand for domestic, industrial and agricultural use, assuming that part of the demand is fulfilled via wind and solar energy, while the excess or deficit of energy is regulated through large hydroelectric works that are equipped with pumping storage facilities. The overall goal is to examine under which conditions a fully renewable energy system can be technically and economically viable for such large spatial scale.

    Full text:

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.17726.69440

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Stamou, A. T., and P. Rutschmann, Pareto optimization of water resources using the nexus approach, Water Resources Management, 32, 5053-5065, doi:10.1007/s11269-018-2127-x, 2018.
    2. Stamou, A.-T., and P. Rutschmann, Optimization of water use based on the water-energy-food nexus concept: Application to the long-term development scenario of the Upper Blue Nile River, Water Utility Journal, 25, 1-13, 2020.

  1. A. Zarkadoulas, K. Mantesi, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, K. Mazi, D. Katsanos, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, Vienna, EGU2015-3904, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.21920.99842, European Geosciences Union, 2015.

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1o forecast of GSF–NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations over the two basins. By combining consecutive rainfall forecasts at the sub-basin scale (a kind of ensemble prediction), we run the model in forecast mode to generate trajectories of flow predictions and associated uncertainty bounds.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21920.99842

  1. T. Tsitseli, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Construction of ombrian curves using the Hydrognomon software system, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    Hydrognomon is an application for the analysis of hydrological data and includes several applications for time series processing, such as time step aggregation and regularization, interpolation, regression analysis and infilling of missing values, consistency tests, data filtering, graphical and tabular visualization of time series, etc. Both its source code and the executable program are freely available. The new version of Hydrognomon includes a module for the construction of ombrian (intensity-duration-frequency) curves. It is based on a mathematical framework that expresses ombrian curves with unified relationships giving rain intensity in terms of duration and return period, either for a single gauging station or for a station group over a specified area. In the latter case, it supports either single parameters set or spatially varying parameters. The framework is completed with raw rainfall data processing, data management and storage, graphical user interface, and output data graphs and export facilities.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1393/1/documents/2013Kos_Ombrian.pdf (725 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.34517.01762

  1. Y. Markonis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of drought characteristics in different temporal and spatial scales: A case study in the Mediterranean region , Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    In 1988-1995 Greece experienced a drought, one of the most extended (both in space and time) and intense since the beginning of hydro-meteorological instrumental measurements. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon in different temporal and spatial scales in order to (a) identify possible links with Mediterranean/global climatic regime and (b) to demonstrate the role of the marginal distribution and the autocorrelation function in estimating the return period of the drought and its impact. Three spatial scales were examined: the local scale (regions of Peloponnese in the southern and Macedonia in the northern part of Greece; ~2x2° each), the national scale (~8x8°) and the Mediterranean scale (~15x45°). In the time domain the monthly, annual and inter-annual time steps were taken, while the time horizon is that of the instrumental record as well as a broader time window obtained by introducing qualitative evidence from paleoclimatic studies. Our findings show both strong temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity, which imply enhanced uncertainty.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1390/1/documents/KosDroughtPoster.pdf (661 KB)

  1. E. Michailidi, T. Mastrotheodoros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Flood modelling in river basins with highly variable runoff, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30847.00167, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    In the Mediterranean area numerous small to medium-scale river basins are characterized by highly-variable runoff, intermittent or ephemeral. This is due to both the climatic regime and the geomorphological and physiographic peculiarities of the hydrological system itself. Typically, these basins are affected by flash floods, for which effective modelling can be more difficult than in the case of large basins with permanent runoff. In this study we compare different modelling approaches in two representative catchments (one in Greece and one in Cyprus), on the basis of a number of observed flood events. Initially, we employ the well-known SCS-CN method, combined with a synthetic unit hydrograph (SUH) approach, whose parameters (namely, the curve number, the initial abstraction ratio and the time-to-peak of the SUH) are calibrated against each individual flood event. Yet, even with calibrated parameters, the above method, which is widespread among flood engineers, generally fails to reproduce the observed hydrographs. Next, we test different modelling structures, all of which use elementary hydraulic analogues (by means of interconnected tanks) to represent the storage processes, which are dominant in such types of basins. For each event we run different settings of the calibration problem, thus obtaining a large set of alternative optimal parameter values. The significant variability of the parameter values reflects the complexity of the involved hydrological processes. In addition, it reveals the crucial role of flood measurements, in order to build realistic models and provide consistent estimations of the related uncertainties.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1385/1/documents/Kos_Basins_poster.pdf (1881 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.30847.00167

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Taguas, E., Y. Yuan, F. Licciardello, and J. Gómez, Curve Numbers for olive orchard catchments: case study in Southern Spain, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000892, 05015003, 2015.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, A stochastic simulation framework for flood engineering, Facets of Uncertainty: 5th EGU Leonardo Conference – Hydrofractals 2013 – STAHY 2013, Kos Island, Greece, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013.

    Flood engineering is typically tackled as a sequential application of formulas and models, with specific assumptions and parameter values, thus providing fully deterministic outputs. In this procedure, the unique probabilistic concept is the return period of rainfall, which is set a priori, to represent the acceptable risk of all design variables of interest (peak flows, flood hydrographs, flow depths and velocities, inundated areas, etc.). Yet, a more consistent approach would require estimating the risks by integrating the uncertainties of all individual variables. This option can be offered by stochastic simulation, which is the most effective and powerful technique for analysing systems of high complexity and uncertainty. This presupposes to recognize which of the modelling components represent time-varying processes and which ones represent unknown, thus uncertain, parameters. In the proposed framework both should be handled as random variables. The following computational steps are envisaged: (a) generation of synthetic time series of areal rainfall, through multivariate stochastic disaggregation models; (b) generation of random sets of initial soil moisture conditions; (c) run of hydrological and hydraulic simulation models with random sets of parameter values, picked from suitable distributions; (d) statistical analysis of the model outputs and determination of empirical pdfs; and (e) selection of the design value, which corresponds to the acceptable risk. This approach allows for estimating the full probability distribution of the output variables, instead of a unique value, as resulted by the deterministic procedure. In this context, stochastic simulation also offers the means to introduce the missing culture of uncertainty appreciation in flood engineering.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1384/1/documents/KosFloodStochSim.pdf (1860 KB)

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.16848.51201

  1. V. Pagana, A. Tegos, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Panagopoulos, and N. Mamassis, Alternative methods in floodplain hydraulic simulation - Experiences and perspectives, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10283-2, European Geosciences Union, 2013.

    Floods can simply be defined as the physical phenomena, during which an initially dry land area is covered by water. Floods are normally caused by extreme weather conditions, while their evolution depends mainly on geomorphologic factors, such as soil stability, vegetation cover, as well as the geometrical characteristics of the river basin. To prevent floods’ consequences, we have to study the hydraulic behavior of all the basins. Here, the study is focused on the upstream part of the Rafina basin, located in the east of Athens (Greece). Particularly, a hydraulic simulation is accomplished via the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi-two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the effects of the floodplain and river roughness coefficients on the flood inundation in conjunction with a modern probabilistic view. Finally, a comparison between the three models is made regarding the simulated maximum water depth and maximum flow velocity.

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Μίχας, Σ. Ν., Κ. Ι. Νικολάου, Σ. Λ. Λαζαρίδου, και Μ. Ν. Πικούνης, Σύγκριση μαθηματικών ομοιωμάτων διόδευσης πλημμυρικού κύματος από υποθετική θραύσης φράγματος Αγιόκαμπου, Πρακτικά 2ου Πανελλήνιου Συνεδρίου Φραγμάτων και Ταμιευτήρων, Αθήνα, Αίγλη Ζαππείου, Ελληνική Επιτροπή Μεγάλων Φραγμάτων, 2013.

  1. A. Oikonomou, P. Dimitriadis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Tegos, V. Pagana, P. Panagopoulos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2013, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, Vienna, EGU2013-10366, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040, European Geosciences Union, 2013.

    The European Union Floods Directive defines a flood as ‘a covering by water of land not normally covered by water’. Human activities, such as agriculture, urban development, industry and tourism, contribute to an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events. The study of the hydraulic behaviour of a river is important in flood risk management. Here, we investigate the behaviour of three hydraulic models, with different theoretical frameworks, in a real case scenario. The area is located in the Penios river basin, in the plain of Thessaly (Greece). The three models used are the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D which are compared to each other, in terms of simulated maximum water depth as well as maximum flow velocity, and to a real flood event. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how each simulation is affected by the river and floodplain roughness coefficient, in terms of flood inundation.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25165.03040

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Μίχας, Σ. Ν., Κ. Ι. Νικολάου, Σ. Λ. Λαζαρίδου, και Μ. Ν. Πικούνης, Σύγκριση μαθηματικών ομοιωμάτων διόδευσης πλημμυρικού κύματος από υποθετική θραύσης φράγματος Αγιόκαμπου, Πρακτικά 2ου Πανελλήνιου Συνεδρίου Φραγμάτων και Ταμιευτήρων, Αθήνα, Αίγλη Ζαππείου, Ελληνική Επιτροπή Μεγάλων Φραγμάτων, 2013.

  1. S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and D. Nikolopoulos, Using open source software for the supervision and management of the water resources system of Athens, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14, Vienna, 7158, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482, European Geosciences Union, 2012.

    The water supply of Athens, Greece, is implemented through a complex water resource system, extending over an area of around 4 000 km2 and including surface water and groundwater resources. It incorporates four reservoirs, 350 km of main aqueducts, 15 pumping stations, more than 100 boreholes and 5 small hydropower plants. The system is run by the Athens Water Supply and Sewerage Company (EYDAP). Over more than 10 years we have developed, information technology tools such as GIS, database and decision support systems, to assist the management of the system. Among the software components, “Enhydris”, a web application for the visualization and management of geographical and hydrometeorological data, and “Hydrognomon”, a data analysis and processing tool, are now free software. Enhydris is entirely based on free software technologies such as Python, Django, PostgreSQL, and JQuery. We also created http://openmeteo.org/, a web site hosting our free software products as well as a free database system devoted to the dissemination of free data. In particular, “Enhydris” is used for the management of the hydrometeorological stations and the major hydraulic structures (aqueducts, reservoirs, boreholes, etc.), as well as for the retrieval of time series, online graphs etc. For the specific needs of EYDAP, additional GIS functionality was introduced for the display and monitoring of the water supply network. This functionality is also implemented as free software and can be reused in similar projects. Except for “Hydrognomon” and “Enhydris”, we have developed a number of advanced modeling applications, which are also generic-purpose tools that have been used for a long time to provide decision support for the water resource system of Athens. These are “Hydronomeas”, which optimizes the operation of complex water resource systems, based on a stochastic simulation framework, “Castalia”, which implements the generation of synthetic time series, and “Hydrogeios”, which employs conjunctive hydrological and hydrogeological simulation, with emphasis to human-modified river basins. These tools are currently available as executable files that are free for download though the ITIA web site (http://itia.ntua.gr/). Currently, we are working towards releasing their source code as well, through making them free software, after some licensing issues are resolved.

    Full text:

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28468.04482

  1. A. Christofides, S. Kozanis, G. Karavokiros, and A. Koukouvinos, Enhydris, Filotis & openmeteo.org: Free software for environmental management, FLOSS Conference 2011, Athens, http://conferences.ellak.gr/2011/, 2011.

    A presentation of two free software application for environmental management, developed in National Technical University of Athens. Enhydris is an Information system - server software for the management, storage and retrieval of hydrometeorological data, accessible through the internet. Enhydris is used by the National Data Bank of Hydrometeorolical Information (Hydroscope) and it also used by other agencies in Greece and European Union. In addition it is provided as a service of free content under the web address: openmeteo.org where individuals can download or upload their data. The Information System for the Greek Nature "Filotis", contains biotopes and species of flora and fauna of Greece.

    The development of the application is based on Python Computer Language and Django. Finally applications are providing geospatial data in a Web-GIS form by using free software GIS tools.

    Speach video is here: http://www.vimeo.com/25340067

    Related works:

    • [91] Leaflet Filotis presentation

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1145/1/documents/2011_FLOSS_Enhydris_presentation.pdf (3847 KB)

    Additional material:

    See also: http://conferences.ellak.gr/2011/

  1. K. Hadjibiros, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and E. Kyritsis, Data base for the Greek nature (FILOTIS), The NTUA in the lead of research and technology , Athens, 2007.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/877/1/documents/paper_filot.pdf (192 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, I. Nalbantis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Control of uncertainty in complex hydrological models via appropriate schematization, parameterization and calibration, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 02181, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.28297.65124, European Geosciences Union, 2006.

    The recent expansion of complex, distributed modelling schemes results in significant increase of computational effort, thus making the traditional parameter estimation problem extremely difficult to handle. Recent advances provide a variety of mathematical techniques to quantify the uncertainty of model predictions. Despite their different theoretical background, such approaches aim to discover "promising" trajectories of the model outputs that correspond to multiple, "behavioural" parameter sets, rather than a single "global optimal" one. Yet, their application indicates that it is not unusual the case where model predictive uncertainty is comparable to the typical statistical uncertainty of the measured outputs, thus making the model validity at least questionable. Uncertainty is due to multiple sources that are interacted in a chaotic manner. Some of them are "inherent" and therefore unavoidable, as they are related to the complexity of physical processes, necessarily represented through simplified hypotheses about the watershed behaviour. Other sources are though controllable via appropriate schematization, parameterization and calibration. This involves adaptation of the principle of parsimony, appropriate distributed models and incorporation of hydrological experience within the parameter estimation procedure. The above issues are discussed on the basis of a conjunctive modelling scheme, fitted to two complex hydrosystems of Greece. A parsimonious structure is made possible by spatial analysis that is consistent with the available data and the operational requirements regarding water management, and the correspondence of model parameters to the "broad" physical characteristics of each system. Within the calibration strategy, the key concept is to exploit any type of knowledge, including systematic measurements as well as additional information about non-measured model outputs, in a multi-response optimization framework. The entire approach contributes to a significant reduction of uncertainties, as indicated by successful validation results.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28297.65124

  1. A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, A. Christofides, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, K. Noutsopoulos, E. Romas, L. Kaliakatsos, A. Andreadakis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The ODYSSEUS project: Developing an advanced software system for the analysis and management of water resource systems, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, Vienna, 03910, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805, European Geosciences Union, 2006.

    The ODYSSEUS project (from the Greek acronym of its full title "Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System") aims at providing support to decision-makers towards integrated water resource management. The end-product comprises a system of co-operating software applications, suitable to handle a wide spectrum of water resources problems. The key methodological concepts are the holistic modelling approach, through the conjunctive representation of processes regarding water quantity and quality, man-made interventions, the parsimony of both input data requirements and system parameterization, the assessment of uncertainties and risks, and the extended use of optimization both for modelling (within various scales) and derivation of management policies. The core of the system is a relational database, named HYDRIA, for storing hydrosystem information; this includes geographical data, raw and processed time series, characteristics of measuring stations and facilities, and a variety of economic, environmental and water quality issues. The software architecture comprises various modules. HYDROGNOMON supports data retrieval, processing and visualization, and performs a variety of time series analysis tasks. HYDROGEIOS integrates a conjunctive hydrological model within a systems-oriented water management scheme, which estimates the available water resources at characteristic sites of the river basin and at the underlying aquifer. HYDRONOMEAS is the hydrosystem control module and locates optimal operation policies that minimize the risk and cost of decision-making. Additional modules are employed to prepare input data. DIPSOS estimates water needs for various uses (water supply, irrigation, industry, etc.), whereas RYPOS estimates pollutant loads from point and non-point sources, at a river basin scale. A last category comprises post-processing modules, for evaluating the proposed management policies by means of economical efficiency and water quality requirements. The latter include sophisticated models that estimate the space and time variation of specific pollutants within rivers (HERIDANOS) and lakes (LERNE), as well as simplified versions of them to be used within the hydrosystem simulation scheme. An interactive framework enables the exchange of data between the various modules, either off-line (through the database) or on-line, via appropriate design of common information structures. The whole system is in the final phase of its development and parts of it have been already tested in operational applications, by water authorities, organizations and consulting companies.

    Full text:

    Additional material:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24942.20805

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Tegos, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S.M. Papalexiou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Hydrogeios, an integrated model for simulating complex hydrographic networks - A case study to West Thessaly region, 7th Plinius Conference on Mediterranean Storms, Rethymnon, Crete, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

    An integrated scheme, comprising a conjunctive hydrological model and a systems oriented management model, was developed, based on a semi-distributed approach. Geographical input data include the river network, the sub-basins upstream of each river node and the aquifer dicretization in the form of groundwater cells of arbitrary geometry. Additional layers of distributed geographical information, such as geology, land cover and terrain slope, are used to define the hydrological response units. Various modules are combined to represent the main processes at the water basin such as, soil moisture, groundwater, flood routing and water management models. Model outputs include river discharges, spring flows, groundwater levels and water abstractions. The model can be implemented in daily and monthly basis. A case study to the West Thessaly region performed. The discharges of five hydrometric stations and the water levels of eight boreholes were used simultaneously for model calibration. The implementation of the model to the certain region demonstrated satisfactory agreement between the observed and the simulated data.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25781.06881

  1. A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, A. Koukouvinos, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, and D. Koutsoyiannis, An integrated model for conjunctive simulation of hydrological processes and water resources management in river basins, European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2005, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, Vienna, 03560, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.27930.64960, European Geosciences Union, 2005.

    In complex hydrosystems, where natural processes are significantly affected by human interventions, a holistic modelling concept is required, to ensure a more faithful representation of mechanisms and hence a rational water resource management. An integrated scheme, comprising a conjunctive (i.e., surface and groundwater) hydrological model and a systems-oriented management model, was developed, based on a semi-distributed approach. Geographical input data include the river network, the sub-basins upstream of each river node and the aquifer discretization in the form of groundwater cells of arbitrary geometry. Additional layers of distributed geographical information, such as geology, land cover and terrain slope, are used to define the hydrological response units (HRUs); the latter are spatial components that correspond to areas of homogenous hydrological characteristics. On the other hand, input data for artificial components include reservoirs, water abstraction facilities, aqueducts and demand points. Dynamic input data consist of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration series, given at a sub-basin scale, and target demand series. Targets refer not only to water needs but also to various water management constraints, such as the preservation of minimum flows across the river network. Various modules are combined to represent the key processes in the watershed, i.e. (a) a conceptual soil moisture accounting model, with different parameters assigned to each HRU; (b) a groundwater model, based on a modified finite-volume numerical method; (c) a routing model, that implements the water movement across the river network; and (d) a water management model, inspired from the graph theory, which estimates the optimal hydrosystem fluxes, satisfying both physical constraints and target priorities and simultaneously minimising costs. Model outputs include discharges through the river network, spring flows, groundwater levels and water abstractions. The calibration employs an automatic procedure, based on multiple error criteria and a robust global optimisation algorithm. The model was applied to a meso-scale (~2000 km2) watershed in Greece, characterised by a complex physical system (a karstified background, with extended losses to the sea) and conflicting water uses. 10-year monthly discharge series from seven gauging stations were used to evaluate the model performance. Extended analysis proved that the exploitation of spatially distributed input information, in addition to the usage of a reasonable number of control variables that are fitted to multiple observed responses, ensures more realistic model parameters, also reducing prediction uncertainty, in comparison to earlier (both fully conceptual and fully distributed) approaches. Moreover, the incorporation of the water resource management scheme within the hydrological simulator makes the model suitable for operational use.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.27930.64960

Presentations and publications in workshops

  1. A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, T. Iliopoulou, S. Antoniadi, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Strategic plan for developing a National Hydrometric Network, Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - Second meeting of project partners, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2019.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1973/1/documents/NTUA_pres_June2019_PartB.pdf (2262 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net): Evolution of works, challeneges and perspectives, Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - Second meeting of project partners, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 2019.

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Hellenic Integrated Marine and Inland water Observing, Forecasting and offshore Technology System (HIMIOFoTS) - First meeting of project partners, Anavyssos, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, 2018.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1872/1/documents/NTUA_pres_HCMR_Sep2018_dnpy8Eq.pdf (4637 KB)

  1. Ο. Daskalou, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Methodology for optimal allocation and sizing of renewable energy sources using ArcGIS 10.3: Case study of Thessaly Perfecture, 24th Hellenic Meeting of ArcGIS Users, Crowne Plaza, Athens, Marathon Data Systems, 2016.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1616/2/documents/MDS-Olympia.pdf (2133 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, The quantitative dimension of WFD 2000/60, Water Framework Directive 2000/60 and Inland Water Protection: Research and Perspectives, Athens, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Specific Secreteriat of Water – Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, 2015.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1541/1/documents/2015_WFDQuantity1.pdf (787 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, Proposed methodological framework of flood hydrology, Workshop - Deucalion research project, Goulandris National Histroy Museum, 2014.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1468/1/documents/Presentation_Flood_Specifications.pdf (616 KB)

  1. A. Tegos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Varveris, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Assesment and implementation of ecological flow constraints in large hydroelectric works: The case of Acheloos, Ecological flow of rivers and the importance of their true assesment, 2014.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1455/1/documents/2014_envflows_pres.pdf (1344 KB)

  1. A. D. Koussis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Peppas, and A. Maheras, Estimating flood flows in ungauged Greek basins under hydroclimatic variability (Deukalion project) - Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Climate and Environmental Change in the Mediterranean Region, Pylos, Navarino Environmental Observatory, 2012.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1292/1/documents/DeflkalionPoster.pdf (258 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, The Master Plan for the water resource management of Greece (invited talk), International Conference: Integrated Management of Coastal Areas, Faliro, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005, CoPraNet, Mediterranean SOS, 2006.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.30398.08005

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Hydrological investigation of the Plastiras lake management, Workshop for the presentation of the research project "Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake", doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.16950.09286, Municipality of Karditsa, Karditsa, 2002.

    To protect the Plastiras Lake, a high quality of the natural landscape and a satisfactory water quality must be ensured, the conflicting water uses and demands must be arranged and effective water management practices must be established. This study focuses on the hydrological point-of-view of reservoir's operation, which is one of the three components of its management. The analysis is based on the collection and processing of the necessary geographical, hydrological and meteorological data. The main subject of the study is to investigate the safe yield capabilities for several minimum allowable reservoir level scenarios, by applying modern stochastic simulation and optimisation methods. The final product is to propose suitable management policies, through which the maximisation of water supply and irrigation withdrawals for a high reliability level can be ensured, after imposing the minimum reservoir level restriction.

    Full text:

    See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.16950.09286

  1. E. Rozos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Supervision and investigation of the boreholes of the Yliki area using geographical information system, 7th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1997.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/92/1/documents/1997GISRozos.pdf (233 KB)

  1. D. Hadjichristos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and A. Koukouvinos, Investigation of the design of storm sewer networks using geographical information system, 5th meeting of the Greek users of ArcInfo, Marathon Data Systems, 1995.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/96/1/documents/1995GISHadjichristos.pdf (280 KB)

Educational notes

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Lecture notes: Geographical Information Systems for Hydrology, School of Pedagogical & Technological Education (ASPAITE), 2017.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1935/1/documents/Aspaite_GIS.pdf (6633 KB)

Research reports

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Technical report: Development of a national monitoring system for surface water resources, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Τεύχος 2.1, June 2019.

    Related project: Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net)

    Full text:

  1. N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Technical report: Specification analysis of OpenHi.net system, Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net), Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 29 pages, Τεύχος 3.1, September 2018.

    Specifications for the web-based software system OpenHi.net are defined and associated requirements refering to its operational characteristics, geographical components management, measurement stations and related (raw and processed) data, and provided services and applications, are concluded.

    Related project: Open Hydrosystem Information Network (OpenHi.net)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1879/1/documents/OpenHi_Report3.pdf (1168 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, D. Nikolopoulos, H. Tyralis, A. Tegos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Case study in the Acheloos-Thessaly system, Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO), 98 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2015.

    This report describes the validation of methodologies and computer tools that have been developed in the context of the research project, in the interconnected river basin system of Acheloos and Peneios. The study area is modelled as a hypothetically closed and autonomous (in terms of energy balance) system, in order to investigate the perspectives of sustainable development at the peripheral scale, merely based on renewable energy.

    Related project: Combined REnewable Systems for Sustainable ENergy DevelOpment (CRESSENDO)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1613/1/documents/Report_EE4a.pdf (8010 KB)

  1. Y. Markonis, S. Lykoudis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Description of rainfall and meteorological data and processing, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 54 pages, September 2014.

    Objective of this report is the analysis of rainfall and meteorological data that are gathered from the pilot basins and the description of their processing for the generation of the essential time series. The time series that are derived through processing of real-time raw data from the monitoring network are: (a) point time series of rainfall and other meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity), and (b) time series of areal rainfall and potential evapotranspiration across all sub-basins of interest. Point rainfall depths from rain gauges are used for the generation of areal time series as well as the analysis of intense storm events. The extraction of areal rainfall across each basin or sub-basin of interest was done through typical techniques of spatial integration (Thiessen polygons), while the potential evapotranspiration data were indirectly estimated, as function of temperature.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1496/1/documents/Report_2_2.pdf (3082 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Michailidi, E. Galiouna, K. Tzouka, A. D. Koussis, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Description of regional approaches for the estimation of characteristic hydrological quantities, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 146 pages, September 2014.

    The objective of the report is the systematic investigation and evaluation of regional relationships and associated event-based models that are applied in flood studies, through validating their predictions across the pilot basins of the project. The research focuses on the most popular, in Greece as well as globally, hydrological design procedure, which is based on the application of the SCS-CN method for the estimation of hydrological losses, combined with the unit hydrograph theory for the transformation of surface runoff to flood hydrograph at the basin outlet. In the report are investigated both the theoretical-conceptual background of the models as well as the procedure for estimating their basic input quantities (time of concentration, runoff curve number, initial abstraction ratio, initial soil moisture conditions). In this respect, we analyzed more than 100 flood events in 11 sites of interest, which we attempted to represent through several alternative approaches. The analyses showed that it is essential to revise critical aspects of the hydrological design. The most important are: (a) the correction of the time of concentration, as estimated by the Giandotti formula, according to the rainfall intensity; (b) the estimation of parameter CN of the SCS-CN method on the basis of three characteristic layers of spatial information and its adjustment for given initial abstraction ratio; (c) the application of a parametric synthetic unit hydrograph, the time parameters of which depend not only on the characteristics of the basin’s surface but also the mechanisms of the shallow soil; and (d) the statistically consistent estimation of the flood design quantities on the basis of the probabilities of occurrence of the design rainfall under dry, medium or wet antecedent soil moisture conditions.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1495/1/documents/Report_3_3.pdf (28157 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, P. Dimitriadis, E. Rozos, and A. D. Koussis, Theoretical documentation of hydrological-hydraulic simulation model, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 108 pages, September 2014.

    We present the theoretical documentation of the hydrological-hydraulic simulation model that has been developed within the new version of computer system Hydrogeios. The model has been enhanced in order to represent the hydrological processes at the hourly time scale, which allows to be used for both hydrological design and flood forecasting. In the report are described in detail the whole theoretical background, based on the integration of simulation models for surface- and groundwater processes, water resources management models, and alternative numerical schemes for flow routing along the river network. Moreover, we explain the procedure for preparation of input data and construction of all essential thematic layers, as well as the procedure for estimating model parameters through advanced calibration tools.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1491/1/documents/Report_3_5.pdf (3568 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Στεφανίδης, Σ. Ντάφης, και Χ. Γιάνναρος, Υδρολογική απόκριση της λεκάνης απορροής του χειμάρρου «Μπασδέκη» Ολυμπιάδας στην καταιγίδα της 25ης Νοεμβρίου 2019, Υδροτεχνικά (2019-2020), 29, 13-26, 2020.

  1. A. Koukouvinos, Geographical data and procesing, DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools, Contractors: ETME: Peppas & Collaborators, Grafeio Mahera, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, National Observatory of Athens, 36 pages, March 2012.

    Related project: DEUCALION – Assessment of flood flows in Greece under conditions of hydroclimatic variability: Development of physically-established conceptual-probabilistic framework and computational tools

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1216/1/documents/Report_WP2_1.pdf (3456 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Final report, Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system, Contractors: , Report 2, 84 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2011.

    Related project: Maintenance, upgrading and extension of the Decision Support System for the management of the Athens water resource system

  1. C. Makropoulos, D. Damigos, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Benardos, Synoptic report and final conclusions, Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 32 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2010.

    Related project: Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1099/1/documents/Kostos_Nerou_EYDAP_Teuxos_5.pdf (418 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Makropoulos, C., and E. Papatriantafyllou, Developing roadmaps for the sustainable management of the urban water cycle: The case of WW reuse in Athens, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference of Environmental Science and Technology, Athens, 2013.

  1. C. Makropoulos, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Appraisal of financial cost and proposals for a rational management of the hydrosystem, Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, October 2010.

    Related project: Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1097/1/documents/Kostos_Nerou_EYDAP_Teuxos_3.pdf (1053 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Baki, S., and C. Makropoulos, Tools for energy footprint assessment in urban water systems, Procedia Engineering, 89, 548-556, doi:10.1016/j.proeng.2014.11.477, 2014.
    2. #Di Federico, V., C. Makropoulos, A. Monteiro, T. Liserra, S. Baki, and A. Galvão, The TRUST approach for the Transition to Sustainability of Urban Water Services: the water scarcity cluster, Water IDEAS 2014 - Intelligent Distribution for Efficient and Affordable Supplies, International Water Association (IWA), Bologna, Italy, 2014.
    3. Frijns, J., E. Cabrera Marchet, N. Carriço, D. Covas, A. J. Monteiro, H. M. Ramos, A. Bolognesi, C. Bragalli, S. Baki, and C. Makropoulos, Management tools for hydro energy interventions in water supply systems, Water Practice and Technology, 10(2), 214-228, doi:10.2166/wpt.2015.024, 2015.

  1. C. Makropoulos, A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and N. Chalkias, Mehodology for estimation of the financial cost , Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens, 40 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2010.

    Related project: Cost of raw water of the water supply of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1008/1/documents/Kostos_Nerou_EYDAP_Teuxos_1__.pdf (732 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, and E. Rozos, Hydrogeios - Version 2.0 - User manual, Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information" , Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 100 pages, November 2009.

    Related project: Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1424/1/documents/hydrogeios_manual.pdf (2692 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, E. Rozos, and A. Koukouvinos, Hydrogeios: Hydrological and hydrogeological simulation model - Documentation report, Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information" , 139 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, November 2009.

    Related project: Development of Database and software applications in a web platform for the "National Databank for Hydrological and Meteorological Information"

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/929/1/documents/Hydrogeios_documentation_.pdf (2561 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and S. Baki, Final report, Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas, Contractor: Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, November 2008.

    The purpose of the study is the development of a system for the supervision of the protected areas in Kephisos river basin. Using the applications developed, the staff of Kephisos Institution will achieve the real time recording of various activities inside the limits of protection belts. Specifically, three main applications have been developed: (a) A Geographical Information System (GIS) (b) A Global Positioning System Application (GPS) (c) An Internet application

    Related project: Development of a Geographical Information System and an Internet application for the supervision of Kephisos protected areas

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/898/1/documents/kif_final_report______________.pdf (2372 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Summary report, Athens, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 37 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, August 2008.

    The subject and the objectives of the research project are summarized, comprising: (a) collection of hydrological, geographical and water use data and hydrosystem properties; (b) investigation of a proposed legal, financial and social framework for the management of Smokovo reservoir; (c) investigation of the operational framework of other reservoirs; (d) investigation of alternative means for the organization and operation of the Water Management Body; (e) formulation of an operational plan for water resources management; (f) formulation of alternative management scenarios and optimal operation of the reservoir, according various levels of hydrosystem development, and (h) the integration of data and processes to a computer system.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/875/1/documents/report5.pdf (906 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Final report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 4, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, July 2008.

    The subject and the objectives of the research project are presented, comprising: (a) collection of hydrological, geographical and water use data and hydrosystem properties; (b) investigation of a proposed legal, financial and social framework for the management of Smokovo reservoir; (c) investigation of the operational framework of other reservoirs; (d) investigation of alternative means for the organization and operation of the Water Management Body; (e) formulation of an operational plan for water resources management; (f) formulation of alternative management scenarios and optimal operation of the reservoir, according various levels of hydrosystem development, and (h) the integration of data and processes to a computer system.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/840/1/documents/report4_v4.pdf (1766 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Safiolea, E., C. Makropoulos, and M. Mimikou, Benefits and challenges in integrated water resources modeling using OpenMI: the case of the Pinios River basin, Greece, Integrating Water Systems - Proceedings of the 10th International on Computing and Control for the Water Industry, CCWI 2009, Sheffiled, 481-484, 2010.

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Alternative scenarios for the management and optimal operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 3, 104 pages, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, July 2008.

    A range of scenarios for the management of the Smokovo reservoir and the related works are studied, taking into account the reservoir inflows, the development of works and the various water uses. In order to estimate inflows, a comprehensive hydrological investigation is carried out, based on the process of pluvial, meteorological, hydrometric and geographical data for the hydrosystem, and the representation of the natural processes using the semi-distributed hydrological model Hydrogeios. The model parameters are calibrated on the basis of historical runoff records in three system locations, which are reproduced with satisfactory accuracy. The resulted inflow sample is used for the generation of synthetic time series upstream of the dam, thorough model Castalia, which are input to the water management model Hydronomeas. Through the latter, various safe release scenarios are investigated for different water uses (irrigation, water supply, hydropower), depending on the works progress, and appropriate management policies are proposed, for short and long term horizon. The analyzes are implemented by means of a computer-based system that was developed for the project purposes, comprising databases and software tools.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/839/1/documents/report3_v4.pdf (2966 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Charizopoulos, N., and A. Psilovikos, Hydrologic processes simulation using the conceptual model Zygos: the example of Xynias drained Lake catchment (central Greece), Environmental Earth Sciences, doi:10.1007/s12665-016-5565-x, 2016.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Christofides, N. Mamassis, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, G. Karavokiros, S. Kozanis, D. Mamais, and K. Noutsopoulos, National Programme for the Management and Protection of Water Resources, Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation, 748 pages, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.25384.62727, Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, February 2008.

    Related project: Support on the compilation of the national programme for water resources management and preservation

    Full text:

    Works that cite this document: View on Google Scholar or ResearchGate

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Baltas, E. A., Climatic conditions and availability of water resources in Greece, International Journal of Water Resources Development, 24(4), 635-649, 2008
    2. Gikas, P., and G.Tchobanoglous, Sustainable use of water in the Aegean Islands, Journal of Environmental Management, 90(8), 2601-2611, 2009.
    3. Gikas, P., and A.N.Angelakis, Water resources management in Crete and in the Aegean Islands, with emphasis on the utilization of non-conventional water sources, Desalination, 248 (1-3), 1049-1064, 2009.
    4. Agrafioti, E., and E. Diamadopoulos, A strategic plan for reuse of treated municipal wastewater for crop irrigation on the Island of Crete, Agricultural Water Management, 105,57-64, 2012.
    5. #Zafirakis, D., C. Papapostolou, E. Kondili, and J. K. Kaldellis, Water use in the electricity generation sector: A regional approach evaluation for Greek thermal power plants, Protection and Restoration of the Environment XI, 1459-1468, 2012.
    6. Pisinaras, V., C. Petalas, V. A. Tsihrintzis and G. P. Karatzas, Integrated modeling as a decision-aiding tool for groundwater management in a Mediterranean agricultural watershed, Hydrological Processes, 27 (14), 1973-1987, 2013.
    7. Efstathiou, G.A., C. J. Lolis, N. M. Zoumakis, P. Kassomenos and D. Melas, Characteristics of the atmospheric circulation associated with cold-season heavy rainfall and flooding over a complex terrain region in Greece, Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 115 (1-2), 259-279, 2014.
    8. #Antoniou, G. P., Residential rainwater cisterns in Ithaki, Greece, IWA Regional Symposium on Water, Wastewater & Environment: Traditions & Culture (ed. by I. K. Kalavrouziotis and A. N. Angelakis), Patras, Greece, 675-685, International Water Association & Hellenic Open University, 2014.
    9. Kougioumoutzis, K., S.M. Simaiakis, and A. Tiniakou, Network biogeographical analysis of the central Aegean archipelago, Journal of Biogeography, 41 (10) 848-1858, 2014.
    10. Zafirakis, D., C. Papapostolou, E. Kondili, and J. K. Kaldellis, Evaluation of water‐use needs in the electricity generation sector of Greece, International Journal of Environment and Resource, 3(3), 39-45, doi:10.14355/ijer.2014.0303.01, 2014.
    11. Manakos, I., K. Chatzopoulos-Vouzoglanis, Z. I. Petrou, L. Filchev, and A. Apostolakis, Globalland30 Mapping capacity of land surface water in Thessaly, Greece, Land, 4 (1), 1-18, doi:10.3390/land4010001, 2015.
    12. Kallioras, A., and P. Marinos, Water resources assessment and management of karst aquifer systems in Greece, Environmental Earth Sciences, 74(1), 83-100, doi:10.1007/s12665-015-4582-5, 2015.
    13. #Grimpylakos , G., K. Albanakis, and T. S. Karacostas, Watershed size, an alternative or a misguided parameter for river’s waterpower? Implementation in Macedonia, Greece, Perspectives on Atmospheric Sciences, Springer Atmospheric Sciences, 295-301, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-35095-0_41, 2017.
    14. Tsangaratos, P. A. Kallioras , Th. Pizpikis, E. Vasileiou, I. Ilia, and F. Pliakas, Multi-criteria Decision Support System (DSS) for optimal locations of Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) facilities, Science of The Total Environment, 603–604, 472–486, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.238, 2017.
    15. Soulis, K. X., and D. E. Tsesmelis, Calculation of the irrigation water needs spatial and temporal distribution in Greece, European Water, 59, 247-254, 2017.
    16. Piria, M., P. Simonović, E. Kalogianni, L. Vardakas, N. Koutsikos, D. Zanella, M. Ristovska, A. Apostolou, A. Adrović, D. Mrdak, A. S. Tarkan, D. Milošević, L. N. Zanella, R. Bakiu, F. G. Ekmekçi, M. Povž, K. Korro, V. Nikolić, R. Škrijelj, V. Kostov, A. Gregori, and M. K. Joy, Alien freshwater fish species in the Balkans — Vectors and pathways of introduction, Fish and Fisheries, 19(1), 138–169, doi:10.1111/faf.12242, 2018.
    17. Falalakis, G. and A. Gemitzi, A simple method for water balance estimation based on the empirical method and remotely sensed evapotranspiration estimates, Journal of Hydroinformatics, 22(2), 440-451, doi:10.2166/hydro.2020.182, 2020.
    18. Laspidou, C. S., N. Mellios, A. Spyropoulou, D. Kofinas, and M. P. Papadopoulou, Systems thinking on the resource nexus: Modeling and visualisation tools to identify critical interlinkages for resilient and sustainable societies and institutions, Science of The Total Environment, 717, 137264, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137264, 2020.
    19. Tzanakakis, V. A., A. N. Angelakis, N. V. Paranychianakis, Y. G. Dialynas, and G. Tchobanoglous, Challenges and opportunities for sustainable management of water resources in the island of Crete, Greece, Water, 12(6), 1538, doi:10.3390/w12061538, 2020.
    20. Skrimizea, E., and C. Parra, An adaptation pathways approach to water management and governance of tourist islands: the example of the Southern Aegean Region in Greece, Water International, doi:10.1080/02508060.2020.1791683, 2020.

  1. N. Mamassis, R. Mavrodimou, A. Efstratiadis, M. Heidarlis, A. Tegos, A. Koukouvinos, P. Lazaridou, M. Magaliou, and D. Koutsoyiannis, Investigation of alternative organisations and operations of a Water Management Body for the Smokovo projects, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 2, 73 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2007.

    The framework regarding the establishment and operation of a water management body for the Smokovo reservoir and the related projects is investigated. The study area, as well as the responsibility area within it, is defined, and a short description of the characteristics for the physical and artificial system is made. The current legal and institutional framework is examined, on the basis of which various alternative schemes are proposed for the management body. Its legal and administrative status, the competence and the organogram are specified, and an initial financial analysis is attempted, to validate its viability. Finally, the next actions are proposed, regarding the organization of deliberations with the related organs.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/720/1/documents/Smo_teyx2ekd3.pdf (2847 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, E. Rozos, A. Tegos, and I. Nalbantis, Theoretical documentation of model for simulating hydrological-hydrogeological processes of river basin "Hydrogeios", Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS), Contractor: NAMA, Report 4a, 103 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2006.

    The subject of the report is the development of the software system HYDROGEIOS, which represents the hydrological and hydrogeological processes as well as the water resource management practices of a river basin. After a short review of the most recognized hydrological models and a general overview of the problem, we describe the theoretical background of the approach, comprising the combined operation of three models: (a) a conceptual soil moisture accounting model, with different parameters for each hydrological response unit, which estimates the transformation of precipitation to evapotranspiration, surface runoff and percolation; (b) a multicell groundwater model, which estimates the spatial distribution of the water table, the baseflow (spring runoff) and the underground losses; and (c) a water resources allocation model, which for given hydrological inflows along the river network, given characteristics of technical facilities (aqueducts, wells) and given targets and constraints, estimates the abstractions and the water balance at all hydrosystem control points, selecting the economical optimal management. The spatial analysis assumes a semi-distributed schematisation of the basin and its underlying aquifer, and also a rough description of the technical works, all employed via the use of geographical information systems. The time step of simulation is monthly or daily; in the last case, a routing model is optionally incorporated, based on the well-known Muskingum-Cunge method. Specific emphasis is given to the estimation of model parameters, by using statistical and empirical goodness-of-fit measures and evolutionary algorithms for single- and multi-objective optimisation. Finally, we present an application of the model to the Western Thessaly area.

    Related project: Integrated Management of Hydrosystems in Conjunction with an Advanced Information System (ODYSSEUS)

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/755/1/documents/report_4a.pdf (3877 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Πετροπούλου, Μ., Ε. Ζαγγάνα, Ν. Χαριζόπουλος, Μ. Μιχαλοπούλου, Α. Μυλωνάς, και Κ. Περδικάρης, Εκτίμηση του υδρολογικού ισοζυγίου της λεκάνης απορροής του Πηνειού ποταμού Ηλείας με χρήση του μοντέλου «Ζυγός», 14ο Πανελλήνιο Συνέδριο της Ελληνικής Υδροτεχνικής Ένωσης (ΕΥΕ), Βόλος, 2019.

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, L. Lazaridis, and N. Mamassis, Data report, Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir, Report 1, 66 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2006.

    The entire raw data (geographical, hydrological, data for water management, etc.) that was collected for the study area is presented, which involves the operation of the Smokovo reservoir and the related projects. The characteristics of the watersheds and the hydraulic structures (Smokovo dam and reservoir, Leontari tunnel and hydropower station, irrigation network) are examined. The water balance of the reservoir is constructed, for its operation period. The water uses (irrigation, water supply, power generation, tourism) are analysed, as well as the water quality parameters and the environmental requirements. Finally, the directions of the future works of the project are specified.

    Related project: Investigation of management scenarios for the Smokovo reservoir

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/696/1/documents/DataReport.pdf (2567 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, Geographical information system, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 18, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.

    Within the frame of the project entitled "Updating of the supervision and management of the Athens' water supply resources system" a Geographic Information System (GIS), related to the components of the water supply system of Athens, has been implemented. The GIS is used within the project for the visualization and the identification of the entities related to the management of the water supply system. The GIS project as well as the environment where the geographic data are implemented is presented. Finally, there is a description of how the geographic entities are related to their attributes stored in the Central Database (CDB).

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/615/1/documents/report18.pdf (2478 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, I. Nalbantis, G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, A. Christofides, E. Rozos, A. Economou, and G. M. T. Tentes, Methodology and theoretical background, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 15, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2004.

    The methodology that was developed for the analysis of the water supply system of Athens, even though it was dictated by the special requirements of this particular system, has a broader character and a generalised orientation. In this respect, a series of publications in international scientific journals and communications in scientific conferences and workshops were done, so that the methodology becomes known to the international scientific community and raises its critique. These publications and communications are classified into two categories, with the fist one containing those referring to the core of the water supply system analysis, i.e., to the system optimisation based on the original methodology parameterisation-simulation-optimisation, and the second one containing those dealing with stochastic simulation and prediction of the hydrological inputs to the system. For a clear description and explanation of the methodology, the publications in scientific journals are reproduced in this volume and, for completeness, the summaries of the communications in conferences are included as well.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

  1. Ministry of Development, NTUA, Institute of Geological and Mining Research, and Centre for Research and Planning, Master plan for water resource management of the country, Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 549 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, January 2003.

    Remarks:

    See the newer version of this report:

    National Programme for Water Resources Management and Preservation

    Related works:

    • [68] Newer version

    Related project: Completion of the classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of water resources in water districts of Greece

    Full text:

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, E. Rozos, Ch. Karopoulos, A. Nassikas, E. Nestoridou, and D. Nikolopoulos, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2002–2003, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 14, 215 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2002.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/552/1/documents/2002eydapmasterplan.pdf (8797 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, D. Koutsoyiannis, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological Study, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 2, 70 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.

    To protect the Plastiras Lake, a high quality of the natural landscape and a satisfactory water quality must be ensured, the conflicting water uses and demands must be arranged and effective water management practices must be established. This report refers to the hydrological point-of-view of reservoir's operation, which is one of the three components of its management. The analysis is based on the collection and processing of the necessary geographical, hydrological and meteorological data. The main subject of the study is to investigate the safe yield capabilities for several minimum allowable reservoir level scenarios, by applying modern stochastic simulation and optimization methods. The final product is to propose suitable management policies, through which we can ensure the maximization of water supply and irrigation withdrawals for a high reliability level, after imposing the minimum reservoir level restriction.

    Related project: Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/495/1/documents/2002PlastirasHydro.pdf (1120 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Loukas A., N. Mylopoulos, and L. Vasiliades, A modeling system for the evaluation of water resources management strategies in Thessaly, Greece, Water Resources Management, 21(10), 1673-1702, doi:10.1007/s11269-006-9120-5, 2007.
    2. #Strosser P., J. Roussard, B. Grandmougin, M. Kossida, I. Kyriazopoulou, J. Berbel, S. Kolberg, J. A. Rodríguez-Díaz, P. Montesinos, J. Joyce, T. Dworak, M. Berglund, and C. Laaser, EU Water saving potential (Part 2 – Case Studies), Berlin, Allemagne, Ecologic – Institute for International and European Environmental Policy, 101 pp., 2007.
    3. #Ευθυμίου, Γ., και Θ. Μπρουζιώτης, Η σημασία των παρόχθιων οικοσυστημάτων για τη διατήρηση της βιοποικιλότητας και της ποιότητας τοπίου – αναπτυξιακές δυνατότητες. Η περίπτωση δημιουργίας μικρών υγροτόπων στα περιθώρια υποβαθμισμένων οικολογικά λιμνών και ποταμών, για την ενίσχυση της βιοποικιλότητας, 2o Αναπτυξιακό Συνέδριο Νομού Καρδίτσας, Αναπτυξιακή Καρδίτσας, 2010.
    4. #Loukas, A., S. Dervisis, and N. Mylopoulos, Analysis and evaluation of a water resources system: Sourpi basin, Greece, Protection and Restoration of the Environment XI, 233-242, 2012.
    5. Giakoumakis, S., and C. Petropoulou, Simulating the operation of the Plastiras reservoir for different demand scenarios, Water Utility Journal, 25, 23-29, 2020.

  1. K. Hadjibiros, D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Andreadakis, A. Katsiri, A. Stamou, A. Valassopoulos, A. Efstratiadis, I. Katsiris, M. Kapetanaki, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, K. Noutsopoulos, G.-F. Sargentis, and A. Christofides, Overview report, Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake, Report 1, 23 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 2002.

    The Plastiras Lake is a reservoir used for irrigation, water supply, hydropower, and tourism. These uses are competitive and result in an especially complex problem of water management. In this report the problem is presented and the main points of the three parts of the project are summarised; these three parts are the hydrological study, the quality study, and the landscape study. The conflicting demands are arranged, and water release scenarios are suggested.

    Related project: Investigation of scenarios for the management and protection of the quality of the Plastiras Lake

    Full text:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Andreadakis, A., K. Noutsopoulos, and E. Gavalaki, Assessment of the water quality of Lake Plastira through mathematical modelling for alternative management scenarios, Global Nest: the International Journal, 5(2), pp 99-105, 2003.
    2. #Karalis, S. and A . Chioni, 1-D Hydrodynamic modeling of Greek lakes and reservoirs, Ch. 59 in Environmental Hydraulics, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics (ed. by A. I . Stamou), Athens, Greece, 397–401, 2010.
    3. Kalavrouziotis, I. K., A. Τ. Filintas, P. H. Koukoulakis, and J. N. Hatzopoulos, Application of multicriteria analysis in the management and planning of treated municipal wastewater and sludge reuse in agriculture and land development: the case of Sparti’s wastewater treatment plant, Greece, Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, 20(2), 287-295, 2011.

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, Ch. Karopoulos, S. Nalpantidou, A. Nassikas, D. Nikolopoulos, A. Xanthakis, and K. Ripis, Master plan of the Athens water resource system — Year 2001–2002, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 13, Athens, December 2001.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/487/2/documents/report13.pdf (8130 KB)

    Additional material:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Collins, R., P. Kristensen and N. Thyssen, Water Resources Across Europe—Confronting Water Scarcity and Drought, ISSN 1725-9177, 56 pp., European Environment Agency (EEA), Copenhagen, 2009.

  1. A. Koukouvinos, Design and implementation of the geographical database, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 7, 29 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, December 2000.

    Within the frame of the project entitled "Updating of the supervision and management of the Athens' water supply resources system" a database for geographic data, related to the components of the water supply system of Athens, has been designed. The database is part of the (under development) geographic information system for the project, which is used in storing spatial data and developing spatial applications. Τhe geographic database design and implementation is presented as well as the thematic coverages and entity classes that have been specified. Finally, the database tables, their items and a presentation of the data collected and implemented in the database are reported.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/415/1/documents/report7.pdf (318 KB)

  1. G. Karavokiros, A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, N. Damianoglou, K. Constantinidou, S. Nalpantidou, A. Xanthakis, and S Politaki, Analysis of the system requirements, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Report 1, 74 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 2000.

    Within the frame of the project entitled "Updating of the supervision and management of the water supply resources system of Athens" five software systems that are developed are specified. The first one is the Geographical Information System, which aims to model and to supervise the hydrosystem of Athens. The second one is a network of hydrometeorological measuring stations in the catchments, which are linked to the water resource system of Athens are specified. The third system is used for the estimation of inflow and losses of the reservoirs, where the forth one estimates and predicts the water resources in the aquifers of the Viotikos Kifissos and Yliki region. Finally, the fifth system supports the management of water resources. The specifications described are used as a guideline for the development of the above systems.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/410/1/documents/report1.pdf (694 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, G. Karavokiros, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, I. Nalbantis, D. Grintzia, N. Damianoglou, A. Xanthakis, S Politaki, and V. Tsoukala, Master plan of the Athens water resource system - Year 2000-2001, Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Report 5, 165 pages, Athens, December 2000.

    The master plan for the operation of the Athens water resource system for the hydrological year 2000-20001 deals first with issues on the relations between the different organisations involved in the water supply of Athens, i.e., the Water Supply and Sewage Company of Athens, the Infrastructure Company for Water Supply and Sewage of Athens and a number of ministries. Projections of the water demand and the related water resources availability are studied in the form of future scenarios for which optimised system operating rules are drawn. The scenarios consider the phenomenon of the drought persistence as well as various possible emergency incidents. Operating cost estimates are also given together with elements on the environmental dimensions of the subject. Finally, estimates of the system safe yield and of the energy consumption for pumping water are presented in detail.

    Related project: Modernisation of the supervision and management of the water resource system of Athens

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/356/1/documents/2000EYDAPMasterplan.pdf (1616 KB)

    Additional material:

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. #Getimis, P., K. Bithas and D. Zikos, Key actors, institutional framework and participatory procedures, for the sustainable use of water in Attica-basin, Proc. 7th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology, Syros, Greece, 243-252, 2001.
    2. #Minasidou K., D. F. Lekkas, A. D. Nikolaou, and S. K. Golfinopoulos, Water quality changes during storage - the case of Mornos reservoir, Proceedings, Protection and Restoration of the Environment VIII, Mykonos, Greece, 2006.
    3. Stergiouli, M. L., and K. Hadjibiros, The growing water imprint of Athens (Greece) throughout history, Regional Environmental Change, 12(2), 337-345, 2012.

  1. A. Koukouvinos, and E. Rozos, Final Report, Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia, 77 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 1999.

    Related project: Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/194/1/documents/er7_te.pdf (12048 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, and A. Christofides, Development of a geographic information system for hydrology, water use and related works, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3, Report 38, 50 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, January 1999.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 3

    Full text:

  1. A. Koukouvinos, and E. Rozos, Progress Report, Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia, 28 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1998.

    Related project: Systematisation of the raw data archive of surface and subsurface waters of the Ministry of Agriculture in Thessalia

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/192/1/documents/er7_ep.pdf (16068 KB)

  1. A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Processing of geographical information, Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia, Report 3, 39 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, March 1997.

    Related project: Upgrading and updating of hydrological information of Thessalia

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/185/1/documents/er5_3.pdf (34236 KB)

  1. Team of the YBET96 project, Master plan for the country's water resource management, Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 339 pages, Ministry of Development, Athens, November 1996.

    Related works:

    • [74] Newer edition

    Related project: Classification of quantitative and qualitative parameters of the water resources of Greece using geographical information systems

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, G. Tsakalias, N. Mamassis, and A. Koukouvinos, Surface water resources, Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river, Contractor: Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, 16 pages, 1995.

    The hydrologic characteristics of the Sperchios river basin are presented and analysed. To this aim all hydrologic measurements of the Sperchios basin, starting at 1949, as well as measurements at neighbouring hydrologic basins have been collected and compiled. Special emphasis was given to the discharge measurements at the locations Kastri Bridge and Kompotades Bridge, which had remained unprocessed until today. From the records formed, the surface water potential of the Sperchios basin is estimated, which proves to be one of the most important in the water district of the Eastern Sterea Hellas. Furthermore, a trend analysis for the rainfall and runoff series is presented, which indicates the existence of falling trends in both series. Finally, forecasts of the flood discharge at various locations along the Sperchios river for different return periods are provided.

    Related project: Integrated management of the riparian ecosystem of the Sperhios river

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/381/1/documents/1995SperhiosWatRes.pdf (313 KB)

    Additional material:

  1. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Maps - Part A: Information of the surface hydrology, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

  1. I. Stamataki, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Development of a geographical information system- Section A: Surface hydrology information, Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2, Report 22, 48 pages, Department of Water Resources, Hydraulic and Maritime Engineering – National Technical University of Athens, Athens, September 1995.

    Related project: Evaluation of Management of the Water Resources of Sterea Hellas - Phase 2

    Full text:

Miscellaneous works

  1. E. Savvidou, A. Efstratiadis, A. D. Koussis, A. Koukouvinos, and D. Skarlatos, A curve number approach to formulate hydrological response units within distributed hydrological modelling, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, doi:10.5194/hess-2016-627, 2016.

    We propose a systematic framework for delineating Hydrological Response Units (HRUs), based on a modified Curve Number (CN) approach. The CN-value accounts for three major physiographic characteristics of a river basin, by means of classes of soil permeability, land use/land cover characteristics, and drainage capacity. A semi-automatic procedure in a GIS environment allows producing basin maps of distributed CN-values as the product of the three classified layers. The map of CN-values is used in the context of model parameterization, in order to identify the essential number and spatial extent of HRUs and, consequently, the number of control variables of the calibration problem. The new approach aims at reducing the subjectivity introduced by the definition of HRUs, and simultaneously at providing parsimonious modelling schemes. In particular, the CN-based parameterization (1) allows the user to assign as many parameters as can be supported by the available hydrological information, (2) associates the model parameters with anticipated basin responses, as quantified in terms of CN classes across HRUs, and (3) reduces the effort for model calibration, simultaneously ensuring good predictive capacity. The advantages of the proposed framework are demonstrated in the hydrological simulation of Nedontas river basin, Greece, in which parameterizations of different complexities are employed in a recently improved version of the HYDROGEIOS modelling framework.

    Remarks:

    This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion. An improved version was eventually published in Water (http://www.itia.ntua.gr/1772/). Please, if you wish to cite this work, refer to the peer-reviewed article, not the discussion paper.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1673/1/documents/hess-2016-627.pdf (2890 KB)

    See also: http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/hess-2016-627/

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Verma, S., R. K. Verma, S. K. Mishra, A. Singh, and G. K. Jayaraj, A revisit of NRCS-CN inspired models coupled with RS and GIS for runoff estimation, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 62(12), 1891-1930, doi:10.1080/02626667.2017.1334166, 2017.
    2. D’ Ambrosio, S., A. M. De Girolamo, and M. C. Rulli, Assessing sustainability of agriculture through water footprint analysis and in-stream monitoring activities, Journal of Cleaner Production, 200(1), 454-470, doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.07.229, 2018.
    3. D’Ambrosio, E., A. M. De Girolamo, and M. C. Rulli, Coupling the water footprint accounting of crops and in-stream monitoring activities at the catchment scale, MethodsX, 5, 1221-1240, doi:10.1016/j.mex.2018.10.003, 2018.
    4. Weber, M., M. Feigl, K. Schulz, and M. Bernhardt, On the ability of LIDAR snow depth measurements to determine or evaluate the HRU discretization in a land surface model, Hydrology, 7(2), 20, doi:10.3390/hydrology7020020, 2020.
    5. Prastowo, T., A. Saggaff, and F. Hadinata, A study of watershed characteristics of Tiga Dihaji dam, International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research, 9(4), 1135-1141, 2020.

  1. S. Kozanis, and A. Koukouvinos, Presentation of "Filotis", an Information System for the natural environment of Greece, Athens, April 2011.

    A brief presentation of "Filotis", an Information System for the natural environment of Greece. Several biotopes and sites are in the main database as well species of flora and fauna of Greece.

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1141/1/documents/filotis_leaf.pdf (2125 KB)

    Other works that reference this work (this list might be obsolete):

    1. Jiang, P., M. R. Gautam, J. Zhu, and Z. Yu, How well do the GCMs/RCMs capture the multi-scale temporal variability of precipitation in the Southwestern United States?, Journal of Hydrology, 2012.

Engineering reports

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Estimation of flood hydrographs at selected streams crossing Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) – Section 1, Detailed design of TAP - Section 1, Commissioner: Asprofos Engineering, Contractors: , September 2016.

    Related project: Detailed design of TAP - Section 1

  1. A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Gaborone storm study, Consultancy Services for Conceptual Design, Preparation of Bidding Documents, Assistance during the Selection of Contractor & Monitoring/Supervision of Construction, Instalation, Operation & Maintainance for Traffic Control (CTC) for Greater Gaborone City, Contractor: Erasmos Consulting Engineering, 7 pages, July 2015.

    In the context of upgrading and widening the road network of Gaborone, Botswana, the impacts on the stormwater management are examined. In addition, it is proposed that the new lanes that will be constructed in the major roads of Gaborone can have a zero or even negative impact on the stormwater discharge and volume by employing improved and environmental-friendly stormwater management practices, by means of permeable pavement systems. Such systems will be combined with foot and bicycle paths that will be constructed adjacent to the major roads. In this report an overview of the proposed scheme is presented along with a description of the permeable pavement system, as a sustainable alternative for urban flood management, in treating urban runoff for water reuse and recycling. Based on sketchy information about the flood characteristics of Gaborone, rough estimations and guidelines for the hydrological and hydraulic design of the roadside drainage system are also provided.

    Related project: Consultancy Services for Conceptual Design, Preparation of Bidding Documents, Assistance during the Selection of Contractor & Monitoring/Supervision of Construction, Instalation, Operation & Maintainance for Traffic Control (CTC) for Greater Gaborone City

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, A. Efstratiadis, and A. Koukouvinos, Technical report: Investigation of flood flows in the river basin of Almopaios, Pleriminary study of Almopaios dam, Commissioner: Roikos Consulting Engeineers S.A., Contractors: , 43 pages, July 2014.

    Related project: Pleriminary study of Almopaios dam

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/1840/1/documents/2014AlmopaiosReport.pdf (1110 KB)

  1. A. Efstratiadis, A. Koukouvinos, N. Mamassis, S. Baki, Y. Markonis, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 205 pages, February 2013.

    Related project: Κατάρτιση Σχεδίων Διαχείρισης των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών των Υδατικών Διαμερισμάτων Δυτικής Μακεδονίας και Κεντρικής Μακεδονίας, σύμφωνα με τις προδιαγραφές της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ, κατ’εφαρμογή του Ν. 3199/2003 και του Π.Δ. 51/2007

  1. A. Koukouvinos, A. Efstratiadis, N. Mamassis, Y. Markonis, S. Baki, and D. Koutsoyiannis, [No English title available], , Commissioner: Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Contractor: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, 144 pages, February 2013.

    Related project: Κατάρτιση Σχεδίων Διαχείρισης των Λεκανών Απορροής Ποταμών των Υδατικών Διαμερισμάτων Δυτικής Μακεδονίας και Κεντρικής Μακεδονίας, σύμφωνα με τις προδιαγραφές της Οδηγίας 2000/60/ΕΚ, κατ’εφαρμογή του Ν. 3199/2003 και του Π.Δ. 51/2007

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, S.M. Papalexiou, N. Mamassis, and P. Dimitriadis, Hydrological study of severe rainfall in the Kephisos basin, Greece, Study of the management of Kephisos , Commissioner: General Secretariat of Public Works – Ministry of Environment, Planning and Public Works, Contractors: Exarhou Nikolopoulos Bensasson, Denco, G. Karavokiris, et al., 154 pages, Athens, 2010.

    Related project: Study of the management of Kephisos

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/970/1/documents/2010AthensOmbrian__.pdf (6638 KB)

  1. D. Koutsoyiannis, Y. Markonis, A. Koukouvinos, and N. Mamassis, Hydrological study of Arachthos floods, Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta, Commissioner: Municipality of Arta, Contractors: ADK - Aronis Drettas Karlaftis Consulting Engineers, YDROTEK, V. Mouzos, 272 pages, 2010.

    Related project: Delineation of the Arachthos River bed in the town of Arta

    Full text: http://www.itia.ntua.gr/en/getfile/950/1/documents/2010Arachthos_floods.pdf (3770 KB)

  1. N. Mamassis, A. Koukouvinos, and A. Efstratiadis, Hydrological study, , Commissioner: Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food, Contractor: ETME- Antoniou Peppas and Co., Athens, 2006.

    Related project: Μελέτες Διερεύνησης Προβλημάτων Άρδευσης και Δυνατότητας Κατασκευής Ταμιευτήρων Νομού Βοιωτίας